Jump to content




View New Content Help  
Photo
- - - - -

Smoke, Smog, Dust 2012 Chiang Mai


933 replies to this topic

#376 Priceless

Priceless

    Super Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,490 posts

Posted 2012-03-02 15:00:12



Slightly bored of dust levels , I pulled another high stat. off the chart
http://aqmthai.com/
Numbers for NO2 - these are x10-20 those of other areas being 42-70 ppb in Chiang Mai
However these are in ppb

Found a conversion rate of times 1.91 to put into micrograms per cubic metre which pollutant levels seem to normally be measured in. (there is a longer equation haven't tried that)
http://forum.onlinec...read.php?t=9436

According to this , this would put NO2 levels in Chiang Mai at around 80-130 µg/m3

"There is some evidence that long-term exposure to NO2 at concentrations above 40–100 µg/m3 may decrease lung function and increase the risk of respiratory symptoms.
Nitrogen dioxide is a large scale pollutant, with rural background ground level concentrations in some areas around 30 µg/m3, not far below unhealthy levels."

According to this an NO2 level of over 100 is off the stratosphere and pretty poisonous. Any thoughts on this.


It is worth noting the expression 'long-term exposure'. The World Health Organization has the following to say about short-term exposure:

'The current scientific literature has not accumulated evidence to change from the WHO guideline value of 200 μg/m3 for
1-hour nitrogen dioxide concentration'. (Air Quality Guidelines, Global Update 2005, p376)

/ Priceless


Those are the 1 hour average figures and if you look at those statistics on for example the Australian permitted levels. It says the 1 hour average should be only permittable for 1 day per year.
We are clearly exceeding that at present

Averaging time Maximum concentration (µg/m3) Goals within 10 years Maximum allowable exceedences 1 hour 246 (0.12 ppm) 1 day a year 1 year (State of Victoria)


Yes, I don't intend to argue with you. I have concentrated my interest on PM10 and know very little about other pollutants. Just thought I'd add something that I'd come across 'by accident'.

/ Priceless

#377 cheeryble

cheeryble

    Platinum Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,599 posts

Posted 2012-03-02 15:02:45


This year is extraordinary!
[...]


Well not really, I'm afraid. Since the 'Chiang Mai' measuring station suffered a breakdown for four days (25-28 February) I looked at the Uparaj station numbers instead. Of the previous eight years (2004-2011) four had significantly higher February pollution levels than this year (2004, 2005, 2007 and 2009). Two had levels pretty much equal to this year (2006 and 2010). Only 2008 and 2011 were significantly better.

I think what we are facing is the human tendency to remember more recent events (in this case 2011) a lot more strongly and think that these events are the norm. The latter half of February and most of March are usually bad and (so far) this year has followed that pattern.

I'm crossing my fingers that the pattern will be broken this March Posted Image

/ Priceless


Hi Priceless
As a student of the mind I'm with you on the human tendencies to forget the past and emphasise the present....however in this year's case it's the number of affected people I personally meet regularly which to me is extraordinary.
I know anecdote is not the gold standard, but two more people are now added to the 5 on my sick list.
My 30yo girlfriend has a bad allergic reaction, and Howard Graves is off colour and has just called off all operas for the month.

As for CM residents actually doing something instead of navel gazing....what do you think of a MARCH?
I remember there's a highly respected older Thai activist who has a big network of schoolkids who could perhaps do something.
I know there used to be an activist group about this.....know anything about it?

Cheeryble

Edited by cheeryble, 2012-03-02 15:06:02.


#378 Priceless

Priceless

    Super Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,490 posts

Posted 2012-03-02 15:06:47

ตารางที่ ๑ แสดงค่าเฉลี่ย ๒๔ ชั่วโมงของ PM10และ AQI ในภาคเหนือ ณ เวลา ๐๙.๐๐ น. วันที่ ๒ มีนาคม ๒๕๕๕
สถานี PM10* AQI** คุณภาพอากาศ
เชียงราย
สนง.ทรัพยากรธรรมชาติและสิ่งแวดล้อม.เมือง๒๕๐.๖ ๑๕๗ มีผลกระทบต่อสุขภาพ
สาธารณสุขแม่สาย.แม่สาย.เชียงราย๓๒๓.๔ ๑๘๘ มีผลกระทบต่อสุขภาพ
เชียงใหม่
ศาลากลาง.เมือง.เชียงใหม่๑๗๑.๖ ๑๒๒ มีผลกระทบต่อสุขภาพ
โรงเรียนยุพราชวิทยาลัย.เมือง.เชียงใหม่๑๔๙.๐ ๑๑๓ มีผลกระทบต่อสุขภาพ
พระตำหนักภูพิงคราชนิเวศน์.เชียงใหม่ (Mobile)*** ๓๒. ๔๑ดี
ลำพูนสนามกีฬาอบจ. .เมือง.ลำพูน๑๕๐.๒ ๑๑๓ มีผลกระทบต่อสุขภาพ

Trying to copy this off aqmthai website, doesn't really copy the table but you can get the gist .
Basically all bad but huge difference and improvement up at Phuping if these are correct.


