KunMatt

What Level Of Speaking And Writing Thai Are You At?

118 posts in this topic

1. What level are you at?

Levels are hard to measure. What are we measuring it up against? Thais? Foreigners? I agree with one of the posters above that said, the more you learn about Thai, the more your realize just how much there is to learn. I never feel satisfied at the level I am at. I'd say I'm somewhere around 5000 word vocab, can converse in Thai throughout the entire day, am easily understood when I speak, can understand common topics (food, life, etc.) I can watch a Thai movie with subtitles and follow adequately, without subtitles and I have many issues.

2. Can you read and write Thai?

Yes. I learned Thai through a formal setting and reading / writing are my better skills. I often read Thai forums and websites like sanook.com or kapook.com. All my Facebook, Google, etc. are switched to Thai. I chat with Thais every chance I get online and have good flow to the conversations. I have read through some childrens books, many short stories, but never finished a novel yet. I'm thinking of attempting the final Harry Potter book as a New Years Resolution for the beginning of 2013.

3. How long have you been learning for?

3 years. I moved here about 3 years ago and have been studying since I got here.

4. How did you learn?

Studyed 1 year and CMU, 2 years at Pro langauge, and 2 years with a private tutor off and on during that time. I went through Thai books like Thai for Beginners/Thai for Intermediate, etc. I use Gflash+ for new vocabulary which is similar to Anki but free on your ipod. I will add in every word I come across that I couldn't come up with the definition for on the spot. I watch a lot of Youtube Thai videos, started with Thai songs, then shows like Farang Pok Pok, now I'm watching the comedy show เป็นต่อ and Chris Delivery. I watch Thai movies from time to time and some Thai stand-up comedy. I read the news on voathai.com which has articles and sound from the reporter so you can follow along. I will usually read the article, then listen to the reporter read the article while I follow along, then listen a 3rd time with no visual aid.

5. What other languages could you speak before Thai?

English, I learned Spanish for 5 years in school, but it has deteriorated and my Thai ability has quickly surpassed it.

Just wanna say good luck to everyone else out there studying!

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1. What level are you at?

I am able to make myself understood in most everyday situation, like shopping, home repairs, request for things, ordering food in restaurants, fist introduction to family and new people, everyday chit chat. But I can not talk about complicated things like governments, environmental problems, economy etc.

2. Can you read and write Thai?

I can read Thai very well now - but not always understand what its talking about! Writing is OK, but my spelling is bad - both in English and Thai!

3. How long have you been learning for?

About 5 years, but not full time. In the early years it was just using phrase books when I came here on holiday.

4. How did you learn?

I tried CDs, books, private teacher. In the end the thing that really helped and sped up my learning was going the a proper language school. I tried several, some were pretty bad, others boring, and I finally settled on one in Chiang Mai called Pro Language (I can really recommend this one - been there nearly 3 years).

5. What other languages could you speak before Thai?

NONE!!!!

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Hi good morning! This is actually my first time here :) I was looking for Thai forum I could join if ever I need to ask questions about the Thai language since I'm currently studing basic Thai here. So to answer the TS' questions:

1. What level are you at?

Just the basic. I'm currently studying basic Thai, reading, writing and speaking.

2. Can you read and write Thai?

I'm still memorizing the alphabet as we speak :D

3. How long have you been learning for?

5 weeks >_<

4. How did you learn?

I found out that the college I graduated from was offering language classes to working individuals (extramural classes). So I went for it :)

5. What other languages could you speak before Thai?

I'm Filipino, born and raised in the Philippines. I can speak English, and I'm also studying French on the side. So if I become fluent with Thai and French, I'd be able to speak 4 languages :D :D

---

I wanted to learn Thai because I feel like Thailand's my second home. If ever I get a chance to work there, I would do it in a heartbeat :) :)

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Is this question for expatriates only? I lived in Thailand as an exchange student when I was 18. I've been back once for a month but I plan on going back very soon. I joined the forum to ask and answer question about Thai.

