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  1. THAILAND LIVE

    Here’s why you may have to wait a while for the Windows 10 Creators Update BY STAFF WRITER The release of the Windows 10 Creators Update is almost upon us with with the next major update of Windows 10 expected to be launched in early April. Full story: http://tech.thaivisa.com/heres-why-you-may-have-to-wait-a-while-for-the-windows-10-creators-update/20610/
  2. THAILAND LIVE

    Challenge of finding room for skyscrapers, street vendors By Curtis S Chin Special to The Nation Hong Kong Communities must be put at the heart of urban development and planners must consider the impact of a city’s design also on inequality and on human lives Full story: http://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/975416-challenge-of-finding-room-for-skyscrapers-street-vendors/
  3. Challenge of finding room for skyscrapers, street vendors By Curtis S Chin Special to The Nation Hong Kong Communities must be put at the heart of urban development and planners must consider the impact of a city’s design also on inequality and on human lives From targeting unauthorised fish ball vendors in Hong Kong to hawkers of T-shirts or noodle soup in Bangkok, cities across Asia have continued an on-again-off-again battle to clear streets of unlicensed vendors and free up space for pedestrians. The challenge remains how to do so without undercutting a city’s overall vibrancy and distinctiveness. I am reminded of former First Lady Michelle Obama’s quote from the 2016 Democratic Party convention in Philadelphia. “When they go low, we go high,” she said. That memorable turn of phrase reminds me today less of the ugliness of past political campaigns, and more of both Hong Kong’s and Bangkok’s changing skylines and the struggle to balance and find space for both skyscrapers and street vendors. Indeed, those same words from the former First Lady have relevance – in a different, economic context in both the United States and Asia – as a new Administration in Washington focuses on rebuilding America. US President Donald J Trump is certainly no stranger to skyscrapers. Trump Tower on Fifth Avenue in New York is arguably one of the most famous addresses in the world. In Chicago – site of the world’s first skyscraper – the Trump International Hotel & Tower, completed in 2009, is the second tallest completed building in that city, and the fourth tallest in the United States. The United States long ago ceded the title of world’s tallest building to Asia and the Middle East. Seven of the top 10 tallest completed buildings in the world are now in Asia, according to the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat. This Chicago-headquartered not-for-profit organisation founded in 1969 maintains The Skyscraper Center, a database on the world’s tallest buildings. As of March 2017, the world’s tallest buildings are the Burj Khalifa in Dubai at 2717 feet, the Shanghai Tower in China at 2073 feet and the Makkah Royal Clock Tower in Mecca, Saudi Arabia, at 1972 feet, according to the Skyscraper Centre. Coming in at number four is 1 World Trade Center in New York at 1776 feet. Hong Kong boasts the eighth tallest building – the International Commerce Centre. In Southeast Asia, the tallest buildings are Kuala Lumpur’s Petronas Twin Towers; the Keangnam Hanoi Landmark Tower, in Vietnam; and Bangkok’s recently completed MahaNakhon tower – all at more than 1,000 feet tall. Cities across Asia are growing outwards and upwards at breakneck speed, with the World Bank forecasting decades of urban growth to come. Despite almost 200 million people already having moved to Asia’s cities in the first decade of the 21st century, the region’s ongoing urbanisation is likely only to intensify. Liveable cities, however, need more than skyscrapers. The people, the street life, and the neighbourhoods at the bottom of the buildings must not be lost in the shadows of new development. That remains a particularly critical point as city planners across Asia, including in Bangkok, unintentionally or not make it much tougher for street vendors, street-side tailors and cobblers, push carts and food trucks to make a living. As cities build taller, they must keep three key benchmarks for liveability in mind – community, resilience and sustainability. First, communities must be put at the heart of urban development. Urban planners must consider not only the impact of a city’s design and new construction on traffic efficiency or parking spaces, but also on inequality and on human lives. Amidst the rush to maximise real estate returns, developers must also incorporate public, open spaces to build a sense of community, cultivate street life and encourage social interaction. And that fostering of community should ideally include people from all walks of life and income levels. Second, cities must build in resilience. A society or city that is socially inclusive and with strong community bonds leads to a city that is also resilient. An initiative of the Rockefeller Foundation, 100 Resilient Cities, defines urban resilience as the capacity to survive, adapt and grow no