Neeranam

Let's Learn One Word A Day.

591 posts in this topic

The word today is  ทุก - took every

Here are some examples, adapted from ethaimusic.com

สวยงามกว่าเคยทุกครั้ง (suay ngam gwar keui took krang) = It gets more beautiful every time.

This one is from Palmy's Yahk Rong Dung Dung. Choice!

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Also just a comment Neeranam your excellent thread would be more useful for beginners if you copied the transliterations from www.thai2english.com including tone markers.
Good point Withnail.
QUOTE(Neeranam @ 2005-11-09 19:33:15)

The word today is  ทุก - took every

Here are some examples, adapted from ethaimusic.com

สวยงามกว่าเคยทุกครั้ง (suay ngam gwar keui took krang) = It gets more beautiful every time.

This one is from Palmy's Yahk Rong Dung Dung. Choice!

The first Thai song that I managed to sing all the way through!

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ปกติ bpòk-gà-dtì Usually, normally

Can someone else please give an example sentence using this word?

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ID: 29   Posted (edited)

เขากำลังหายใจเป็นปกติ

kăo gam-lang hăai jai bpen bpòk-gà-dtì

He is breathing regularly.

Taken from http://www.seasite.niu.edu/Thai/TDReader/Reader.htm

Can I ask Neeranam is the idea that you yourself are going to post a word every day or are we all going to take turns. Perhaps we could allocate days to different members.

Edited by withnail

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I used to learn about 5-10 new words a day. Now I'd be lucky to learn that in a week.

How about posting new words every day to help us who are trying to learn.

Maybe for beginners, intermediate and advanced.

Beginner - แปรงสีฟัน bpraeng see® fan - toothbrush

Intermediate - ผลัดวันประกันพรุ่ง plat(l) wan bpra(l) gan prung(f) - to procrastinate

Advanced - สงครามจิตวิทยา song( r) kraam jit wit(h) ta(h) yaa- psychological warfare.

N :o N

This a great idea Neeranam. Thanks for starting it.

I'd prefer if a higher level word were included each day too, as in your original example. Or was a new thread started for that purpose? I couldn't find it.

And let's not spend too much time trying to tell each other exactly how to pronounce each word. Printing these words and asking for a Thai's help could be a good conversation starter. Let's face it, we'll never be able to write exactly as it sounds. But using the thai2english looks like the best alternative.

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Anyone can post the word of the day. How about Withnail tomorrow?

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ID: 32   Posted (edited)

Okay will do :o

Just got to think of a good one now :D

Just thinking, I don't think there's any need for different levels for this. I think word of the day should be exactly that, a random word. There's nothing wrong with a begginer learning a slightly complicated word and there's nothing wrong with someone more advanced using an easy word in a slightly more complicated sentence.

Edited by withnail

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ยังคิดถึงเธอทุกเวลา (yung kit teung ter took wae-la) = I still miss you all the time.

:o Trying to make sense of this sentence.

"Yung"? Isn't it used for strong negation? "Yung mai ow".

"Ter"? In what conext should this one be used?

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ยังคิดถึงเธอทุกเวลา (yung kit teung ter took wae-la) = I still miss you all the time.

:o Trying to make sense of this sentence.

"Yung"? Isn't it used for strong negation? "Yung mai ow".

"Ter"? In what conext should this one be used?

ยัง is a bit of a trap.

In withnail's example, ยัง is actually short for ยังไม่ได้กินข้าว (I have not eaten yet.) and should consequently be translated as 'Not yet.'

But in Neeraram's example above, 'ยัง' does not involve a negation, and in these cases, it means 'still'. In pidjin translation: Still think reach you every time. Normal English: I still miss you all the time.

เธอ is used in songs and poetry meaning 'you'. It is directed at a loved one. Somebody who refers to you as เธอ would refer to him/herself as ฉัน . In real life, you have to be close to each other for this to be proper though.

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ID: 36   Posted (edited)

Sorry for the lazy reply. I always knew that it meant not yet/still but I always took ยังไม่ได้กินข้าว to mean "still didn't eat" or "not yet" in more natural English so effectively it's the same meaning as Neeranam's example.

Am I wrong?

Edited by withnail

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Okay today's word of the day is:

จน

jon

1. [ V ] be poor ; be impoverished ; be broke

เขาเป็นคนจนจริงๆ

kăo bpen kon jon jing-jing

He is a really poor personใ

2. [ CONJ ] until ; till ; to the point of

เมาจนไม่รู้ว่าตัวเองทำอะไรลงไป

mao jon mâi róo wâa dtua eng tam à-rai long bpai

To be so drunk you don't know what you did.

courtesy of www.thai2english.com

พูดจนลิงหลับ

pôot jon ling làp

To speak until the monkey sleeps. (To say to someone who's talking too much.)

And may I nominate meadish for tomorrow's WOTD.

1 person likes this

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ID: 38   Posted (edited)

could I say "pom poot jon ling lap ?

i speak until the monkey speaks?

if i am talking too much.

Edited by toastwars

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I assume this has nothing to do with the "robber" jon? or "K'moi".

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I assume this has nothing to do with the "robber" jon? or "K'moi".

That's right.

Two different words: จน 'jon' and โจร 'john' the latter having a long vowel sound as opposed to former, which has a short vowel sound. (here is a clear weakness in the standard transcription at Thai2English, since the word does NOT sound like the name 'John', neither in Standard American nor in any British dialects I know. You have to realize 'oh' in that system means the same thing as a long vowel.). Both words take the mid tone, though.

The systems I prefer use double vowels to indicate long vowel sounds, so the word would then be transcribed 'joon' - the 'oo' being a prolonged version of a non-diphtonged short 'o' as in British English 'log'.

The word จน that means 'poor' / 'until' has a short vowel sound, the other has a long vowel sound. This distinction between long and short vowels is as crucial as the tones in determining the meaning of a Thai word.

Since English and many other languages do not have this difference in vowel length, it is important to get it right in Thai.

Here's a sentence with both words in:

โจร ที่ ไม่ เก่ง มัก จะ เป็น คน จน

john têe mâi gèng mák jà bpen kon jon

Robber [which/who/that] no skillful like will be person poor.

Unskilful robbers are usually poor (people).

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ID: 41   Posted (edited)

คุณสวยขึ้นเสียจนพวกเราจำไม่ได้

Koon suay® keun(f) sia® jon phuak(f) rao jam mai(f) dai(f)

You're so much more beautiful now, we didn't recognise you!

เคาเมาจนถึงกับเคินไม่ไค้

kao(h) mao jon theung(l) gab(l) duern mai(f) dai(f)

He was so drunk that he couldn't walk

จน here means "so".

I would write the "robber" as "jone" or "joan".

Edited by Neeranam

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Neeranam could you explain the use of เสีย sia and จน jon in your example. Yet another case of I know what they are but don't know why they're there.

Perhaps jown for robber lol

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Is it เสีย as in 'really ; definitely' and จน as in 'so'?

Yes, เสีย emphasizes the "so" :o

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ID: 46   Posted (edited)

Cool, you really do learn something new everyday, but then I suppose that's the point.

I just realised that a problem I have when learning extended sentences like these is that I find them difficult to read because I don't know where to stress the sentence or pause. Does anyone have any advice on this?

By the way Neeranam a minor detail I know but you spelled เค้า wrong. :o

Edited by withnail

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I just realised that a problem I have when learning extended sentences like these is that I find them difficult to read because I don't know where to stress the sentence or pause. Does anyone have any advice on this?
Listen to native Thai speakers.
By the way Neeranam a minor detail I know but you spelled เค้า wrong. tongue.gif

WEll done! you spotted the deliberaqte mistake :o

Actually you can spell it, or pronounce it two ways, I think.

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Ooh I know that one เขา is the correct written form which is pronounced with a rising tone however colloquially it is pronounced with a high tone and therefore can be written เค้า.

My guess though is that this is more of a slang spelling used say in comic books or on the internet and that in writing it should really be written เขา however you choose to say it.

Incidentally in the Becker series of Thai books it is generally written เขา yet transliterated with a high tone.

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For today, how about learning how to say and write 'public holiday', and a closer look at the component parts of the most common expression, which is:

วันหยุดราชการ

วัน หยุด ราชการ

wan yòot râat-chá-gaan

day stop [government/royal/public] service

public/government holiday

"Day when the public services stop (have holiday)"

The most common way of expressing 'being on holiday', 'being off' / 'not working' is with the word 'หยุด' yòod (short vowel, low tone).

If somebody sees you are at home on what would normally be a working day, chances are they will ask you

' วันนี้หยุดหรือ ค่ะ ครับ '

wan née yòod ler khâ / khráp

day this stop [question particle] [polite particle]

Are (you) off today?

A more formal word for 'public holiday' is the following:

วันนักขัตฤกษ วัน นักขัตฤกษ

wan nák-kàt-rík

festival ; public holiday ; seasonal festival ; a festivity ; an annual holiday

Thank you to thai2english.com for translations and Thai spelling. :o

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เกิด / เกิดชึ้น gèrt kêun to happen,to be born, occur, take place

เมืองไทยไม่ค่อยเกิดแผ่นดินไหว

meuang Thai mai(f) koi(f) gèrt pàen din wăi

There aren't many earthquakes(happening) in Thailand.

แถวนี้มีฆาตกรรมเกิดขึ้นบ่อย

tăew née mee kâat-ta-gam gèrt kêun boi

Around here there are a lot of murders.

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BANGKOK 25 March 2017 10:56
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