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Continuing Study In Thailand


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#26 kenkannif

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Posted 2004-09-07 13:55:32

Sorry I'll try to find you more evidence.

Basically the problem is to teach science here you need a science degree (generally) and possibly a TEFL (you're teaching science but in English, which means quite often you'll need EFL/ESL skills). To teach TEFL you basically need any degree and a TEFL. There's more teachers with the latter than the former, which is why in some ways science teachers are more in demand (and hopefully Phil will back me up on this) than your 'normal' EFL/ESL positions. We recruit and out-source teachers and this has been my experience so far (or at least in the lasy year or so).

And your argument that we can't teach science better than Thais or other Asians. Well half of us can't teach English as well as them sometime......yet they still employ us for more money (you forget the style (looks) over substance (quality) that Thailand is so fond of;)

And of the few peopel you know that taught science here....well when was it? As it's only in the last year or so there's been a greater demand for teachers to hold a TEFL?

My friend and his girlfriend and the other teachers that were recruited must have all been lucky then. It is a good job, his wages are mentioned as you can see.

Basically in the last few years (or last year) there's been so many schools offering bilingual programs that they can't get enough teachers to teach the specific subjects that they're not really too fussed about experience, rather do they hold the correct degree. This applies to many, many subjects that are now taught bilingually!

It's not a theory as far as I'm aware, it's something that is happening now?

But as you say there are no definites and the bilingual programs could go breasts up soon, so yes as you say a specific degree in teaching might be the way forward? Who knows....TiT!

Edited by kenkannif, 2004-09-07 13:56:07.


#27 Ajarn

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Posted 2004-09-07 14:42:14

Okay, because of your insistence that things are different now (and with the credible anecdotal evidence you presented), I cruised through some ajarn.com ads and I believe now you are right. There is more of a demand now for science and math teachers than in years past. A few in tutorial centers, a few in Thai govt schools. Of course, these were all for teaching kids. If you like 'em, great.

Still in the extreme minority when compared to the need for English teachers, but clearly more of a need than I'd seen before.... I stand corrected. I still believe that focusing on English teaching skills will be of most value, but the Science/Math background clearly is now value-added.

http://www.ajarn.com...red.php#1003764

Hey, even Olde Dinosaurs can learn new tricks :o

#28 kenkannif

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Posted 2004-09-07 14:58:08

What a nice man you are! Thanks for being so agreeable!

#29 Ajarn

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Posted 2004-09-07 15:44:18

Thanks for your patient and informed teaching, Ajarn :o

#30 kenkannif

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Posted 2004-09-07 16:10:58

I'm not really a teacher per se (any excuse to use a bit of French!). Thank you for all of your input as well mate!

It's not often you find someone willing to research an alternative viewpoint and be open minded about it!

Edited by kenkannif, 2004-09-07 16:11:38.


#31 Ijustwannateach

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Posted 2004-09-07 16:28:08

^I concur with Ken, above, both on the issue of greater need for EP science teachers AND his positive opinion of Ajarn's character!!!

:o

#32 Ajarn

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Posted 2004-09-07 16:59:31

It's not often you find someone willing to research an alternative viewpoint.....


My plan was to research it to reinforce my position, not yours! :o

#33 bluebear

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Posted 2004-09-07 17:19:38

Richb

I have a friend doing a degree at home with the OU. But, he says its a real bugger to handle the job and the studying. You also need to watch out as some of the courses have residential periods as part of the course. Just check out the OU web site. After graduating, their degree will be as valid as any other uni over here.

To back up Ken, I know a few people that have maths/science degrees and they do tend to get offered more money than "mere" english teachers. But then, that is the situation now. What it will be like in a few years time, who knows? Even so, I would suggest the science degree rather than a general english/business degree if its your intention to teach.

Now, remember the 3 years completion is if you study equivalent to a full time student! If you are planning that with a full time job, I really wish you good luck. A more realistic timescale might be 5-6 years.

Where was your home in the UK? England, Scotland? Have you considered instead of going for the full thing in one go, to go down the Higher National Certificate, Higher National Diploma, Degree route? This way you get a piece of paper after completing each section and you end up with a degree at the end. It means if for whatever reason you decide to drop out you will ( could) have something to show to employers etc ie a HNC rather than just some credits in an uncompleted course.

#34 Kan Win

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Posted 2004-09-07 22:05:04

Okay, because of your insistence that things are different now (and with the credible anecdotal evidence you presented), I cruised through some ajarn.com ads and I believe now you are right. There is more of a demand now for science and math teachers than in years past. A few in tutorial centers, a few in Thai govt schools. Of course, these were all for teaching kids. If you like 'em, great.

Still in the extreme minority when compared to the need for English teachers, but clearly more of a need than I'd seen before.... I stand corrected.  I still believe that focusing on English teaching skills will be of most value, but the Science/Math background clearly is now value-added.

http://www.ajarn.com...red.php#1003764

Hey, even Olde Dinosaurs can learn new tricks  :D

:( :D :)

Thank you Ken for sticking up for me on this one, until you got the old buzzard (joking only Teacher).