1. What level are you at? What levels are there? I am pretty advanced. When In Thailand, I understand 95 percent of everything I hear. About 75 percent of what I speak is understood on a first try, but I know enough Thai to always get what I want to say across, However I am still learning the news paper and philosophy talk. Anything I buy for Farang is always way too basic for me. I would describe my self as advanced-advanced, but how can you tell? I found my best learning resources in Thailand for Thai speakers. I think taking anything lightly can harm the learning process.

2. Can you read and write Thai? I can read and write and a moderate level. In between beginner and advanced. My reading is better than my righting but I started studying the alphabet and tones again this week and it is all coming back very easily.

3. How long have you been learning for? This is another hard question. I was immersed for a year and month considering my second visit. The first visit was now 12 years ago, and the last visit 3. For the first 3 years after my trip i kept in touch over phone and email but lost touch after that. I really never spoke Thai unless I saw Thai people and that was rarely.

4. How did you learn? it may sound like I am bragging but this is the point I want to make about what I have found about learning a language. Immersion is necessary. Language is formed in a culture and being immersed in the culture puts you in the same web that the language grew from. Also I learned by falling in love with the time I had there, the culture and the people. If anyone wants advice on learning I would tell you, to immerse yourself and make sure the people you like the most do not speak english with you, because it will be your interaction with them, and the memories attached that make you remember. It has to be very personal.

5. What other languages could you speak before Thai? Only English.

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  1. My Thai is quite good enough for any talk, never mind if it is a 7/11 cashier, police, or in a business meeting. Sometime Thai are surprised about it.
  2. I can read Thai Language, but I still struggling with writing. To be honest I am not trying hard to write Thai Language. I was always thinking the few word I know are enough, but now I changed my mind and learn with my son. biggrin.png
  3. It took me not very long, already in the first year my thai speaking was very good, reading and writing I started to learn later, but also with the reading I had not so much problems.
  4. My native Language is German and off course I know English too.

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1. What level are you at?
I would say intermediate to upper intermediate.

My vocabulary should be around 4000-5000. The biggest problem is with listening comprehension and with construction of grammatically correct sentences. Speaking is an easier part for me. Almost always can explain to Thais what I want.

2. Can you read and write Thai?
Yes, I can read and write Thai.

3. How long have you been learning for?
2 years and 4 months to be exact.

4. How did you learn?
For the first 6 months I studied how to speak only. All materials provided by school used transliteration. Although many would say that you should learn how to read first I would argue that it might not be true for everyone and certainly not for me. There were lots of mistakes and lots of fun in the first year. Almost all my friends were victims of my experiments with all 5 tones, occasionally calling them either dogs or horses or even worse... But interaction even on a simplistic level kept me motivated.

Learning how to read didn't take long. Around 1.5 months to get most of the rules ingrained in my mind.

After that studied 1 time per week with a tutor for a year or so.

Currently I mostly learn on my own. Spend around 1 hour in the morning reading and learning vocab. In the evening watch some drama or listen to the text that I read in the morning.

Favorite learning resources: Talking Thai Dictionary by Paiboon Publishing, anki (absolutely must!), Benjawan Poomsan (Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced), Practical Situational Thai, Manee Mana, Thai Reference Grammar by Helen James, Pimsleur. Although not a Thai language book it taught me how to memorize any word: Vocabulary Cartoons (SAT word power). "Mnemonics+anki" is the best method I have found to date to learn new words.

5. What other languages could you speak before Thai?
English! )) Seriously. English is my second language. I am Russian native speaker.

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This is a question to KunnMatt. I am curious. If you ask yourself these 5 questions as 2 years ago what would you answer at the moment?

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ID: 83   Posted (edited)

1. What level are you at?

Just leaving beginner level.
2. Can you read and write Thai?

Yes, but i don't understand most of what i read and write cos my vocab is low.
3. How long have you been learning for?

Really only two years of actual study, but started four years ago (for two years a did nothing at all).
4. How did you learn?

Self study. For the past two months i have been studying with a tutor.
5. What other languages could you speak before Thai?

Only my native language.

Edited by Water Buffalo

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1. What level are you at?