I think that you rather safely assume that the Phuping figures are correct. Doi Pui is at an altitude more than 5,000 feet above mean sea level, and particulate matter pollution rarely reaches that high in any significant concentrations.

/ Priceless

#379 Priceless

Priceless

    Super Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,490 posts

Posted 2012-03-02 15:14:50



This year is extraordinary!
[...]


Well not really, I'm afraid. Since the 'Chiang Mai' measuring station suffered a breakdown for four days (25-28 February) I looked at the Uparaj station numbers instead. Of the previous eight years (2004-2011) four had significantly higher February pollution levels than this year (2004, 2005, 2007 and 2009). Two had levels pretty much equal to this year (2006 and 2010). Only 2008 and 2011 were significantly better.

I think what we are facing is the human tendency to remember more recent events (in this case 2011) a lot more strongly and think that these events are the norm. The latter half of February and most of March are usually bad and (so far) this year has followed that pattern.

I'm crossing my fingers that the pattern will be broken this March Posted Image

/ Priceless


Hi Priceless
As a student of the mind I'm with you on the human tendencies to forget the past and emphasise the present....however in this year's case it's the number of affected people I personally meet regularly which to me is extraordinary.
I know anecdote is not the gold standard, but two more people are now added to the 5 on my sick list.
My 30yo girlfriend has a bad allergic reaction, and Howard Graves is off colour and has just called off all operas for the month.

As for CM residents actually doing something instead of navel gazing....what do you think of a MARCH?
I remember there's a highly respected older Thai activist who has a big network of schoolkids who could perhaps do something.
I know there used to be an activist group about this.....know anything about it?

Cheeryble


I must admit that I somewhat fear the coming March. Luckily, there's not a very strong correlation between the PM10 values for February and for March (0..63 for the 'Chiang Mai measuring station) so I'm still keeping my fingers crossed Posted Image

/ Priceless

#380 MESmith

MESmith

    Platinum Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,947 posts

Posted 2012-03-02 17:17:03

ME and Mrs Smith did a circular hike from Ban Doi Pui up to the peak of Doi Pui at 1685m. Air very clean up at the top. From the view point above Ban Doi Pui, however, I could see that we were still in the smog, as we gazed at light brown haze hiding the view of anything but the nearest ridges, though much better than down at the valley floor. No coughing up there, & no sore eyes. Those returned back on the valley floor. The forest is very green up there. Worth the trip, & will go again soon :)

#381 cheeryble

cheeryble

    Platinum Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,599 posts

Posted 2012-03-02 18:12:50




This year is extraordinary!
[...]


Well not really, I'm afraid. Since the 'Chiang Mai' measuring station suffered a breakdown for four days (25-28 February) I looked at the Uparaj station numbers instead. Of the previous eight years (2004-2011) four had significantly higher February pollution levels than this year (2004, 2005, 2007 and 2009). Two had levels pretty much equal to this year (2006 and 2010). Only 2008 and 2011 were significantly better.

I think what we are facing is the human tendency to remember more recent events (in this case 2011) a lot more strongly and think that these events are the norm. The latter half of February and most of March are usually bad and (so far) this year has followed that pattern.

I'm crossing my fingers that the pattern will be broken this March Posted Image

/ Priceless


Hi Priceless
As a student of the mind I'm with you on the human tendencies to forget the past and emphasise the present....however in this year's case it's the number of affected people I personally meet regularly which to me is extraordinary.
I know anecdote is not the gold standard, but two more people are now added to the 5 on my sick list.
My 30yo girlfriend has a bad allergic reaction, and Howard Graves is off colour and has just called off all operas for the month.

As for CM residents actually doing something instead of navel gazing....what do you think of a MARCH?
I remember there's a highly respected older Thai activist who has a big network of schoolkids who could perhaps do something.
I know there used to be an activist group about this.....know anything about it?