matter the stresses or shocks they experience. Beyond skyscrapers, cities must build in comprehensive security and rule of law, effective public health systems, inclusive housing and labour policies, and diverse transport networks, as well as effective delivery of emergency services. Here, the private sector, including insurance and reinsurance companies, will play a necessary role along with government policies to encourage an enabling environment for resilience. And third, cities need to grow in an environmentally sustainable manner. With more and more people moving into cities, tackling environmental challenges is already increasingly an urban issue. Incorporating innovations and technologies in areas such as infrastructure, energy and transport will be essential to building smarter if not “smart cities.” Here again, the contributions and coming together of public, private and not-for-profit sectors will be important. There are many ways to measure a city’s success. At the Milken Institute, where I serve as that non-partisan economic think tank’s inaugural Asia Fellow, our researchers since 1999 have used a comprehensive, fact-based set of criteria to rank 200 large and 201 small metros across the United States as part of an annual Best-Performing Cities index. The economic outcomes-based index heavily weights growth in employment, wages and technology. More subjective metrics such as quality-of-life and cost-of-living are not included. This past year, tech still drove the top rankings as cities that exceled in innovation again topped the index, with San Jose, California, in Silicon Valley, claiming the No 1 spot for the second year in a row. A similar Milken Institute Best Performing Cities China list based on official Chinese economic, jobs, wage growth, foreign direct investment and other data singled out Shanghai, Guiyang and Zhoushan as top performers. Certainly, not all cities are blessed with the resources that Silicon Valley’s urban areas or Shanghai have as they too face the growing physical, social and economic challenges that are a part of an increasingly urbanised 21st century. But today, amidst the diversity of the world’s changing urban landscapes, on one point there should be agreement. Liveable, dynamic and vibrant cities are greater testament to a country’s prosperity and policy successes than any number of skyscrapers, no matter how big or how tall. As the United States rebuilds and cities in America and across Asia build higher, it is what is sustained below that will matter most. Curtis S Chin is a former US Ambassador to the Asian Development Bank. -- © Copyright Reuters 2017-03-26
  4. THAILAND LIVE

    EU leaders seek unity in Rome, despite Brexit and protests By Jan Strupczewski and Isla Binnie EU leaders stand inside Orazi and Curiazi hall during their meeting on the 60th anniversary of the Treaty of Rome, in Rome, Italy March 25, 2017. REUTERS/Remo Casilli ROME (Reuters) - Leaders of the European Union met in Rome on Saturday to celebrate the 60th anniversary of the bloc's founding treaty and demonstrate that the EU can survive the impending departure of major power Britain. Full story: http://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/975414-eu-leaders-seek-unity-in-rome-despite-brexit-and-protests/
  5. EU leaders seek unity in Rome, despite Brexit and protests By Jan Strupczewski and Isla Binnie EU leaders stand inside Orazi and Curiazi hall during their meeting on the 60th anniversary of the Treaty of Rome, in Rome, Italy March 25, 2017. REUTERS/Remo Casilli ROME (Reuters) - Leaders of the European Union met in Rome on Saturday to celebrate the 60th anniversary of the bloc's founding treaty and demonstrate that the EU can survive the impending departure of major power Britain. Under heavy security as the Italian capital braced for anti-EU protests and the risk of attacks such as that by an Islamic State follower in London last week, the 27 national leaders gathered in the Campidoglio palace where the six founding states signed the Treaty of Rome on March 25, 1957. Conspicuous by her absence was British Prime Minister Theresa May, who will write to EU summit chairman Donald Tusk on Wednesday formally to announce that its second-biggest economy will leave the Union in negotiations over the coming two years. Britain shunned the new European community at its creation, but finally joined in 1973. Its people voted to quit last June. Tusk, a former Polish premier, recalled his own life in war-ravaged Gdansk, shut in behind the Iron Curtain, to remind the leaders of the Union's achievements and urge them not to let it descend into petty squabbling and bureaucracy. "Why should we lose our trust in the purpose of unity today? Is it only because it has become our reality? Or because we have become bored or tired of it?" he asked, taking a dig at his own nationalist-minded domestic rivals, now ruling in Warsaw. "Europe as a political entity will either be united, or will not be at all ... The unity of Europe is not a bureaucratic model. It is a set of common values and democratic standards." BREXIT BLOW Without the so-called Brexit, it might