Jump to content




View New Content Help  
Photo
- - - - -

1.2 Million Thais Are Addicted To Drugs


108 replies to this topic

#101 zippydedodah

zippydedodah

    Last Place Finisher

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 894 posts

Posted 2012-01-23 15:49:19


i would submit that an addict is someone who uses a chemical adulterant (this would include alcohol or cigs) to the point where it has significant (ah yes, the wiggle room) negative impact on their life (could be personal, social, financial, emotional, all of the above) and continues to do so in spite of the continuing negative consequences.
of course, there are a lot of qualifiers in this statement that one can argue about, but you get the gist of the matter.
As for drug laws/rate/reports in other countries, that is all well and good, they are not thailand.
I wrote my master's thesis on an analysis of the dutch approach to drug addiction/treatment and i concluded that for a number of very good reasons, the (apparently) successful dutch model could not work in USA.... so again, culture and custom come into play when dealing with the local issues.
what we can see worldwide, is that decriminalization (not legalization) leads to lower criminal rates (duh), less use of govt jails (freeing up valuable dollars for "treatment" and other socially beneficial programs not even related to substance abuse), better socialization of addicts, better housing rates, better health outcomes, etc...
Personally, i see drug addiction as a public health problem, not strictly a medical one.... for many years i worked creating better alternatives for mentally ill, drug addicted, homeless people (in Berkeley, CA no less...).... thailand definitely has a long way to go and i wonder how they will get there...


Good for a laugh. According to you I would be a addict in the states because of the amount of money I spent on cigarets. A considerable sum of money that left me with out resources for day to day living in that society. Here in Thailand where the cost is so much lower I would not be a addict as the cost is negligible to me.

You are rite about.decriminalization. I believe that Portugal has done that to a large part and has considerable success with it. Even to the point of people using less than when it was illegal. I read a report once that said heron addiction was three parts one part the heron one part the needle and one part the life style.
Not that I agree but room for thought. I knew people who wuld shoot up whiskey.


you are right... place and circumstance indeed affect who is labeled an addict... i would say that if your smoking in USA/Europe affected your financials and your health to the point where it was a constant negative, then yes, you are an addict over THERE, but not an addict here... weird the way that works, huh?
same for my thai MIL... here she joyfully chews beetle nut all day, at no great financial cost, no personal risk and no social disruption... if she tried to do that in USA, she would be declared an addict .....
working in berkeley i often dealt with situations related to circumstance and culture... for instance, the frat boys who drink it up and get busted, perhaps a DUI even, but no injuries, just too much to drink. Do they deserve to be labeled "alcoholic" and placed in a program... ??? a year after university, how many of them are still binge drinking and causing trouble? and yet if they acquire the social stigma of being labeled an alcoholic, it can do great harm to their future...
Portugal, Spain, England, Australia, Switzerland all enjoy the benefits of extensive decriminalization of drugs... i don't know if in my lifetime i will ever see it here in Thailand, but perhaps we will see more western nations moving in that direction...
I once read an article where the thesis was that the "war on drugs" was similar to the war in vietnam, in terms of social dynamics... took a long time to get the USA out of Vietnam ... and will take many more years to get the US out of retribution and revenge (on drug addicts) and into rehabilitation and recovery.

#102 RogueLeader

RogueLeader

    Senior Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 621 posts

Posted 2012-01-24 02:20:10

I read a report once that said heron addiction was three parts one part the heron one part the needle and one part the life style.


Heron addiction is a dreadful thing. Hard to swallow. So many people try to give up without proper preparation, wing it then chicken out, raven mad with the pain.