Cheeryble


I must admit that I somewhat fear the coming March. Luckily, there's not a very strong correlation between the PM10 values for February and for March (0..63 for the 'Chiang Mai measuring station) so I'm still keeping my fingers crossed

/ Priceless


No No
I mean what do you think of a march.....a demo....a protesting mob?
Posted Image
Cheeryble

#382 Priceless

Priceless

    Super Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,490 posts

Posted 2012-03-02 18:27:46



I must admit that I somewhat fear the coming March. Luckily, there's not a very strong correlation between the PM10 values for February and for March (0..63 for the 'Chiang Mai measuring station) so I'm still keeping my fingers crossed

/ Priceless


No No
I mean what do you think of a march.....a demo....a protesting mob?
Posted Image
Cheeryble


I understood that perfectly well. However, since people are complaining so much about this past February i thought it relevant to say something about the coming March (i.e. the month).

As for your march, I think that you might irritate a few people. Apart from that, I don't think you will achieve anything. Political demonstrations by foreigners are not that appreciated here, in my experience (though other posters might not agree).

/ Priceless

#383 harrry

harrry

    Star Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,548 posts

Posted 2012-03-02 18:37:59

I can just imagine a group of farangs stumbling along LoyKrau Rd coughing and spluttering.......
On second thoughts that is normal here anyway.

Edited by harrry, 2012-03-02 18:38:14.


#384 T_Dog

T_Dog

    Outside Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,605 posts

Posted 2012-03-02 19:26:24

What were the PM10 levels in CM today? Visibility in Mae Taeng continues to be less than 2 km in the morning, but the winds cleared things up in the afternoon. Had quite a bit of black soot fall today so the burning is still active. In 2007 there was quite a push by the Public Health department for folks to stop burning and village announcements and forest officials back then spread that word as well. This year there seems to be nothing of the sort even though it is considerably worse.

#385 Priceless

Priceless

    Super Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,490 posts

Posted 2012-03-02 19:48:06

What were the PM10 levels in CM today? Visibility in Mae Taeng continues to be less than 2 km in the morning, but the winds cleared things up in the afternoon. Had quite a bit of black soot fall today so the burning is still active. In 2007 there was quite a push by the Public Health department for folks to stop burning and village announcements and forest officials back then spread that word as well. This year there seems to be nothing of the sort even though it is considerably worse.


At the 'Chiang Mai' measuring station (near the Provincial Hall) it measured 171.6 µg/m3. Since you are a ways north of town, it might be more relevant to look at Chiang Rai at 250.6 (or even Mae Sai at 323.4!!!!!).

Please accept my deepest sympathyPosted Image

/ Priceless

#386 chiang mai

chiang mai

    Thai Apologist and Basher

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15,695 posts

Posted 2012-03-02 19:51:38

If you think about how long it's taken to get the current low percentage of motorcycle riders to wear crash helmets, that action invloved passing legislation plus active involvement from the police across the country, all fining helmetless riders on a regular basis - that started some seven years ago and look how far it's got today, does anyone really think that an effective programme aimed at reducing pollution can be enacted in shorter timescales, I seriously doubt it!

#387 T_Dog

T_Dog

    Outside Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,605 posts

Posted 2012-03-02 19:55:03


What were the PM10 levels in CM today? Visibility in Mae Taeng continues to be less than 2 km in the morning, but the winds cleared things up in the afternoon. Had quite a bit of black soot fall today so the burning is still active. In 2007 there was quite a push by the Public Health department for folks to stop burning and village announcements and forest officials back then spread that word as well. This year there seems to be nothing of the sort even though it is considerably worse.


At the 'Chiang Mai' measuring station (near the Provincial Hall) it measured 171.6 µg/m3. Since you are a ways north of town, it might be more relevant to look at Chiang Rai at 250.6 (or even Mae Sai at 323.4!!!!!).

Please accept my deepest sympathyPosted Image

/ Priceless

Thanks Priceless for those rather scary numbers. And regarding sympathy, I didn't even tell you we are camped out in it...... The scourge of the air coming down the mountain at 3 AM is horrible.

#388 Priceless

Priceless

    Super Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,490 posts

Posted 2012-03-02 19:58:58

If you think about how long it's taken to get the current low percentage of motorcycle riders to wear crash helmets, that action invloved passing legislation plus active involvement from the police across the country, all fining helmetless riders on a regular basis - that started some seven years ago and look how far it's got today, does anyone really think that an effective programme aimed at reducing pollution can be enacted in shorter timescales, I seriously doubt it!


