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Pink And Black Eggs !


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#1 bambob

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Posted 2005-07-02 15:11:26

i was looking round a market and saw these piles of pink and black eggs.
why the colours ?and whats the reason?
1000 years old eggs ?

#2 BambinA

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Posted 2005-07-02 15:44:40

i was looking round a market and saw these piles of pink and black eggs.
why the colours ?and whats the reason?
1000 years old eggs ?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



do u mean, pink shell , and egg = black right?... obout pink color that they dye, maybe it just make a sign..and make em look different from other eggs, im not sure..

yes.."Kai Yeaw Mah" 1000 years eggs

read more detail in Totster's thread

bambi :o
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(from google)

The thousand-year egg or century egg (Chinese:; pinyin: pdn or Chinese:; pinyin: sōnghūadn) is a Chinese delicacy made by preserving duck eggs in a mixture of charcoal and lime for (despite the name) only around 100 days. It is greenish in color, and has a creamy cheese-like flavor and strong aroma.

A common method of creating thousand-year eggs is to place the eggs in a mixture of clay and water; the clay hardens around the eggs, and is said to preserve them well for a considerable time. But another and much more elaborate method is also commonly practiced. An infusion of three pounds of tea is made in boiling water, and to this are added three pounds of quicklime (or seven pounds when the operation is performed in winter), nine pounds of sea-salt, and seven pounds of ashes of burnt oak finely powdered. This is all well mixed together into a smooth paste by means of a wooden spatula, and then each egg is covered with it by hand, gloves being worn to prevent the corrosive action of the lime on the hands. When the eggs are all covered with the mixture, they are rolled in a mass of straw ashes, and then placed in baskets with balls of rice - presumably boiled - to keep the eggs from touching each other. About 100 to 150 eggs are placed in one basket. In about three months the whole becomes hardened into a crust, and then the eggs are ready to eat.

According to a persistent myth, thousand-year eggs are or once were prepared by soaking eggs in horse urine. While theoretically a possible method of preparation urea, like lime, is alkaline this is not practiced today, and the myth may arise from ammonia smell created during some production processes.

A typical way of eating the preserved egg is with rice congee, as in lean pork and preserved egg rice congee (Chinese:; pinyin: pdn shuru zhōu). It is cut into quarters or eighths, and the seasoned marinated lean sliced pork is boiled with the eggs until the meat is cooked in the rice congee. Fried bread known as youtiao is commonly eaten with congee. The Cantonese wrap chunks of this egg with slices of pickled ginger root. It is also eaten alone as a side dish.

Edited by BambinA, 2005-07-02 16:10:11.


#3 drummer

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Posted 2005-07-07 14:11:45

What *I* want to know is how on earth did anyone decide to make 1,000 year old eggs in the first place, much less eat them! :bleagh:

#4 spencerdharmagrafix

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Posted 2005-07-07 19:35:07

i was looking round a market and saw these piles of pink and black eggs.
why the colours ?and whats the reason?
1000 years old eggs ?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

The white eggs are called "Khai Kem" (salty eggs):- they are preserved by burying them under a black earthy soil, i believe that it is some kind of ash.They are delicious, you normally will order one with your curry or rice soup as an extra..rather like we might order an extra fried egg with our breakfast.
the Pink eggs are known as "Khai Yiaw Maa" (Horse Piss Eggs):- this is due to the smell of ammonia that curls under the nostrils when you peel the egg..this is due to the preservation method.They are painted pink in order to be able to distinguish them from the salty eggs..just makes it easier to sort like that. The horse piss eggs are black in colour, the albumen being transparent (although black), and the yolk looks slightly green/black.
These eggs are absolutely delicious in a popular Thai recipe called "Khai Yiaw Maa Tord Bai Grapao" (horse-piss eggs fried with hot basil leaf).
This is different to the fried chilli and basil we have come to know and love as "pad Kapao"..pad Kapao is a stir fry only..this version with the horse piss eggs has the basil leaves fried separately till crispy and sprinkled over the horse piss eggs..the eggs are cut in halves or quarters and deep fried till golden brown and crisp; sometimes a little minced pork is added to the eggs, before topping with the toasted grapao leaves.
Although the black color of the eggs makes many Farang feel anything but hunger, the truth is that these eggs taste fantastic...who dares wins is what i say..next time you go to a street restaurant..or rice soup restaurant, ask for Khai yiaw maa tord bai grapao, and enjoy! you will have the extra satisfaction of seeing the surprise of the thais that a farang might know this recipe..my wife had never heard of it till i introduced it to her, and she is Thai!, so it is not a recipe that all thai people know..but he who does knows that it is a Thai food CLASSIC! regards, Spencer.

Edited by spencerdharmagrafix, 2005-07-07 19:46:00.


#5 spencerdharmagrafix

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Posted 2005-07-07 19:50:16

i was looking round a market and saw these piles of pink and black eggs.
why the colours ?and whats the reason?
1000 years old eggs ?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



do u mean, pink shell , and egg = black right?... obout pink color that they dye, maybe it just make a sign..and make em look different from other eggs, im not sure..

yes.."Kai Yeaw Mah" 1000 years eggs

read more detail in Totster's thread

bambi :o
Posted Image

(from google)

The thousand-year egg or century egg (Chinese:; pinyin: pdn or Chinese:; pinyin: sōnghūadn) is a Chinese delicacy made by preserving duck eggs in a mixture of charcoal and lime for (despite the name) only around 100 days. It is greenish in color, and has a creamy cheese-like flavor and strong aroma.

A common method of creating thousand-year eggs is to place the eggs in a mixture of clay and water; the clay hardens around the eggs, and is said to preserve them well for a considerable time. But another and much more elaborate method is also commonly practiced. An infusion of three pounds of tea is made in boiling water, and to this are added three pounds of quicklime (or seven pounds when the operation is performed in winter), nine pounds of sea-salt, and seven pounds of ashes of burnt oak finely powdered. This is all well mixed together into a smooth paste by means of a wooden spatula, and then each egg is covered with it by hand, gloves being worn to prevent the corrosive action of the lime on the hands. When the eggs are all covered with the mixture, they are rolled in a mass of straw ashes, and then placed in baskets with balls of rice - presumably boiled - to keep the eggs from touching each other. About 100 to 150 eggs are placed in one basket. In about three months the whole becomes hardened into a crust, and then the eggs are ready to eat.

According to a persistent myth, thousand-year eggs are or once were prepared by soaking eggs in horse urine. While theoretically a possible method of preparation urea, like lime, is alkaline this is not practiced today, and the myth may arise from ammonia smell created during some production processes.

A typical way of eating the preserved egg is with rice congee, as in lean pork and preserved egg rice congee (Chinese:; pinyin: pdn shuru zhōu). It is cut into quarters or eighths, and the seasoned marinated lean sliced pork is boiled with the eggs until the meat is cooked in the rice congee. Fried bread known as youtiao is commonly eaten with congee. The Cantonese wrap chunks of this egg with slices of pickled ginger root. It is also eaten alone as a side dish.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

mmmmmm! that looks delicious..is that with the ginger? i never tried this recipe, i only know tord bai grapao, and yam khai yiaw maa...i hope this article will help to make more farang try this recipe, as it is delicious

#6 The Gentleman Scamp

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Posted 2005-07-07 19:55:44

Ahhh, the long awaited 'pink and black egg' topic. :D

The post I always wanted to start when i was in 7-Eleven but forgot about when I was in front of a computer, :o





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