have been a modestly hopeful summit in the palazzo where old foes France and Germany, with Italy, the Netherlands, Belgium and Luxembourg, signed the original treaty; all 28 EU economies are growing after a slump that has blighted the past decade and recent border chaos has largely abated as refugees are, for now, being held in check. But Brexit has undermined the self-confidence of a Union that has helped bring peace and growing prosperity to the continent, and has encouraged eurosceptic nationalists challenging governments from Stockholm to Sicily. It has also amplified the petty frictions among the more than two dozen national governments and obliged leaders' aides to water down a grand birthday declaration of unity. After days of carping from Poland and Greece, seeking to show home voters they were getting Brussels to give assurances about equal treatment and social welfare, the Rome Declaration the 27 will sign just before noon (1100 GMT) offers ringing phrases about peace and unity. "We have united for the better," the text concludes. "Europe is our common future." But it may disappoint those who think more ambition and coordination is the answer to the malaise. The declaration promises to listen to citizens. But locked away behind rings of armed police, the leaders may hear little of what thousands of protesters have to say on Saturday. For Ernesto Rapani, an official of Italy's right-wing eurosceptic Fratelli d'Italia party attending a demonstration in Rome, the bloc's trade and financial rules were skewed in favour of Germany and had to change: "At the moment the union is convenient for Germany and not Italy," he said. At the Vatican on Friday, Pope Francis told EU leaders that their Union had achieved much in 60 years but that Europe faced a "vacuum of values". He condemned anti-immigrant populism and extremism that he said posed a mortal threat to the bloc. -- © Copyright Reuters 2017-03-26
  6. THAILAND LIVE

    Hong Kong chooses new leader amid accusations of China meddling By James Pomfret A protester holds up a yellow umbrella, the symbol of the Occupy Central movement, as she marches to demand universal suffrage in the Chief Executive election in Hong Kong, China March 25, 2017. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu HONG KONG (Reuters) - A small electoral college began voting for a new Hong Kong leader on Sunday amid accusations that Beijing is meddling and denying the Chinese-ruled financial hub a more populist leader perhaps better suited to defuse political tension. Full story: http://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/975413-hong-kong-chooses-new-leader-amid-accusations-of-china-meddling/
  7. Hong Kong chooses new leader amid accusations of China meddling By James Pomfret A protester holds up a yellow umbrella, the symbol of the Occupy Central movement, as she marches to demand universal suffrage in the Chief Executive election in Hong Kong, China March 25, 2017. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu HONG KONG (Reuters) - A small electoral college began voting for a new Hong Kong leader on Sunday amid accusations that Beijing is meddling and denying the Chinese-ruled financial hub a more populist leader perhaps better suited to defuse political tension. The majority of the city's 7.3 million people have no say in their next leader, with the winner to be chosen by a 1,200-person "election committee" stacked with pro-Beijing and pro-establishment loyalists. Three candidates are running for the top post, two former officials, Carrie Lam and John Tsang, and a retired judge, Woo Kwok-hing. Lam is considered the favourite. Several hundred protesters marched on Saturday denouncing Beijing's "interference" in the election amid widespread reports of lobbying of the 1,200 voters to back Lam, rather than the more populist and conciliatory former finance chief, Tsang. Other democracy activists hung a large, yellow banner from a peak called Lion Rock, overlooking the city, with the slogan, "I want universal suffrage". Security was tight around the harbourfront voting centre with 2,000 or so police officers expected to be deployed in the vicinity in case of unrest. Since Hong Kong returned to Chinese rule in 1997, Beijing has gradually increased control over the territory even though China had promised wide-ranging freedoms and autonomy under the formula of "one country, two systems", along with an undated promise of universal suffrage. Many fear that Lam will continue the tough policies of staunchly pro-Beijing incumbent Leung Chun-ying, a divisive figure who ordered the firing of tear gas on pro-democracy protesters in 2014 and who was not seen to be defending Hong Kong's autonomy and core values. COMPETITION, PRICES The political upheavals with Beijing over the city's autonomy and democratic reforms - that many hoped would have allowed a direct election this time round - have roiled a new generation and weighed on the city's economy, ranked 33rd globally by the World Bank in 2015. Political and social divisions, mainly over democracy and anxieties over China's creeping influence, have dominated political