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expatgaz

How To Say "'your Welcome"'

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As above please,written in English Alphabet.

Thanks,

EPG.

Depends on the situation.

1.) If you do someone a small favor such as holding the door for them when their hands are full and they say "thank you - kawb khun krap - ขอบคุณครับ " then it is appropriate to reply with "Mai bpen rai khrap - ไม่เป็นไรครับ" for "you're welcome".

2.) If a shopkeeper, taxidriver or waitress thanks you for payment for something or for a small tip then simply "khrap - ครับ" is sufficient to get across the idea of "you're welcome".

Mai bpen rai can also and frequently is translated as "never mind" or more literally "it's nothing" as well. In most situations where you would use "you're welcome" in English mai bpen rai is probably the common respose.

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I ever heard a Thai woman answered ยินดีคะ (yindee ka) when I said "thank you" to her.

Hence I guess that yindee ka (if said by a female) or yindee khrap (if said by a male) is more appropriate.

Any other suggestion? You are welcome to explain as I am also learning

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I ever heard a Thai woman answered ยินดีคะ (yindee ka) when I said "thank you" to her.

Hence I guess that yindee ka (if said by a female) or yindee khrap (if said by a male) is more appropriate.

Any other suggestion? You are welcome to explain as I am also learning

That's correct too. It's just a slightly different way of saying it. Yindee ยินดี means "glad" as in "Yindee tee dai roojak ยินดีที่ได้รู้จัก means "I'm glad to meet (know) you." So by the woman in your example saying ยินดีคะ (yindee ka) she was sort of saying "glad to help" which can be pretty similar to "you're welcome" in most situations.

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We say "Yindee raap chai" up here in Chiang Mai. Very commonly used but normally in more formal situations; it's use shows your class and respect.

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Yeah Mai Pen Rai would roughly equal da nada in Spanish "It is nothing". "Don't mention it" in English.

If any typos sorry.

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As above please,written in English Alphabet.

Thanks,

EPG.

'cheun crap' also means yindi and sounds nice. Used to offer someone a seat on the bus or invite them in to the house. Said before it means 'I invite' and said after they say thanks 'you are welcome'

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