#103 waza

waza

    Tourist

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,098 posts

Posted 2012-01-24 03:14:13



i would submit that an addict is someone who uses a chemical adulterant (this would include alcohol or cigs) to the point where it has significant (ah yes, the wiggle room) negative impact on their life (could be personal, social, financial, emotional, all of the above) and continues to do so in spite of the continuing negative consequences.
of course, there are a lot of qualifiers in this statement that one can argue about, but you get the gist of the matter.
As for drug laws/rate/reports in other countries, that is all well and good, they are not thailand.
I wrote my master's thesis on an analysis of the dutch approach to drug addiction/treatment and i concluded that for a number of very good reasons, the (apparently) successful dutch model could not work in USA.... so again, culture and custom come into play when dealing with the local issues.
what we can see worldwide, is that decriminalization (not legalization) leads to lower criminal rates (duh), less use of govt jails (freeing up valuable dollars for "treatment" and other socially beneficial programs not even related to substance abuse), better socialization of addicts, better housing rates, better health outcomes, etc...
Personally, i see drug addiction as a public health problem, not strictly a medical one.... for many years i worked creating better alternatives for mentally ill, drug addicted, homeless people (in Berkeley, CA no less...).... thailand definitely has a long way to go and i wonder how they will get there...


Good for a laugh. According to you I would be a addict in the states because of the amount of money I spent on cigarets. A considerable sum of money that left me with out resources for day to day living in that society. Here in Thailand where the cost is so much lower I would not be a addict as the cost is negligible to me.

You are rite about.decriminalization. I believe that Portugal has done that to a large part and has considerable success with it. Even to the point of people using less than when it was illegal. I read a report once that said heron addiction was three parts one part the heron one part the needle and one part the life style.
Not that I agree but room for thought. I knew people who wuld shoot up whiskey.


you are right... place and circumstance indeed affect who is labeled an addict... i would say that if your smoking in USA/Europe affected your financials and your health to the point where it was a constant negative, then yes, you are an addict over THERE, but not an addict here... weird the way that works, huh?
same for my thai MIL... here she joyfully chews beetle nut all day, at no great financial cost, no personal risk and no social disruption... if she tried to do that in USA, she would be declared an addict .....
working in berkeley i often dealt with situations related to circumstance and culture... for instance, the frat boys who drink it up and get busted, perhaps a DUI even, but no injuries, just too much to drink. Do they deserve to be labeled "alcoholic" and placed in a program... ??? a year after university, how many of them are still binge drinking and causing trouble? and yet if they acquire the social stigma of being labeled an alcoholic, it can do great harm to their future...
Portugal, Spain, England, Australia, Switzerland all enjoy the benefits of extensive decriminalization of drugs... i don't know if in my lifetime i will ever see it here in Thailand, but perhaps we will see more western nations moving in that direction...
I once read an article where the thesis was that the "war on drugs" was similar to the war in vietnam, in terms of social dynamics... took a long time to get the USA out of Vietnam ... and will take many more years to get the US out of retribution and revenge (on drug addicts) and into rehabilitation and recovery.

An addict is someone who is controlled by the substance or practice, not if you can afford it or not or if it harms you. For example someone who is addicted to sex, if they use precautions it wont have an effect on their health, except make them fitter. Therefore the measure would be if you could go without, if you can then your in control and its a habit, if you cant then the substance or practice controls you and you are an addict. For example western governments are addicted to the revenue gained from tobacco and alcohol taxes, they know they cause major harm to their citizens and are the biggest cost in health care but they cant give them up. Same as illicit drugs are illegal only if they are not produced by pharmaceutical companies, remeber the legally sell, cocaine, marijuana, speed and opiods.

#104 axact

axact

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 189 posts

Posted 2013-02-02 15:48:42

A lot of work has to be done in the anti drug war. Even those who say that they only use occaisionally need treatment of some kind or another before they move from just being 'weak willed' persons to outright addicts.
There's no doubt, anyone stupid and weak enough to dabble in drugs are just climbing aboard the slippery slide to being a full addict !


What absolute rubbish, having reach my middle years & taken various drugs without getting on any slippery slide & know of many other occasional drug users in the same position i can safely say you are talking out of your a-s.

So please prove your ridiculous statement that everyone who has tried drugs is stupid weak and bound to become an addict. Thats like saying anyone who drinks alcohol is going to become an alcoholic

I suspect this sancitmonious poster probably has an excess drink problem and smokes but of course that being legal is fine. The fact that those two vices kill and ruin many peoples lifes than illegal drugs do. Hope you don't mind me making this wild statement but why should you have an exclusive on judging people.