I really do hate repeating myself, but the average pollution level in Chiang Mai has been, trend-wise, decreasing by more than a third over the last 7½ years:

Attached File  CM Trend.jpg   119.65KB   21 downloads

/ Priceless

#389 MESmith

MESmith

    Platinum Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,947 posts

Posted 2012-03-02 20:43:53



What were the PM10 levels in CM today? Visibility in Mae Taeng continues to be less than 2 km in the morning, but the winds cleared things up in the afternoon. Had quite a bit of black soot fall today so the burning is still active. In 2007 there was quite a push by the Public Health department for folks to stop burning and village announcements and forest officials back then spread that word as well. This year there seems to be nothing of the sort even though it is considerably worse.




At the 'Chiang Mai' measuring station (near the Provincial Hall) it measured 171.6 µg/m3. Since you are a ways north of town, it might be more relevant to look at Chiang Rai at 250.6 (or even Mae Sai at 323.4!!!!!).

Please accept my deepest sympathyPosted Image

/ Priceless

Thanks Priceless for those rather scary numbers. And regarding sympathy, I didn't even tell you we are camped out in it...... The scourge of the air coming down the mountain at 3 AM is horrible.


Head for higher ground T-Dog, especially if you're camping :(

#390 chiang mai

chiang mai

    Thai Apologist and Basher

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15,695 posts

Posted 2012-03-02 21:38:10

So four years for every 10 micrigrams reduction, at that rate we'll be down to zero in fourteen years, phew, thanks for that, I feel much better and now wont worry nearly so much.

#391 Priceless

Priceless

    Super Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,490 posts

Posted 2012-03-02 21:52:49

So four years for every 10 micrigrams reduction, at that rate we'll be down to zero in fourteen years, phew, thanks for that, I feel much better and now wont worry nearly so much.


Thank you for clearly demonstrating why one should not confuse a trend with a forecast Posted Image For a number of reasons I doubt that we will ever see the average go below ~20 µg/m3, at least in my lifetime (and in my family we tend to become very old).

/ Priceless

Edited by Priceless, 2012-03-02 21:53:13.


#392 elektrified

elektrified

    Platinum Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,609 posts

Posted 2012-03-03 02:06:42

As for your march, I think that you might irritate a few people. Apart from that, I don't think you will achieve anything. Political demonstrations by foreigners are not that appreciated here, in my experience (though other posters might not agree).

/ Priceless

I agree. There were about 25 Burmese demonstrating in front of the Chinese Consulate Thursday morning and about 30 very angry and unfriendly looking police keeping them "under control".

#393 chiang mai

chiang mai

    Thai Apologist and Basher

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15,695 posts

Posted 2012-03-03 04:52:42


So four years for every 10 micrigrams reduction, at that rate we'll be down to zero in fourteen years, phew, thanks for that, I feel much better and now wont worry nearly so much.


Thank you for clearly demonstrating why one should not confuse a trend with a forecast Posted Image For a number of reasons I doubt that we will ever see the average go below ~20 µg/m3, at least in my lifetime (and in my family we tend to become very old).

/ Priceless


Said tongue in cheek of course! But more importantly: do we really understand what the factors are that have allowed the current trend to develop, why exactly has the level of pollution fallen so much for so long, if indeed it has!!

#394 shroomer

shroomer

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 30 posts

Posted 2012-03-03 07:40:03

http://www.guardian....ion-tough-rules

Chinese authorities have set tougher rules to combat air pollution by ordering all major cities to monitor tiny particles that do serious damage to health. One of China's leading environmental activists, Ma Jun, greeted the change as a major step forward.
Surprisingly, given China's strict control of the internet, state media have acknowledged the change is partly in response to online environmental campaigners.
The national air quality rules were agreed at an executive meeting of the state council presided over by the premier, Wen Jiabao, on 1 March, a statement on its website said.
They order stricter air pollution monitoring standards this year in the mega-cities of Beijing, Shanghai, Chongqing and Tianjin, 27 provincial capitals, and three key industrial belts: the Yangtze and Pearl river deltas, and Beijing's hinterland. Another 113 cities must adopt new standards next year, and all but the smallest cities by 2015.
To "help allay public concern over official air quality readings", levels of ozone and PM2.5 particles must be included. PM2.5 particulate matter is below 2.5 micrometres in diameter, or 1/30th the width of an average human hair, and easily penetrates lung tissue.
"This is a major step forward in terms of China's process to combat urban air pollution," said Ma Jun, director of the Institute of Public and Environmental Affairs. "The prerequisite for mobilising our people is to let them know what is going on.
"It doesn't mean that the sky will turn blue automatically because at the end of the day we still need to cut off these emissions."
Following the announcement, more than a million – mostly positive – comments were posted on the Weibo micro-blogging service in under 24 hours. "Good news, applause," wrote Xu Xiaonian, a prominent economist. Others questioned whether the rules would be enforced.
In January, Beijing's environmental agency included PM2.5 particles in its calculations after months of postings from netizens mocking the discrepancy between officially clear days and the dense smog at their windows. Ma said social media had played an essential role in changing government policy last year.
State media also acknowledged the role of bloggers: "A stirring campaign on the country's social network websites since last autumn seemed to have gained a satisfying response from the country's policymakers," Xinhua news agency said.