Can order food from menus at Thai for Thai and know what I'm getting, buy groceries at markets and ask questions, know weights and names of fruit, vegetables, fish and meats, taxis no problem for a few simple requests and questions, basic conversation- not anything deep mind you- hard to talk about anything other than what's immediately in front of you, can read all the signs in Thailand and Laos and make pretty much the proper sound, know the name of the character and can write it as it's spoken to me, can write swear words in Thai script and can get non-English speaking Thai's to sound like Richard Pryor, or all words for that matter. It's quite fun actually as it operates like a phonetic code rather than the mixed spelling habits of English and produces the sound you write consistently if you understand what you're writing. Best way to describe the level of understanding for me, I still go to the consulate and write the form in my mother language. Be nice to have a separate queue with a sneaky sign for the ones that love it...

2. Can you read and write Thai?

I know the vowel sounds off by heart and what all the consonants represent as English letters when I read the script, you have such a fantastic array of D and T sounds, three P's, a Pb for fish, many S's, a pair of Ch's and a proper Sh sound that most Thai's refuse to pronounce when used in English-speaking context as it's an uncommon sight to be used in their language. The person and the bottle are obsolete. In Lao the Ch for elephant is an X. I know there are classes within the alphabet that add to the tonal range but have not taken the time to remember what they do to the language when it's spoken. The three Mai's (1,2 and 3 to be formal) I know pretty much what they do, the little eight is easy and jattawa is odd. I can write only Thai words from memory and could not write an unknown Thai word from listening, I'd be just guessing but could make it sound close to what I'd heard.

3. How long have you been learning for?

Came here six years ago as a backpacker and ended up with a job in the city of angels, started to memorise characters from number plates and street signs, which are great to try and read because they have the English underneath. Probably took two and a half to three years to consume it all and really memorise the full alphabet, obsolete and rarely used characters and get it right every time.

4. How did you learn?

I really annoyed a lot of women with questions after the inital 'show-off' factor wore off (although this opens up a world of answers in another arena of your life here), work colleagues no shortage of tutorage, A,B,C's, a lot of giggling and fascination to see me want them to correct me so I actually knew what I was doing. Learned from a crumpled dictionary by the legendary author with the German tennis-playing namesake Boris, at home by myself for the most part.

5. What other languages can you speak other than Thai?

Just this one. Colonial Australian.

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ID: 86   Posted (edited)

My problem is that I seem to have hit a plateau; I don't feel like I am learning nearly as much as I used to and it is depressing to be 50 years old and watch my look kreung daughter fly right past me, ridiculing me for mistakes...I think I learn more Thai from watching lakhon these days from any other resource -- but I am not sure if that is a good thing overall.

That said I have spent almost my entire adult life studying Thai and the pursuit has been far more satisfying than when I tried to learn French (six years in junior and senior high, one year in university Quebec where one real douchebag of a teacher from Paris ridiculed me in class and put me off it forever).

Anyway, I think the Thais in general tend to be fantastic teachers and really love it when you can speak Thai well or even just show some effort. I can't count the number of times I have gone into a little shop and you can feel the tension rise as they realize there is a farang in their midst, then it is smiles and relief all around when you say something in fluent Thai.

It is a great feeling and, like just about everything in life, the result is directly dependent on the effort you put into it.

There are so many foreigners in Phuket now who make little or no effort to learn Thai, and I think that is a shame.

I should note that I later found out that most Francophones (outside Quebec and Paris, at least in my experience) are also very appreciative of efforts to learn their language, but whenever I try to speak French now Thai words come out of my mouth. Talk about confusion and embarrassment.

1. What level are you at? Fluent, but far from perfect.

2. Can you read and write Thai? Yes, I can read a menu, newspaper and things like that without much difficulty, but if I venture into other literary realms I find it difficult...like my wife's novels or stuff related to Buddhism, or phasa rajasamnak. I didn't get the tone rules down from the beginning and now suffer as a result. My reading is far better than my writing.

3. How long have you been learning for? 27 years, started a year before I moved over here using an AUA coursebook, some audio tapes and a Mary Haas dictionary (which I still have).

4. How did you learn? I studied at AUA (listening, natural approach) in Bangkok for almost a year until my funds ran out, then started teaching Thai kids English, which I still maintain is the best way to learn by listening.