Please, if you know nothing about the subject don't bother posting these sort of statements.

Edited by axact, 2013-02-02 15:53:47.


#105 hellodolly

hellodolly

    hello dolly

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14,151 posts

Posted 2013-02-02 17:24:17


A lot of work has to be done in the anti drug war. Even those who say that they only use occaisionally need treatment of some kind or another before they move from just being 'weak willed' persons to outright addicts.
There's no doubt, anyone stupid and weak enough to dabble in drugs are just climbing aboard the slippery slide to being a full addict !


What absolute rubbish, having reach my middle years & taken various drugs without getting on any slippery slide & know of many other occasional drug users in the same position i can safely say you are talking out of your a-s.

So please prove your ridiculous statement that everyone who has tried drugs is stupid weak and bound to become an addict. Thats like saying anyone who drinks alcohol is going to become an alcoholic

I suspect this sancitmonious poster probably has an excess drink problem and smokes but of course that being legal is fine. The fact that those two vices kill and ruin many peoples lifes than illegal drugs do. Hope you don't mind me making this wild statement but why should you have an exclusive on judging people.

Please, if you know nothing about the subject don't bother posting these sort of statements.


Very well put many people go through a stage in life where it would look like to an outsid viewer they are addicts. Make no mistake about it alcohol is a drug. But most of them grow out of it as they mature and will only use socially.

However there is about 10% of the population who for one reason or another continue and come to the point where they do not want to use any more but can't stop. Many of them are far from weak people. The addiction is in control no matter how much they don't want it and fight it.

For these people there are many treatment centers with a varying degree of success. Religion has helped some and there are many anonymous programs to help them on an on going life.

#106 waza

waza

    Tourist

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,098 posts

Posted 2013-02-22 12:21:47

 

 



2% of the Thai population are drug addicts. speaks volumes


This is tiny compared to the number of addicts in the USA.

 

Australia and New Zealand have the highest rates of habitual marijuana use in the world, doesnt seem to affect our society too much. I believe that drugs are a medical problem not a legal one and should all be treated like alcohol and caffeine and nicotine.

 


And is habitual marijuana use legal in Australia and New Zealand then? Have you taken a look at your society - preferably without the marijuana?

 

Marijuana isnt illegal in South Aus its prohibited, that means you get an on the spot fine if your caught with it.  A bit like littering.



#107 Deserted

Deserted

    Senior Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 776 posts

Posted 2013-02-22 19:25:25

I wonder if we will ever see an article concerning police who sell drugs. 



#108 mrfill

mrfill

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 202 posts

Posted 2013-02-23 17:51:23

Isn't there an ongoing study being undertaken to examine the question why there are so may Thais get addicted to amphetamines. IIRC they are looking to see if there is a genetic link to these addictions.


My guess on why so many get addicted to amphetamines is simply that they are what is widely available in Thailand - and cheap too. If they had cheap Ecstasy available as they do in much of the western world, then you can bet there would be lots of people using that...

Oh, the human condition... find a remote tribe that has never had contact with the outside world and you can bet they have some form of drug use too!

 

Your guess is half right. Availability of yaba is high but cheap? At 200Bt+ per tablet (Bangkok prices), it is not cheap. Cannabis availability outside the tourist areas is very low, partly because it is regarded as very 'low class'.

It is also quite easy to get caught using yaba as the Bangkok police regularly set up 'road blocks' for pedestrians in known areas and perform random urine tests on passing people.



#109 RogueLeader

RogueLeader

    Senior Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 621 posts

Posted 2013-03-14 21:44:52

If you can't afford a few beers a day, you look for a cheaper alternative. White spirit maybe or a joint, you need something if there is nothing in your life, It all comes back to economics.


I tend to the notion that stupidity and lack of education are at fault. Surely booze and drugs do nothing to improve anybody's quality of life and anybody with an ounce of common sense recognises this. Addicts are similar to people in a hole, and they keep on digging. More fool them.

 

A glass of wine or whisky does nothing to improve anyone's quality of life?

 

Are you sure? 50 million French, Spanish and Italians might disagree.







Sponsored by ...

Quick Navigation  View New Content Site search: