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Tenderize Beef Minimal Flavor/juice Loss W/o Pounding


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#1 junkofdavid2

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Posted 2008-02-16 12:18:04

How do you tenderize meat with minimal pounding and without adulterating the flavor?

Marinading makes it lose the juices, and the marinade taste also affects the flavor.

Pounding flattens the meat, but I prefer it still a little thick.

I usually like to make beef steak cut into semi-thick cubes to be dipped in really good japanese sauce.

On a budget though... any ideas?

:o

#2 Gary A

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Posted 2008-02-16 12:48:36

How do you tenderize meat with minimal pounding and without adulterating the flavor?

Marinading makes it lose the juices, and the marinade taste also affects the flavor.

Pounding flattens the meat, but I prefer it still a little thick.

I usually like to make beef steak cut into semi-thick cubes to be dipped in really good japanese sauce.

On a budget though... any ideas?

:o


I use green papaya. I slice the papaya about a quarter inch thick and layer it with the beef. I pour water over all of it but a friend told me the water isn't necessary. I haven't tried it without the water yet. I leave it in the refrigerator about three days then cook or freeze it. It does work.

ADDED - I used to put the papaya in the blender with beer but the beer flavor was was quite strong after the beef was cooked and it was messy washing the mush off the beef.

Edited by Gary A, 2008-02-16 12:51:29.


#3 tutsiwarrior

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Posted 2008-02-16 19:48:34

How do you tenderize meat with minimal pounding and without adulterating the flavor?

Marinading makes it lose the juices, and the marinade taste also affects the flavor.

Pounding flattens the meat, but I prefer it still a little thick.

I usually like to make beef steak cut into semi-thick cubes to be dipped in really good japanese sauce.

On a budget though... any ideas?

:o


I use green papaya. I slice the papaya about a quarter inch thick and layer it with the beef. I pour water over all of it but a friend told me the water isn't necessary. I haven't tried it without the water yet. I leave it in the refrigerator about three days then cook or freeze it. It does work.

ADDED - I used to put the papaya in the blender with beer but the beer flavor was was quite strong after the beef was cooked and it was messy washing the mush off the beef.


I have also used the green papaya tenderizing technique but with beef chunks to be used in a curry or braised beef recipies. I just toss in peeled and sliced green papaya with the chunks in a plastic bread bag and leave in the fridge over night. Careful not to leave too long or the meat will turn into mush.

#4 LtLOS

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Posted 2008-02-16 23:08:32

Your title is a bit different from your question. If you are trying to make a steak from top or bottom round, its probably not a good idea. These cuts are normally used in roasts, or other dishes that require braising. If you try and slice a round and pop it on the grill med rare, you'll end up with shoe leather and aint no amount of additive tenderizers are gonna make it anything like a real med rare steak.

Problem is with most of these posts about tenderizing steak is folks trying to Make a silk purse out of a sow's ear...In other words pick the cut for the dish.

#5 Gary A

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Posted 2008-02-18 10:01:43

Your title is a bit different from your question. If you are trying to make a steak from top or bottom round, its probably not a good idea. These cuts are normally used in roasts, or other dishes that require braising. If you try and slice a round and pop it on the grill med rare, you'll end up with shoe leather and aint no amount of additive tenderizers are gonna make it anything like a real med rare steak.

Problem is with most of these posts about tenderizing steak is folks trying to Make a silk purse out of a sow's ear...In other words pick the cut for the dish.


Well Lt.. Some of us have to make do with what we have. I live 150 kilometers from the nearest super store that has Thai French beef and sometimes I wonder about that Thai French because it can also be a tough as shoe leather. I buy the local beef loin and if I don't tenderize it, I can't even chew it. My dog likes it so it's not a total loss. Unless you are fortunate enough to live near a beef importer, I'm afraid you'll have to eat pork and chicken.

#6 lomatopo

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Posted 2008-02-19 12:10:03

Top Round steak should be OK, grilled. Bottom Round is best as a pot roast: low/slow. Many recipes available.

#7 Phil Conners

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Posted 2008-02-19 12:29:00

Milk is a great tenderizer without adding any noticeable flavor.





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