However, through AUA I also learned a lot of reading phonetically and it wasn't until I was already quite fluent that I started to seriously study reading Thai script. I wish I had begun a lot sooner; I am familiar with the tone rules, but have not mastered them in a practical sense. I think I learned a lot of reading skills just sitting on buses in Bangkok back during the horrible traffic jams of the 90s, just trying to read signs.

When I taught English, and other methods failed, I often tried to write the Thai words that were the equivalents of English words I was trying to get across. I know this is not "Toefl Kosher" (I don't remember Tefl existing back then), but it is a good way to learn spelling, having 20 kids scream at you when you make a mistake can emblazon the correct spelling in your memory.

My big problem now is that I am terrible at typing in Thai, and my Thai handwriting still looks like that of a seven year old, but at least it is legible.

I also learned a lot from former girlfriends, and I had always made it a point never to date girls who insisted on speaking "bar English". It wasn't just out of a desire to learn Thai, but also because listening to pidgin English really grates my nerves.

For my daughter's sake we now have to maintain English as the language of the household, which I think explains in part why I have hit this plateau -- the rest, I am sad to say, is just laziness.

5. What other languages can you speak other than Thai? I can still understand a good deal of French, but when I try to speak it Thai words come out (see above). I would love to learn Patani Malay and improve my understanding of the Southern Thai dialect. Sadly, you don't need it to live in Phuket, which, linguistically, is now more of a colony of Bangkok than part of the South.

I also love it when I get a chance to hear some of the old-timers on the island who still speak the unique Phuket dialect, which is strongly influenced by Chinese, but is rapidly dying out.

Anyway, I will keep trying and it is a lifetime effort for me. Sometimes I have to do public speaking in Thai, so that is a real impetus to keep improving too.

Best of luck to the OP and anyone embarking on this journey; your efforts will be well rewarded.

Edited by phuketsub
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ID: 88   Posted (edited)

Hello everyone

For my opinion, the best and fast way to speak thai fluent is spending lot of time with thai people they you would learn thai quick smile.png

Right now, I am looking for part-time english teacher for a small group of thai teenager. If anyone is willing to teach and no need to have any experience of teaching before, please contact me via PM

This way , you would learn thai in the same time.

Thank you

Edited by SlyAnimal
Edited out contact details, as per board rules. You may contact the poster via PM

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ID: 89   Posted (edited)

After one week, I would say I fluently know about 20 words, but it seems to work for baisc things enough to get by. If all else fails, hand gestures and facial expressions seem to get me by. If nothing works, a smile does the trick biggrin.png

Edited by dude123

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What level? - Beginner and can't really put sentences together yet

Read/Write Thai - Still trying to cement the alphabet into my brain

How long learning for? - 3 months sporadic bursts at home

How did you learn?

- was just using downloaded Alpabets, Consonants, and Vowels charts.

- I really wanted my wife to be a little supportative, but she's too gigiyat to help.

What other Languages?

- just English fluent, and just enough Bahasa and Tagalog, to allow me to drive in Malaysia and the Philippines

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Recently married, and have returned to Thailand a few times with Thai wife.

I'm only beginning the basics of Thai speak, and wonder that if I can't beat them, will I instead join them in using the Farang word myself, when I eventualy become effectively a Thai speaking farang?

I sit day in and day out hearing wife and family/friends chatting on in Thai, the Farang word popping up multiple time every minute.

I'm told it's not me they are talikng about. I reckon it's regular usage may be related also to that there are many words/terms/sayings/names/places etc that the Thai language hasn't a translation for. They therefore name drop the western word, and drop the Farang word in there at the time - a sort of "of it's a falang thing", much like a westerner could say 'oh that's very White of you' when someone shows a bit of courtesy towards you.

I am, like all of you aware that Thais have had the Farang word drilled into them since childhood. I am amazed that a language such as Thai, with its 44 consonants, and so many vowels and tones, and the multitude of words to descibe every different thing under the sun, are so unable to use more than just the one word 'farang' to generalise everything under the sun that is related to westerners/western culture/western everything.

So, here I am, starting to learn Thai by myself. Wife won't help as she is gigiyat to help me.

With a name something like Ross, I am used to being called something like Loss all the time by wife. Though in front of a specific person or two she'll only ever refer to me as the farang.

