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I Found Some Grape Vines


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#1 Monkeypants

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Posted 2011-07-08 11:22:49

Well after many many months asking at local plant nurseries here in Phetchabun, Yesterday there was a market in the Tesco Lotus carpark and low and behold I found some gape vines.

These are an eating variety, although I have no idea of the names but I believe that I purchased 2 black grape and one red grape.

They have been grafted to (apparently) a wine grape root stock, the plants themselves are about 12 inches high.

I guess i plant them in full sun?

If anyone can give me any advice on growing or any info it would be appreciated.

Thanks

#2 WatersEdge

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Posted 2011-07-08 14:44:23

The vineyard immediately east of the highway
between Chiang Mai and Chiang Rai,
a short distance north of Charoen Resort
uses steel frame clear plastic hoop shelters over the vines,
to keep rain water completely off
then drip irrigation to give the proper amount of water

The are open side, with an open space between rows
so all other climate factors are as before.

Edited by WatersEdge, 2011-07-08 14:45:13.


#3 bina

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Posted 2011-07-08 22:52:49

will pick hubby's brain maybe tomorrow as he is working in large winery vineyards now; (castel winery, israel); all winter he pruned back and cleaned up the vines; they all get drip irrigation, grapes dont need nor do they like tooo much water, makes them big and watery, and they split...
the soil here is alkaline. the growers here plant rose bushes at end of each row cant remember the reasoning...

but being thai, he may just say 'mai son jai' (doesnt pay attention just does what owner tells him to do at any given time... at moment having trouble with local wild life (wild boars, gazelles) eating the stock and causing havoc in the irrigation..

bina

#4 rice555

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Posted 2011-07-09 01:53:56

Hello Bina, the roses are to monitor bug problems.
When I moved out of Nor Calif in the 99, they had
a big problem with the 'spyglass sharpshooter' which
was starting to causing major scare/problem in N Cal
wine grapes. They put roses on the end of rows to
use as bug monitors.
rice555

#5 TPI

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Posted 2011-07-09 16:51:14

I purchased 3 vines last year from a grower in Issan. the vines are about 4-5 years old with very well developed root structure. As I live in Phrae I didn't think I'd have too much trouble with excess rain!

Well, I've found that planting in a well drained spot in full sun doesn't hurt them at all, I've used buffalo manure as a fertiliser and the plants are holding their own...the only problem is a leaf eater that hardly lets the new leaves set, I've sprayed quantities of Neem on all 3 and they are seperated about 100 metres from each other to discourage infestation too no avail. Thank God the buffalo's don't like to eat them!

Best of luck! (all 3 of mine are black type)

#6 Monkeypants

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Posted 2011-07-12 09:09:30

thanks for all the replys
I think i will keep them in a container this first year, and plant out next year

#7 Timthai

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Posted 2011-07-19 20:11:45

Plant them somewhere under shelter where they are not getting direct rain so you can control moisture, but where they can get full sun. They like to stress a bit. Under a south facing awning with some trellising would work, with plenty of mulch. Humidity will be a problem when the fruit sets, so you will need to spray to control mould. Some vintners use milk diluted in water if you want to avoid chemicals. I have no experience with growing grapes here, but you should get enough seasonal variation in Phetchabun for them to get a winter dormant period. After they start to just show signs of new growth appearing, prune them back hard, just after the second nodule on each cane. After the fruit has started to set, you can cut back any of the long, fast growing water shoots with no fruit, as these are consuming nutrients unnecessarily. Keep us posted on your progress.

#8 kandahar

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Posted 2011-07-19 22:35:37

Grapes vines require more iron than a lot of other plants. Old timers bury a bit of rusty iron with the roots when they plant them. You can, however, buy iron supplements for the soil.

#9 Monkeypants

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Posted 2011-07-21 11:28:40

Thanks again,
I will keep you posted.

#10 soidog2

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Posted 2011-07-23 08:49:12

Thanks again,
I will keep you posted.


Bits of advice you got so far are all correct.

Sunny location is a must.
As mentioned, good commercial growers completely cover the vines than irrigate as needed. (you don't need it if it's just for fun.)

Most vines are very forgiving fertilizer wise, composted manure will do nicely along with some foliage spray.
For them to fruit, you will need to induce dormancy. That is achieved by pruning aggressively (according to your trellis system) and removing all left over leaves. Reduce or eliminate watering until new buds appear, than fertilize and water as needed.

I do it only once a year but most growers do it twice for top yields.
Time your pruning for fruit growth during the dry season.

First year, eliminate all berries or just leave one or two bunches. By your third year or so, fruit will be edible.

Good luck

#11 bina

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Posted 2011-07-24 22:56:41

good commercial growers completely cover the vines than irrigate as needed


in israel no vineyard covers and irrigates. its all drip irrigation and barely any. one of the reasons why we went over from apple and plum and cherry trees is due to the severe water shortage here in jersualem area and also less cold winters so dormancy for the trees wsnt enough really for good yield, and also price of picking...

still trying to find p

#12 soidog2

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Posted 2011-07-25 05:33:10

good commercial growers completely cover the vines than irrigate as needed


in israel no vineyard covers and irrigates. its all drip irrigation and barely any. one of the reasons why we went over from apple and plum and cherry trees is due to the severe water shortage here in jersualem area and also less cold winters so dormancy for the trees wsnt enough really for good yield, and also price of picking...

still trying to find p


I should have said "In Thailand", In the rainy season, uncovered vines suffer from fungus and water damage to the young berries.
Israeli winter is cool compared with Thailand, Summer extremely dry, compared again with Thailand, kind of comparing apples & oranges.

Regards, what does "p" mean ??

#13 bina

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Posted 2011-07-29 21:52:42

pi= pictures. the dog stepped on the keyboard and erase a bunch of stuff..

yes, u are correct; weather is different. they dont like being wet.

my husband doesnt seem to really know what he is doing he just does what the vintner tells him to do; cut off branches, do this, do that. at moment fighting war with wild boars and gazelles who are with young babies that they leave hidden in the vinyards; they get stuck behind the fencing once he fences off the area.. animals love young vine leaves as do people. here people steal the leaves for making delicious ethnic foods : stuffed grape leaves with rice and pine nuts and chopped lamb or beef.. with raisins also

bina
israel





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