debate leading to some legislative and policy-making paralysis and the stalling of major projects, including a cultural hub and high-speed rail link to China. While Hong Kong's proximity to China has been a boon for the city, bringing in Chinese investment and spending, businesses have also faced growing competition from mainland Chinese firms in core sectors like services and property. Housing prices, now among the world's highest, are widely seen to have been pushed up by an unrelenting wave of buying from rich Chinese, intensifying anti-mainland China sentiment. Many observers, businessmen and politicians have warned Hong Kong can't afford another period of upheaval if it is to regain its former capitalist allure. Beijing's detention of five Hong Kong booksellers in late 2015, and the disappearance of a Chinese billionaire this year, have also undermined confidence in the "one country, two systems" formula. While Beijing has not explicitly backed any candidate, senior officials have stressed certain conditions must be met including a new leader having the "trust" of China's Communist leaders. "Just because a candidate is leading popularity polls doesn't necessarily mean you should vote for (that person)," said outgoing city leader Leung on Friday. For a graphic on candidates in the running click tp://tmsnrt.rs/2mxF5IT -- © Copyright Reuters 2017-03-26
  8. THAILAND LIVE

    After healthcare flop, White House seeks help from Congress on tax By Roberta Rampton President Trump talks to journalist at the Oval Office of the White House after the AHCA health care bill was pulled before a vote, accompanied by U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price (not pictured) and Vice President Mike Pence, in Washington, U.S., March 24, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria (Reuters) - U.S. Vice President Mike Pence on Saturday blamed the U.S. Congress for thwarting a Republican plan to overhaul healthcare law, but acknowledged that the White House will need to work with lawmakers to accomplish its next set of legislative plans. Full story: http://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/975412-after-healthcare-flop-white-house-seeks-help-from-congress-on-tax/
  9. After healthcare flop, White House seeks help from Congress on tax By Roberta Rampton President Trump talks to journalist at the Oval Office of the White House after the AHCA health care bill was pulled before a vote, accompanied by U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price (not pictured) and Vice President Mike Pence, in Washington, U.S., March 24, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria (Reuters) - U.S. Vice President Mike Pence on Saturday blamed the U.S. Congress for thwarting a Republican plan to overhaul healthcare law, but acknowledged that the White House will need to work with lawmakers to accomplish its next set of legislative plans. Speaking to a group of small business owners in Charleston, West Virginia, Pence said President Donald Trump is ready to move on to his next priority: simplifying the tax code and cutting tax rates. "We're going to roll our sleeves up and we're going to cut taxes across the board for working families, small businesses and family farms," Pence said. "Working with this Congress, President Trump is going to pass the largest tax cut since the days of Ronald Reagan, and we're going to get this American economy moving again," he said. Comprehensive tax reform has eluded previous Congresses and administrations since 1986 when it was last accomplished under former President Ronald Reagan. Pence made his comments the day after the Republican-controlled House of Representatives failed to find enough support within its own ranks to pass legislation to roll back Obamacare -- a setback that raised doubts about Trump's ability to deliver on other big promises requiring help from Congress. Trump and Republicans had campaigned to overhaul former President Barack Obama's health care law, which they have argued is too intrusive and expensive. "As we all learned yesterday, Congress just wasn't ready," said Pence, who spent a dozen years in Congress starting in 2001, and has been a key emissary for Trump on Capitol Hill. "With 100 percent of House Democrats -- every single one -- and a handful of Republicans actually standing in the way of President Trump's plan to repeal and replace Obamacare, we're back to the drawing board," Pence said. On tax reform, Pence said Trump wants to cut the corporate tax rate to 15 percent from 35 percent to spur investment. The House of Representatives' tax committee is working on legislation that would cut the corporate rate to 20 percent. Pence said the White House also would seek to work with Congress to boost funding for the military, roll back regulations on the energy sector, and confirm Judge Neil Gorsuch, Trump's pick to fill a vacancy on the Supreme Court. Standing with Linda McMahon, who started and ran World Wrestling Entertainment before being named as head of Trump's Small Business Administration, Pence joked that the White House could use some muscle to work with lawmakers. "Maybe we could have used a few of your WWE superstars on Capitol Hill yesterday," Pence said. -- © Copyright Reuters 2017-03-26
