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Rainmaker

Teaching In Chiang Rai

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What qualifications/ certs do you need to teach in Thaiand, is a TEFL ok or do you need a degree?

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A TEFL and being native usually helps when teaching at government schools or private language schools. Universities and some high schools do require a degree and that isn't very strange.

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If you're talking about Mathayom, the patience of a saint.

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It really comes down to demand. In Chiang Rai the demand is fairly high for native speakers and therefor qualifications are not as essential as they are say in Bangkok. Having no qualifications does not mean you wont get a job, it just means you can't be picky and will have to take what you can get.

An example, I used to teach at an International school in BKK years ago, and I was getting 3 times as much as I get here in Chiang Rai. The options here in Chiang Rai are very limited and wages are much lower. I work with teachers who are not qualified and they get around the same amount of money here in Chiang Rai as I do.

I would certainly advise getting one and I heard from a friend that Chiang Mai university offers 1 month TEFL courses.

ITR :o

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But, would a teacher in Chiang Rai who hasn't earned a bachelor's degree, be able to work LEGALLY in the present climate? And if the wages are so low, are they generally even lower than Chiang Mai, which is supposedly the bottom of the barrel?

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But, would a teacher in Chiang Rai who hasn't earned a bachelor's degree, be able to work LEGALLY in the present climate? And if the wages are so low, are they generally even lower than Chiang Mai, which is supposedly the bottom of the barrel?

Dear PeaceBlondie, this is a question difficult to answer for teachers in Chiang Rai as they mostly wouldn't know what teachers get paid in Chiang Mai. So please let us know what you call 'the bottom of the barrel' (nice expression, I didn't know it before).

Maybe you could enlighten us about that.

As far as known to me the English teachers in Chiang Rai have or many years of experience in teaching English and/or they have some form of degree needed.

I know many teachers and I listen sometimes to their conversations. Believe me when I say that they take their task very seriously and that they permanently do all to improve their way of teaching. I admire their dedication and I am sure they do the best thing possible!

If the teachers are working according to the legally defined terms is a question which I can't answer (as little as most of us can), but I am absolutely convinced that we trustfully can leave that question to the Thai authorities involved.

Limbo :o

PS: I have been working voluntarily as a teacher on matayom level in a village school for more than four years. I had no official qualification as a teacher and I am not even a native speaker, but I am sure that if the head of school, the Thai English teachers or the students wouldn't have appreciated what I did, I would have been 'out' within the shortest time.

Again: I think the English teachers within our expat community deserve praise!

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PS: I have been working voluntarily as a teacher on matayom level in a village school for more than four years. I had no official qualification as a teacher and I am not even a native speaker

Limbo, we admire your contribution to the community. Unfortunately if you are currently being paid for the voluntary work you have been doing or in fact using the word 'work' in the description of what you do at the school and don't have any qualifications to teach then 'officially' you are one of those currently being targeted by the crack down.

Rightly or wrongly, you are an illegal doing illegal activities in Thailand.

I personally hope someone has the sense to look in a different direction when they decide to poke their head in your school to see what that foreign person is doing in there...

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Limbo, the expat teachers in the Chiang Rai community have earned respect, and they deserve respect.

Teachers just starting out in Chiang Mai, in recent years, have taken full time positions for as little as 25,000 with a bachelor's degree and a TEFL. Teachers are so common here that the good schools can take their pick of the cream of the crop, for 32K per month. A local school manager who recruits teachers said that without a degree, you'd go hungry trying to teach in Chiang Mai.

The times, they are a'changin'. Two men who taught without degrees, and who faked their degree, are now serving three months in Thai prison. Teachers in Bangkok have hid on the roof of the school to avoid the authorities.

Chiang Rai deserves the best teachers. Under the current confusions elsewhere in Thailand, provinces are not going to get the teachers they deserve. I know a long-term farang teacher in CRai who earns about 25,000 less than his wife earns, and she's a Thai teacher!!!

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Dear Casanundra,

The first time I was teaching English (with a Dutch accent) in Chiang Rai was in 1987. At the village school I 'worked' (sorry for the expression :o ) more than ten years ago. By saying that I worked voluntarily I mean to say that I didn't get paid for it.

I did the best I could, but I am sure that the present English teachers of Chiang Rai are doing much better.

I strictly obeyed and obey the laws of Thailand, the country I love. I have allways informed the Immigration Police about my volunteer activities, that became rather diverse during the years passing.

quote name='PeaceBlondie' post='1102562' date='2007-01-26 00:10:22'](Deleted by author)

I really hope that my limited knowledge of the English language is the reason of the fact that your remark can be red as if the Chiang Rai authorities would not fullfil their duties according to the laws of Thailand. If not, you are presenting very serious accusations.

I urgently request you not to do so if you can't substantiate your suggestions.

Limbo

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Teachers just starting out in Chiang Mai, in recent years, have taken full time positions for as little as 25,000 with a bachelor's degree and a TEFL. Teachers are so common here that the good schools can take their pick of the cream of the crop, for 32K per month. A local school manager who recruits teachers said that without a degree, you'd go hungry trying to teach in Chiang Mai.

If you as a teacher want to make more than 25k a month then you should not come to Chiang Rai. I am not a teacher but I have many friends that are teachers with all degrees and experience and I have not heard anyone making any money.

So please don't tell any of the unemployed teachers (backpackers?) to go to Chiang Rai! They are not going to make any money here!

:o:D :D

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I've taken the liberty of clearing some dross out of this thread; also, as we already have an entire Teaching In Thailand section I'm renaming this thread the "Teaching In Chiang Rai" thread. Please keep discussion of teaching here at least nominally related to Chiang Rai, thanks.

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Limbo, with my understanding of the law, you do seem to be working illegaly, but you are not the only one, for sure. Been that way here for at least the last twenty years... It seems that immigration doesn't realy feel to concerned about you now, but that can change, as I have seen a few times... And also the work permit folks...

Please take care.

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Like many other people I would like to volunteer my services to various charities or schools in Thailand but legally I cannot.

Anyone working, voluntarily or otherwise without a workpermit is breaking the law even if they inform every government official in Thailand.

Do not accept any kind of work without a work permit.

http://www.thaivisa.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=26847

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