Even queried why she doesn't help them out by teaching them my name. as she did herself.

"why should I when here Thailand I am powerful and call you what I want - farang farang"

Going back to the reference about thai conversations around me. I try to ask what things are being talked about at the time (not to find out if they are talking about me, to try to associate why the farang word is being slipped into almost every sentence).

Like - say they were talking about kitchenware - in the Philippines all refrigerators are known by the U.S.commercial word 'frigidaire', which is the accepted general word for fridges there. So they might be talking Tagalog "blaa blaa blaa - oh that 'merican word frigidaire blaa blaa etc".

Maybe the same equivalent thing is also occuring in the Thai speak too? almost everything in living modern Thai culture, except for Temple life, has been modernised/altered etc to be more westernised (farangised)

I've lived in Malaysia and noticed similar, that when Malays speak, there are many western terms adopted in their bahasa language, as it is known as a non-technical language.

Anyhow,with all the Thai around me, I am currently enjoying throwing back a lot of farang, farang ba at every chance I get. It is my petty little way of demonstrating to them how silly it is to use the 'one' word 'farang' to describe half of everything under the sun.

Walking down Walkng Street the other day, when I called out a lot louder than usual:

"Farang Farang"

Wife jumps up, luckily, as it has again saved her from being runover by a farang speeding towards her on a motor scooter.

I got scolded for scaring her &lt;deleted&gt;...

...but I saved her skin, and that is all that mattered.

I am yet to hear a westerner fully conversing in Thai.

Can a convert please tell me - If he/she were talking on for the next half hour - is the Farang word used continually by the westerner, or is whatever spoken more articulated to use what ever word should have been used in the first place, had it been a natural Thai speaking the same content?

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http://www.thaipod101.com/

I've been using this podcast to learn some Thai. I like how they talk about the language and break down the parts of speech for better understanding. This podcast has helped me more than anything else.

I live in Nakhon Pathom, near Kamphang Saen, and would like to take some courses in Thai. If anyone knows a good place to go, drop me a line or two, would you? Thanks.

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I would love nothing more than to be fluent in Thai, it would greatly improve my life in Thailand, especially with my future in-laws and family.

I'm usually pretty good at learning new languages; I've lived all over Asia for the last 10 years and always picked up the language in the place I stayed without trying too hard; I could speak enough Mandarin in a supermarket after only being in China for 2 weeks to help out another farang who was having trouble at the till; after a year I could speak good basic Mandarin just from living there. I learnt enough Finnish to be able to converse with my Finnish gf's father after we had stayed with them in Finland for a few months. I could speak enough Russian to get by with my employees when I worked there for a couple of years. All of these are difficult languages for someone who's first language is English but they all came quite easy to me to get to a basic level. For some reason Thai is just not sticking in the same way. After trying hard to learn Thai for a year I still cannot speak as much Thai as I could Mandarin just after being in China for just 2 weeks. I don't know why.

The reason for this thread is basically a confidence boost and to find out what level I can realistically believe to attain by comparing to other members who are going and gone through the same thing I am. When I first started reading this forum I was amazed and impressed by all of the fluent Thai speakers who were writing and translating in Thai script, it still impresses me when members post Thai sayings or poems that they know, and I thought that with enough studying and effort I could be that. However my confidence was rocked when another member in here said he had actively been trying to learn Thai for 30 odd years and after many attempts at lessons and different methods he still couldn't even hold a basic conversation with the 7/11 cashier, at the moment I can imagine I could be that! That almost made me give up and killed off a lot of my motivation. What's worrying is a lot of people agreeing in that thread that Thai is basically an impossible language to be learn for some people.

So, for anyone who is learning Thai or is fluent,

1. What level are you at?

2. Can you read and write Thai?

3. How long have you been learning for?

4. How did you learn?

5. What other languages could you speak before Thai?

For me;

1. My Thai is terrible. Still not even basic Thai. I can ask simple questions and if I'm lucky understand the answer. People are starting to be nice and tell me my Thai is great but I have zero confidence in it right now. I'm starting to be able to understand a couple of words per sentence when other Thais are talking to each so occasionally I can get the context of a conversation but there are times when I just sit there clueless not understanding even one word. Sometimes when I learn a new word and use it all day, a couple of days later it's gone. I never had this problem with any other languages before so my vocab is increasing very, very slowly.