  10. THAILAND LIVE

    With healthcare bill dead, U.S. Republicans turn to taxes By David Morgan House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin Brady (R-TX) speaks with the media as he arrives for the Republican policy luncheon on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., U.S., March 14, 2017. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein WASHINGTON (Reuters) - After failing to repeal Obamacare, Republicans in the U.S. Congress quickly pivoted on Friday to President Donald Trump's next priority: overhauling the federal tax code, but their plan has already split the business community. Full story: http://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/975409-with-healthcare-bill-dead-us-republicans-turn-to-taxes/
  11. With healthcare bill dead, U.S. Republicans turn to taxes By David Morgan House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin Brady (R-TX) speaks with the media as he arrives for the Republican policy luncheon on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., U.S., March 14, 2017. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein WASHINGTON (Reuters) - After failing to repeal Obamacare, Republicans in the U.S. Congress quickly pivoted on Friday to President Donald Trump's next priority: overhauling the federal tax code, but their plan has already split the business community. Division among Republicans was the chief cause of the embarrassing setback on Obamacare, and similar fault lines have been evident for months in the Republicans' tax plan, mainly over an untested proposal to use the tax code to boost exports. House of Representatives tax committee Chairman Kevin Brady conceded the demise of a Republican plan to roll back Obamacare could make the path to tax reform harder. "This made a big challenge more challenging. But it’s not insurmountable," he told Fox News after Ryan cancelled a vote on an Obamacare rollback bill. But Brady said he and House Speaker Paul Ryan are all-in on tax reform. Brady said House Republicans plan to begin moving on tax reform this spring and to pass legislation before Congress's summer recess in late July. "We’re going to work with the administration to get this done,” he said. Trump has been unclear about his position on the most problematic feature of the House Republicans' tax "blueprint," a proposal known as the border adjustment tax that would cut taxes on exports and raise them on imports. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said on Friday that tax reform in many ways is "a lot simpler" than healthcare reform. "We're able to take the tax code and redesign things and I think there is very, very strong support," Mnuchin said at an event hosted by news website Axios. Comprehensive tax reform is a policy goal so complex that it has defied successive Congresses and presidents since 1986 when it was last accomplished under former President Ronald Reagan. The U.S. tax code is riddled with narrow subsidies and loopholes, many of them deeply embedded in the economy and defended by the interests they benefit, such as the mortgage interest deduction and the business interest deductibility. Brady's panel has been working on a plan since mid-2016 that would cut the corporate tax rate to 20 percent from 35 percent, end taxing foreign profits for U.S.-based multinationals and cut other tax rates for businesses and investors. The plan has divided businesses, prompting import-dependent industries to warn of higher prices for consumer goods from clothing and electronics to gasoline. Brady has been adamant that border adjustment will be part of the House tax reform, saying earlier this week that the provision was "a given" for final legislation but would include a transition period for import-heavy industries. -- © Copyright Reuters 2017-03-26
  12. THAILAND LIVE

    Thousands demonstrate in London against leaving the EU Demonstrators hold banners during a Unite for Europe march in central London, Britain March 25, 2017. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls LONDON (Reuters) - Thousands of people marched through London on Saturday to protest against Britain leaving the European Union, just four days before Prime Minister Theresa May launches the start of the formal divorce process from the bloc it joined 44 years ago. Full story: http://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/975407-thousands-demonstrate-in-london-against-leaving-the-eu/
