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kokesaat

Sneeze: "god Bless You"

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When someone sneezes, I've heard some people say พุดโถ on the first sneeze, นะโม on the second, and สังโฅ on the third. I've been told it's the equivalent of "God bless you."

I'm not sure of my Thai spelling or the literal translation. Can anyone help?

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Sounds like something from the cradle or playground, similar to 'once a wish-twice a kiss' can't find any meaning for the components.

It sounds lovely, I hope somebody knows.

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I would say that literally it is: The Buddha, the Dharma, the Sangha [the Buddha, His teachings/the truth, the Buddhist clergy].

It's used in chants, meditation and so on.

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My wife says it's "someone is talking about you". (good)

Second time "someone talking behind your back"

Third time "someone talking bad behind your back"

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Spelling: พุทโธ ทัมโม สังโฆ

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Spelling: พุทโธ ทัมโม สังโฆ

I found something in my prayers for primary school use.

Is it possibly corrupted from this: บทสวดมนต์ไหว้พระประจำวัน (สำหรับโรวเรยนออนุบาล)

This is 'challenge and reply' the heavy type by the leader then the kids reply: พุทธัง วันทามิ ข้าพเจ้าไหว้พระพุทธเจ้า ธัมมัง วันทามิ ข้าพเจ้าไหว้พระธรรม สังฆัง วันทามิ ข้าพเจ้าไหว้พระสงฆ์

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I would say that literally it is: The Buddha, the Dharma, the Sangha [the Buddha, His teachings/the truth, the Buddhist clergy].

It's used in chants, meditation and so on.

While พุทโธ "phut-tho" does mean the Buddha (literally "he who is enlightened") in Pali and สังโฆ "sang-kho" means the community of Buddhist monks, or clergy, นะโม "na-mo" does not mean the Dharma ธัมโม "tham-mo" (the teachings of the Buddha). "Na-mo" means "in homage to ..." (as in "namo tassa bhagavato arahato samma sambudhassa...", homage to the blessed one, the noble one, the fully self-enlightened one...).

I've never heard these spoken after someone sneezes, but then I've never really payed much attention! I will look out for it now and ask about it.

Thanks, interesting topic.

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I would say that literally it is: The Buddha, the Dharma, the Sangha [the Buddha, His teachings/the truth, the Buddhist clergy].

It's used in chants, meditation and so on.

While พุทโธ "phut-tho" does mean the Buddha (literally "he who is enlightened") in Pali and สังโฆ "sang-kho" means the community of Buddhist monks, or clergy, นะโม "na-mo" does not mean the Dharma ธัมโม "tham-mo" (the teachings of the Buddha). "Na-mo" means "in homage to ..." (as in "namo tassa bhagavato arahato samma sambudhassa...", homage to the blessed one, the noble one, the fully self-enlightened one...).

I've never heard these spoken after someone sneezes, but then I've never really payed much attention! I will look out for it now and ask about it.

Thanks, interesting topic.

I've heard พุทโธ ธัมโม สังโฆ regularly [also พระพุทธ พระธรรม พระสงฆ์] but not พุทโธ นะโม สังโฆ, so I assumed the former was what was actually heard. Do you hear the latter sometimes? How would you interpret it?

To be clear, I haven't come across this in relation to sneezing either.

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My wife tells me this is a saying from her childhood......without revealing her age, let's just say it goes back about 50 years.

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Where is she from?

I've never had anyone ever say anything when I've sneezed. It took me awhile to get used to it tbh.

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In the days of my youth days in Vientiane (40 years ago), we would say "yoo heuan" (Thai:อยู่เรือน). Something about keeping the spirits at home? I can't remember. :)

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Where is she from?

I've never had anyone ever say anything when I've sneezed. It took me awhile to get used to it tbh.

She's from Udon. Last night at a dinner party, I asked 3 guests...all middle aged.....each I asked: "If I sneeze and you say 'พุทโธ', and I sneeze again, what would you say?" Two replied "ทัมโม" along with "สังโฆ" for the third sneeze. They said it was taught to them when they were very young, but haven't heard it in recent times. And none could really explain the meaning/purpose, other than to say it's related to prayers.

I suppose the term "God bless you" could be interpreted as 'a prayer', but I think of it as an expression.

As for พุทโธ ทัมโม สังโฆ, I'll keep asking!

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