2. I found it relaively easy to learn the Thai alphabet so I can read Thai script but apart from very common words I usually don't know the words that I am reading out. If I'm lucky when reading out the words I will hear and recognise them and then understand the sentence. I have some Thai friends on Facebook so I try to understand their updates and correctly contribute every day, but even words I wrote out a hundred times can still look new to me in the middle of a sentence.

3. Actively just under 1 year. I live in Bangkok most of the time and my Thai hardly improves at all when I am there so it wasn't until I went to stay with my gf's parents in Isaan that I started to really learn any Thai. When I go to Isaan with my gf I pick up 10 times more Thai than in BKK.

4. I have Benjawan Poomsan's "Thai for Beginner's" but I've mostly only been using it as a reference. I used it to learn the Thai alphabet. The bulk of my Thai (which is not much) comes from being in a place where nobody speaks any English, unfortunately they all speak Isaan to each other, but they talk Thai to me. I also have Thai2English software on my laptop which I think is awesome and teaches me a lot as a live dictionary.

5. First language is English. Did advanced French at Uni. Picked up basic Finnish, Madarin and Russian along the way. Can still remember everything I learned about them. Would give up all my knowledge of them all if I could convert it into Thai.

So please, any success stories or failures, at least I can get an idea of what to expect. Any tips would be appreciated too. I know I'm not putting the effort in that I should, I should study my book and CD properly, and I would like to do some real lessons in BKK, I just didn't expect Thai to be so much harder than the other languages I learnt.

1. Speaking Thai

Probably at the level of a 10 year old.

2. Reading and writing

Cannot.

3. Learning Thai

Never had a lesson. Been listening for 6 years.

4. How did I learn

I have only picked it up from conversation and being in a 99.9 percent Thai village.

5. Other languages

French from school. Reasonable.

Issan/Laos. From the village which is actually in Chonburi. Its easier to learn than Thai.

Spanish. Reasonable.

Portugese. Working in Angola.

Myanmar. Working in Thailand.

Cambodian. From the mother in law.

Italian. Skiing trips.

Gaelic. Im Scottish.

English. School.

English and Issan the easiest. Myanmar the hardest.

Sent from my GT-I9300T using Thaivisa Connect Thailand mobile app

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I'm interested in the OP progress after nearly 3 years since last post here.

1. What level are you at?

Intermediate to Advanced. Some subject matter fluent, others nowhere near.

2. Can you read and write Thai?

Read, yes. Write, not so well. Perhaps better than my 7 year old but not nearly as good as her sister in P6.

3. How long have you been learning for?

22 years I guess but at varying degrees.

4. How did you learn?

Books and cassettes at first then immersion with Thai friends who spoke no English. Never been to school.

After about 5 years, got an AUA book to teach myself reading.

5. What other languages could you speak before Thai?

Learned French for 7 years but never could converse.Every time I try to speak it now I use Thai. Still can read Hindi but can't speak. Worked in Finland once and never learned anything.

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1). What level are you?

If talking in terms of speaking about things I'd talk about in English, then nearly fluent. If taking fluency to mean ability to talk about a whole range of topics, then intermediate. I can't talk about engineering or nuclear physics in Thai - and really couldn't in English either (the difference being that in English, at least I know the vocabulary being used).

2). Can you read and write Thai?

Yes.

3).How long have you been learning?

almost 6 years

4). How did you learn?

I learned via books, speaking, and constantly asking "what is this?" or "how do you say this?"

5). Other languages?

American English - native

German - near-native (I miss some cultural references one would have only from living there)

English - near-native

French - advanced

Norwegian - upper beginner/low intermediate (upper intermediate/advanced reading)

Swedish - beginner (intermediate reading)

Spanish - intermediate reading/beginner

Lao - beginner, but by virtue of thai, probably upper intermediate

Slovak - I know some bits and bobs

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1. What level are you at?

Fluent in day to day conversation, but functionally illiterate. On the phone Thai folks think i'm Thai.