  13. Thousands demonstrate in London against leaving the EU Demonstrators hold banners during a Unite for Europe march in central London, Britain March 25, 2017. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls LONDON (Reuters) - Thousands of people marched through London on Saturday to protest against Britain leaving the European Union, just four days before Prime Minister Theresa May launches the start of the formal divorce process from the bloc it joined 44 years ago. The Unite for Europe march was due to end with a rally in Parliament Square, scene of this week's attack by British-born Islam convert Khalid Masood in which four people died. Marchers observed a minute's silence in memory of the victims at the start of the demonstration. In bright sunshine, they waved EU flags and banners with slogans like "So what's the Plan" and "Stop Brexit" as they made their way to parliament. One banner from a marcher in Hastings on the south coast - scene of England's epoch-defining defeat to William, Duke of Normandy - read: "Hastings, in Europe since 1066." Another simply said "Happy Birthday EU" in a reference to this weekend's 60th anniversary of the bloc's founding, currently being commemorated in Rome. Joss Dennis was one of three coach loads of protesters who had travelled from Bristol in western England, which voted 62 percent to stay in the EU in last June's referendum compared with the national 52-48 percent vote to leave. "With such a close vote, I don't see how anyone can call this the will of the people," she told Reuters. "We have so much to lose: environmentally, politically and financially. "A terrible mistake has been made but the situation is not beyond redemption," she added. May has been adamant she intends to take Britain out of the EU following the referendum and will formally announce the start of the two-year leaving process on Wednesday. -- © Copyright Reuters 2017-03-26
  14. THAILAND LIVE

    Dustin Johnson through to Match Play semi-finals Mar 24, 2017; Austin, TX, USA; Dustin Johnson of the United States plays against Jimmy Walker of the United States during the third round of the World Golf Classic - Dell Match Play golf tournament at Austin Country Club. Mandatory Credit: Erich Schlegel-USA TODAY Sport (Reuters) - World number one Dustin Johnson stayed on track to become the first player to win all four World Golf Championships events when he advanced to the semi-finals at the WGC-Dell Match Play in Texas on Saturday. Full story: http://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/975406-dustin-johnson-through-to-match-play-semi-finals/
  15. Dustin Johnson through to Match Play semi-finals Mar 24, 2017; Austin, TX, USA; Dustin Johnson of the United States plays against Jimmy Walker of the United States during the third round of the World Golf Classic - Dell Match Play golf tournament at Austin Country Club. Mandatory Credit: Erich Schlegel-USA TODAY Sport (Reuters) - World number one Dustin Johnson stayed on track to become the first player to win all four World Golf Championships events when he advanced to the semi-finals at the WGC-Dell Match Play in Texas on Saturday. Johnson lost three consecutive holes during his quarter-final against Alexander Noren, but had enough in reserve to secure a 3&2 victory over the Swedish eighth seed at Austin Country Club. Next up for the American top seed is a Sunday morning semi-final against Japanese 54th seed Hideto Tanihara, while Spaniard 21st seed Jon Rahm and American 42nd seed Bill Haas meet in the other semi. The final will be played in the afternoon. "It's a long way to go but I like my chances," Johnson told NBC television after dusting off Noren. “I gave him a hole there (by hitting into a water hazard on the 11th) and on 10 missed a short putt, but other than that I played really solid, drove it well, hit some good iron shots and rolled some nice putts in.” A victory on Sunday would make Johnson the only player other than Tiger Woods to win consecutive World Golf Championships events, after his Mexico Championship triumph three weeks ago. Giant killer Tanihara, a 14-times winner on his home tour, earned a spot in the final four with an emphatic 4&2 win over Englishman Ross Fisher. Even if he goes no further, Tanihara has already achieved his objective of qualifying for the Masters in two weeks. He started the week ranked 60th in the world, but is now assured of jumping into the top 50 and punching his ticket to Augusta. “My goal was to get to the Masters. I’m really happy,” he said. Haas, meanwhile, took out five-times major winner Phil Mickelson 2&1 in an all-American quarter-final. “Against Phil, I really felt like I needed to capitalise when I had the chances, and I was able to do that,” Haas said. “It’s something I’ll never forget.” Mickelson endured a frustrating afternoon on the greens, but nonetheless sounded satisfied with his preparation for the Masters, where he will shoot for a fourth green jacket. “I didn’t get the putts to go this match the way I had been making them previously and that was the difference,” he said. Rahm made quick work of the other quarter-final, giving Dane Soren Kjeldsen a 7&5 shellacking. Rahm could not remember playing better, except perhaps over the final nine holes en route to his maiden PGA Tour victory at Torrey Pines in southern California two months ago. “I haven’t played 13 holes the way I played today maybe ever,” said the 22-year-old from Barrika in northern Spanish Basque Country. “I missed one shot, the second shot on nine, and every other single shot was pretty much exactly the way I saw it. To play golf like that and make a couple of putts, it was just a perfect round.” -- © Copyright Reuters 2017-03-26