Hope you all Kan Win in your lives. -_-

Happy Days :wub:

:o :D :D

Kan Win

#35 Ajarn

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Posted 2004-09-08 18:19:56

Thank you Ken for sticking up
for me on this one, until
you got the old buzzard (joking only Teacher).Posted Image

#36 richb2004

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Posted 2004-09-10 00:14:39

Thanks for the help everyone.

Glad that the disagreement was sorted out without to much upset. :o

#37 taweenit

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Posted 2004-09-12 16:31:06

I think NIDA might also be a good choice for you to consider. I have several friends studying there. It has been ranked by Asia Inc. as the top 6 MBA in Asean. It is the only Thai institute selected by Michael E. Porter to offer his course on Microeconomics of Competitiveness (also teaching at Harvard). As far as I know, its English program is accepting application until the end of September. Maybe you want to check that out NIDA MBA Program

#38 hUsh

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Posted 2004-09-12 20:54:15

Bangkok University's MBA is quite easy. My bf took some classes in the MBA program of Bangkok Uni. I also took some classes in the Undergrad level. I would say that this uni needs a lot of improvement when it comes to course content, level of students and teachers and the standard of teaching.

Now, I am taking some business classes in Assumption (ABAC) University Graduate School. The classes are pretty intensive with a lot of group work. But the school's system is not quite different from Bangkok Uni.

However, both schools are okay and recognized if you're just going stay here in Thailand.

I heard Sasin has the best MBA program in Thailand, but don't know much about it.

#39 ajarnski

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Posted 2004-09-13 05:45:43

I'll also be using my GI Bill for my MAsters in Thailand. BKK Uni will do the paperwork for u. I also took the tour, nice campus....sexy students (not as sexy as Chula girls but will do). But for the easiest and cheapest route...try Ramkamphang (sp). U dont even have to attend the classes if you don't want to as long as you pass the test. The school is designed for working, busy adults. Those are my 2 main choices due to the price and lack of difficulty. I already have a BA from the U.S and to me (hate to say this) but most education in schools is a waste of money.

Most Uni Masters program will be around 25000-40000 baht per semester. Since you'll be getting about $985 per month in GI Bill benefit.....u can pocket a lot of money or just use the money to treat all your cute classmates to dinner and a trip to Phuket once in awhile. Also, once signed up for a program you qualify for a 1 year student visa (which I don't need because I have a Thai ID card/passport also).

Maybe we'll end up in the same class. Just look for the guy not overly concern with his grades :o

Ski....

#40 dr_Pat_Pong

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Posted 2004-09-13 07:39:31

The tops for MBA international programs is probably Chula's Sasin, which is jointly supported by Northwestern and U of Pennsylvania. It is very well established -- maybe twenty years now -- and has a high reputation in Thailand. I know of at least one large multi-national company which sends it's people there to groom them for higher management positions.


Good luck! :o
Sasin

I have an MBA. I wholeheardedly agree that Sasin is the best place in Muang Thai for an MBA or MM. The Kellog influence is a great help too.

#41 Darth Bangkok

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Posted 2004-09-14 15:21:27

I have my MBA from Sasin. The professors are excellent. But the students are inexperienced and very young. Often their only experience is a year or two in daddy's business. Most of what the professors said went over their heads. And the group work is tortuous. I didn't hand in any paper that I was proud of over the two years. At the end, I just wanted to finish and get out of there.

The courses run for five weeks each, so the professors can go back to the US or Europe. Usually you take two courses at a time. Cheating is rampant. I even saw that they stole the Hard Rock Cafe logo to advertise their Halloween party (not sure if its this year's or last's - I saw someone at the gym wearing the T-shirt). We took exams in special rooms where the desks were all spread out.

After listening to days and days of marketing presentations once, myself and another foreigner asked the professor if ANY group had followed the instructions. He said no. So why were they all getting A's and B's? because "I want to get invited back next year"

In the end, it is up to you, how much you get out of it. I have not used my MBA much. I've been teaching, although I did help run the last school I worked at.

But at least your diploma will have the Kellogg and Wharton names on it.

#42 caughtintheact

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Posted 2004-09-14 19:20:37

I completed the MM program at Sasin many moons ago (on the GI Bill), so I cannot address all the comments on the MBA program. However I do recall the professors complaining about the lack of experience on the part of the MBA students. The MM program is a different ballgame, in that the students are either entrepreneurs who have developed (or inherited) thriving businesses, or are sponsored by banks and other major companies and state enterprises. I believe there is still a requirement for 7 years working experience and a bachelor's degree or the equivalent to attend the MM program (the bachelors degree can be in any subject). If you are in your 30's or older this is a better program. A lot of work, but if you intend to live here, then the networking can be very beneficial to your own future, if you are prepared to cooperate and participate. It was to mine.

#43 mijan24

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Posted 2004-11-09 15:05:02

I am of the understanding Assumption University offer a Graduate Diploma in Teaching can anyone offer any comment on, content worth, credibility outside Thailand but in near by countries etc?

#44 geo

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Posted 2004-11-09 19:07:16

Search for a detailed answer to your question on ajarn.com. Wait, that idea will not work anymore.

In response to your question, the Ozzies will accept the course as will various American states. Other countries, I do not know.

#45 Ijustwannateach

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Posted 2004-11-10 08:12:58

It's hard to say WHAT the "real" schools here want- if you're hinting at what International Schools really want, you're asking about a moving target. I think what they really want is for people who live here at the time of application not to apply, no matter how qualified we are. I have yet to hear a simple answer about what the International Schools here want, aside from the "have a degree in education and experience teaching in your home country." In that regard, I don't think any educational degree or experience from any institution outside your home country will be helpful at all, no matter what its quality level is.

If you're asking about its credibility in terms of general acceptability as a degree, I'd guess that it would be quite acceptable in any nearby country. Home countries would look at it with a certain amount of suspicion from unfamiliarity, just as Thailand has to be careful about vetting the degrees we have. It does seem that people who really want to do so can do real coursework at Assumption, even if it's not really required [from what friends of mine who work there say] for most students to do anything else but show up. I've known folks who studied there who did say their educational programs were challenging.

It's also important to find out what you mean by "credible" and for what purpose. A Graduate Diploma in Teaching might be very well, but if the school you want to work at ONLY wants someone with an M.Ed., that wouldn't be very helpful, then, would it? So make sure you know what the place you'd like to go to wants, and then shoot for those credentials, wherever you study.

"Steven"

#46 mijan24

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Posted 2004-11-10 14:33:12

Thanks guys/gals?(Geo & Ijustwannateach).

Geo, I seem to remember you mentioning having attended the said course a year or two ago. I have been away doing other things and was not sure if you had transferred to this forum, so if you have any other tidbits would be happy to hear from you viz here or PM.

Mijan24 :o

#47 geo

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Posted 2004-11-10 19:48:40

Mijan 24,

Yes, I did attend this course awhile back and even managed to graduate. This course does satisfy any requirements that ANY international schools in Thailand or the MOE may require.

I attended various classes that had teachers from RIS, BIS, BPS, TIS, TCIS, Harrow and many more. Or at least this is where the teachers told me they were from. Most I know to be true!

Herein the problem lies. Many 'true' international schools are leary about hiring a local expat even with all of the necessary qualifications. Sexpats, drunks, druggies often come into play. Very difficult area.

While this grad dip is not for everyone it will allow an individual to work in the international circuit and remain in Thailand.

As far as I know it is the only course that is recognized by such schools.

Good luck! Feel free to PM.

#48 phormio

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Posted 2004-11-13 01:53:49

Mijan 24,

Yes, I did attend this course awhile back and even managed to graduate. This course does satisfy any requirements that ANY international schools in Thailand or the MOE may require.

I attended various classes that had teachers from RIS, BIS, BPS, TIS, TCIS, Harrow and many more. Or at least this is where the teachers told me they were from. Most I know to be true!

Herein the problem lies. Many 'true' international schools are leary about hiring a local expat even with all of the necessary qualifications. Sexpats, drunks, druggies often come into play. Very difficult area.

While this grad dip is not for everyone it will allow an individual to work in the international circuit and remain in Thailand.

As far as I know it is the only course that is recognized by such schools.

Good luck! Feel free to PM.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Thanks for the info, I'll check it out when I get there!
There's hope yet for me teaching at the real internationals !
(I consider these to be the creme de la creme of the teaching positions in the LOS).
:o

#49 Ijustwannateach

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Posted 2004-11-16 10:16:02

Still say your best chance at these is to contact the big name schools (Harrow, etc.) before you arrive. Doesn't mean you can't get hired from the ground here, but you have more of a cachet of legitimacy while abroad, fair or not.

"Steven"

#50 phormio

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Posted 2005-06-06 22:21:28

I've got a BS in Electrical Engineering and 42 Semester Hours in Graduate Studies(essentially a masters degree) in Engineering/Physics; however, I don't have a teaching degree nor do I have a teaching certificate.

I've been interviewing with some of the 2nd/3rd tier international schools. When I say international school , I like to think I'm talking about a school that is under consideration for or has been accredited by one of the intnl school accrediting bodies. Accrediting organizations include the European Council of International School (ECIS), the Council of International Schools (CIS), the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC) and the New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC).
In the course of my job search I've been told about a program to obtain a teaching certificate right here in Thailand. Its from Mission College (Muan Lek) and its program is called,

Professional Teacher Education Certificate -- 18 Credit Hours

Has anyone heard of this program or does anyone know anything about it ? Would it help me get into one of the top tier international schools as a science/math/IT teacher?


They offer 6 hour Sunday courses and an internship at a school where you already teach. They have a nursing college/hospital in Bangkok and hold classes there for people living in Bangkok. I was told they set up this program specifically to certify teachers for the international schools, that the progam is approved by the Thai Ministry of Education, and furthermore that WASC is satisfied by teachers coming out of this program (I would love to confirm this independently though).
They have a course starting in August 2005 which I plan on attending; its a good idea for me since I intend to remain in Thailand for the rest of my days.

Links for the college and the program are :

Mission College Home Page

Mission College Programs of Study

Thanks for your suggestions.





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