I apparently know nothing, if it suits the situation.

2. Can you read and write Thai?

I could write at beginner level, but has no real need to, so didn't bother to go any further.

I can still read at beginner level, but make no effort to go beyond.
3. How long have you been learning for?

First started learning back in the early '80s
4. How did you learn?

5 weeks immersion, with a Peace Corps course, at the end of which I could make and recognise the sounds and Thai alphabet.

Just just doing it after that. Where I lived for the next couple of years English speakers were few and far between.
5. What other languages could you speak before Thai?

Just English……

In my last high school French exam I got 4% for writing my name and partially answering the first question….. then I laid my head down and slept for the next couple of hours.

Growing up in a rural community, I was into my teens before I first knowingly met anyone who was not a native speaker of English.

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hi friends I also interested to leran thai language .

Can someone tell me best medium or coaching for thai language.

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1. What level are you at?

I'd say maybe an intermediate level. I can take part in conversations, generally understand what's being said and follow along. However, I'm still a bit flummoxed by Thai TV and all the vocab in newspapers.

2. Can you read and write Thai?

​Reading and writing Thai is much easier than speaking. I suppose it's because I've gotten a little rusty - haven't been in Thailand for nearly 9 months.

3. How long have you been learning for?

​I'd say on and off for about a year and a half now.

4. How did you learn?

Started learning using Linguaphone Thai and Pimsleur Thai. Later on, my speaking skills vastly improved when I lived out in Thailand for 6 months. Just using the vocab I knew on a day to day basis, following Thaipod101 and looking up unfamiliar words with a dictionary. I barely used English in the area I lived.

5. What other languages could you speak before Thai?

Had a little bit of French, just a year of it as a module at university. I'd flirted with a few languages like Italian and Russian but it never lasted as I didn't really have a real motivation for learning them besides they sounded nice/interesting.

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1. What level are you at?
I'm just a very beginner, I can speak and understand very basic words and phrases. Now I'm at maybe 200 words of passive vocabulary. So conversation in Thai only is not possible at all yet.

2. Can you read and write Thai?
The alphabet was one of the first things i learnt, as I'm a visual learner and need to see word, as from hearing alone some information lacks (when i mishear the tone and vowel length). I can read and write very slowly as long as it are words i know and those follow the rules, but it still causes me headache if read more than short phrases. I really miss spaces between the words, it would make reading a lot easier.

3. How long have you been learning for?
Actively for approx. three month, so i just started now. Before I only picked up a few very frequent words through Thai movies.

4. How did you learn?
I learn by myself through internet resources and practice with my Thai language partners. Also I try to immerse myself by listening Thai radio and music and watch Thai movies, even I understand almost nothing yet.

5. What other languages could you speak before Thai?
As English i learnt the whole school time and Dutch is very similar to my native language German, I can speak both languages fluently. I also learn a year of each French and Russian in school and university, but I almost forgot everything, so both languages are even worse than my Thai now.
I'm learning Mandarin for three years now, I'm fluent in typing and reading pretty much everything, but conversation still causes me trouble. I know approx. 5000 words according to my latest exam, but I can only understand up to 50% when listening, as the number of homophones is pretty high as well as most speakers have an accent and speak very fast. I really feel stuck and unable to improve anymore now.
For some reason I progress in Thai much faster as i did in Mandarin then. Maybe because both languages have similar grammar and structure. I think listening is much easier in Thai as homophones are less and the people tend to pronounce a lot more clearly. So i actually see more chance in speaking conversation Thai anytime in future.

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ID: 100   Posted (edited)

1. What level are you at?

level zero. Only know maybe ten words. If I wrote them for you you wouldn't understand. For me rice is cow and not khao.
2. Can you read and write Thai?

No, but most people around here can't either. I don't even intend to learn. Looks too much like calculus to me.
3. How long have you been learning for?

Almost eight years.
4. How did you learn?

I haven't learned, but I've tried with help from my wife, the internet, thai language apps and listening to Thai TV. My wife says she first learned English listening to cartoons.
5. What other languages could you speak before Thai?

English, German, Spanish

Edited by texan1800
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BANGKOK 28 March 2017 15:06
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