The question is, when will Thai authorities adopt this monitoring. We have exactly the same problem here, very high PM2.5 levels, and it is not even monitored.

#395 onthedarkside

onthedarkside

    Darth Sidious

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,559 posts

Posted 2012-03-03 08:23:07

Post removed as per rule 31) Bangkok Post do not allow quotes from their news articles or other material to appear on Thaivisa.com. Neither do they allow links to their publications. Posts from members containing quotes from or links to Bangkok Post publications will be deleted from the forum. Please note that this is a decision by the Bangkok Post, not by Thaivisa.com and any complaints or other issues concerning this rule should be directed to them.

#396 Priceless

Priceless

    Super Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,490 posts

Posted 2012-03-03 10:35:54

http://www.guardian....ion-tough-rules

Chinese authorities have set tougher rules to combat air pollution by ordering all major cities to monitor tiny particles that do serious damage to health. One of China's leading environmental activists, Ma Jun, greeted the change as a major step forward.
Surprisingly, given China's strict control of the internet, state media have acknowledged the change is partly in response to online environmental campaigners.
The national air quality rules were agreed at an executive meeting of the state council presided over by the premier, Wen Jiabao, on 1 March, a statement on its website said.
They order stricter air pollution monitoring standards this year in the mega-cities of Beijing, Shanghai, Chongqing and Tianjin, 27 provincial capitals, and three key industrial belts: the Yangtze and Pearl river deltas, and Beijing's hinterland. Another 113 cities must adopt new standards next year, and all but the smallest cities by 2015.
To "help allay public concern over official air quality readings", levels of ozone and PM2.5 particles must be included. PM2.5 particulate matter is below 2.5 micrometres in diameter, or 1/30th the width of an average human hair, and easily penetrates lung tissue.
"This is a major step forward in terms of China's process to combat urban air pollution," said Ma Jun, director of the Institute of Public and Environmental Affairs. "The prerequisite for mobilising our people is to let them know what is going on.
"It doesn't mean that the sky will turn blue automatically because at the end of the day we still need to cut off these emissions."
Following the announcement, more than a million – mostly positive – comments were posted on the Weibo micro-blogging service in under 24 hours. "Good news, applause," wrote Xu Xiaonian, a prominent economist. Others questioned whether the rules would be enforced.
In January, Beijing's environmental agency included PM2.5 particles in its calculations after months of postings from netizens mocking the discrepancy between officially clear days and the dense smog at their windows. Ma said social media had played an essential role in changing government policy last year.
State media also acknowledged the role of bloggers: "A stirring campaign on the country's social network websites since last autumn seemed to have gained a satisfying response from the country's policymakers," Xinhua news agency said.


The question is, when will Thai authorities adopt this monitoring. We have exactly the same problem here, very high PM2.5 levels, and it is not even monitored.


Just one question: How do you know that we have 'very high PM2.5' levels when they are not monitored?

Not that I doubt it. WHO gives a rule of thumb that PM2.5 constitutes about half of the PM10 level ('This ratio of 0.5 is close to that observed typically in urban areas in developing countries', Air Quality Guidelines, Global Update 2005, p277).

USA is one of very few countries (as far as I am aware) where PM2.5 is regularly monitored over large areas and where a limit is in force. I think that since we''re living in a third world country, we''ll just have to accept that our hosts are slightly lagging behind the European Union, which will have a limit starting in 2015.

/ Priceless

Edited by Priceless, 2012-03-03 10:36:37.


#397 siouxzen

siouxzen

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 12 posts

Posted 2012-03-03 12:56:56


If you think about how long it's taken to get the current low percentage of motorcycle riders to wear crash helmets, that action invloved passing legislation plus active involvement from the police across the country, all fining helmetless riders on a regular basis - that started some seven years ago and look how far it's got today, does anyone really think that an effective programme aimed at reducing pollution can be enacted in shorter timescales, I seriously doubt it!


I really do hate repeating myself, but the average pollution level in Chiang Mai has been, trend-wise, decreasing by more than a third over the last 7½ years:

Attached File  CM Trend.jpg   119.65KB   21 downloads

/ Priceless


Again, yearly averages don't tell us the meaningful information we want regarding lung health during this time of year. PM averages most everywhere been trending downward in the past few years thanks to industrial and commercial vehicle and equipment attrition. If you look at the monthly averages and the instances of PM counts break 120 ug/m3 per month, it's evident that the burning season is still problematic and that most regions of Northern Thailand have exceeded the PM10 standards for the US and the EU already this year.

The current state of air quality in Northern Thailand is alarming, regardless of past data. Just because air quality is arguably less bad than it has been in previous years doesn't mean that it is good, especially considering current research on the affect of air pollution on our health. See this article for a good summary of recent studies from the US: http://well.blogs.ny...b-nytimeshealth

As farang, though, our choices are to live with it or move along, and for now I'm still here.

#398 Priceless

Priceless

    Super Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,490 posts

Posted 2012-03-03 13:33:01



If you think about how long it's taken to get the current low percentage of motorcycle riders to wear crash helmets, that action invloved passing legislation plus active involvement from the police across the country, all fining helmetless riders on a regular basis - that started some seven years ago and look how far it's got today, does anyone really think that an effective programme aimed at reducing pollution can be enacted in shorter timescales, I seriously doubt it!


I really do hate repeating myself, but the average pollution level in Chiang Mai has been, trend-wise, decreasing by more than a third over the last 7½ years:

Attached File  CM Trend.jpg   119.65KB   21 downloads

/ Priceless


Again, yearly averages don't tell us the meaningful information we want regarding lung health during this time of year. PM averages most everywhere been trending downward in the past few years thanks to industrial and commercial vehicle and equipment attrition. If you look at the monthly averages and the instances of PM counts break 120 ug/m3 per month, it's evident that the burning season is still problematic and that most regions of Northern Thailand have exceeded the PM10 standards for the US and the EU already this year.

The current state of air quality in Northern Thailand is alarming, regardless of past data. Just because air quality is arguably less bad than it has been in previous years doesn't mean that it is good, especially considering current research on the affect of air pollution on our health. See this article for a good summary of recent studies from the US: http://well.blogs.ny...b-nytimeshealth

As farang, though, our choices are to live with it or move along, and for now I'm still here.


'Again, yearly averages don't tell us the meaningful information we want regarding lung health during this time of year.'

The post that you are replying to had nothing to do with seasonal variations, but rather the long-term trend for air pollution in Chiang Mai. Since you are obviously incapable of understanding the difference between these topics, I'll give you 'the works', i.e.daily, seasonal, yearly and long-term information:

Attached File  Raw data.jpg   151.59KB   7 downloads Attached File  CM Seasons.jpg   105.75KB   11 downloads Attached File  CM Trend.jpg   119.65KB   11 downloads Attached File  CM Monthly & Yearly.jpg   166.18KB   9 downloads

As concerns your earlier expressed disregard for yearly data and limits, you are obviously the greater authority on the subject, having 'worked as environmental consultant focusing on air quality for several years'. However, I would like to quote what the World Health Organization has to say on the subject: 'Based on known health effects, both short-term (24-hour) and long-term (annual) guidelines are needed for both of the PM indicators.' (Air Quality Guidelines - Global Update 2005, p277). 'Both of the PM indicators' refers to PM10 and PM2.5.

/ Priceless

#399 chiang mai

chiang mai

    Thai Apologist and Basher

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15,695 posts

Posted 2012-03-03 13:54:55

"incapable of understanding the difference", it's only early March Priceless hence the burning season and this debate have some way to go, so do try and remain civil with us all!

#400 ludditeman

ludditeman

    Super Member

  • Banned
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,596 posts

Posted 2012-03-03 14:28:23

There is massive burning in the mountains around Doi Suthep, Doi Pui and the HTT lake areas.
In the last week acres of the forest undergrowth has been burnt.





Sponsored by ...

Quick Navigation  View New Content Site search: