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peteratthai

Lifan Cross 200

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Hi to all of you, it nice to be back.

Richard and some other members will remember me as i wrote quite large and detailed threats.

As most of you can remember, i bought my CROSS 200 in Pattaya.

It is in daily use and i will call it only LIFUN. It is a absolute great, fast and very flexible bike for the city and even touring is possible with an average speed between 90 - 100 km/h.

I am happy with it every day and i would not change it to a nuovo or a honda click or similar toys.

It is just the best opportunity for a farang over 75 kg weight.

As well the trips to Bangkok and the Waterfall "PRIU" near Chantaburi was very enjoyable (190km one way).

No problems, no unusual sounds, nothings broken nor heavy vibrations.

If anyone in the area is not sure about just sent me a mail and we can meet, so i can show and explain. (info@esa-th.com)

The CROSS 200 is not a sofa bike. It is a reliable bike with of course some low tech. But nothings wrong with that as long we can relay on the spare parts.

For example, I found it impossible to replace the head light bulb to a brighter one. (non thai market industry standards keeps me depend on LIFAN.

It was not a need yet, the light still working fine, but i like to change to better things some times. There are some other small things, but for a normal user, all no problem.

To Richards thread about TIGER, please send me a personal email and i will inform you about my personal experiences with TIGER, The sales, the TIGER factory, and the actual status of TIGER, as i know.

Just one word to the LIFAN huge factory you mention in a lower post.

I mean i never went to JAPAN to KAWASAKI or to CHINA to LIFAN, so i can not compare that .But i went to both here in Thailand. The factory of LIFAN might be very huge in China, but not the one in Thailand. As you know, i was visiting LIFAN and KAWASAKI at the same day at the eastern seaboard industrial estate and AMATA city. So i know about.

Ok, now i will going out for a little evening ride with my LIFUN.

A good fun and always safe riding to all of you.

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I'll agree with you about the Lifun with one exception. If the back tyre loses any air I get a flat. I think this is a design fault as the puncture always occurs near the valve, like it's been spoked by the wheel, anyone else had this experience?

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Good to know you are enjoying yours, I do believe it is a good little bike, especially for the money. But I hope you never have to rely too much on the service from Lifan. I have had my experience, and now I am searching for a trustworthy non Lifan shop to handle whatever issues I might have in the future.

Have you had your bike off road? Mine really loves to get climbing and tearing up the paths. It takes me back to my highschool days when I even rode my dirtbike to school everyday, and we made our littlle bikes fly like birds out in the sand dunes.

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I'll agree with you about the Lifun with one exception. If the back tyre loses any air I get a flat. I think this is a design fault as the puncture always occurs near the valve, like it's been spoked by the wheel, anyone else had this experience?

Yes

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I'll agree with you about the Lifun with one exception. If the back tyre loses any air I get a flat. I think this is a design fault as the puncture always occurs near the valve, like it's been spoked by the wheel, anyone else had this experience?

You mean the tube get punctured by a spoke and loses air then? Have you ever took a look at the rim inside? Is the rim band (rubber band) missing, out of place or is there a sharp edge at the valve that is causing the puncture? Maybe the tube has been poorly mounted or the tire has been sliped a bit on the rim and there is tension stress at the valve.

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File it down. Can use an angle grinder with a thick disc to save some physical labour.

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File it down. Can use an angle grinder with a thick disc to save some physical labour.

Sorry, i don't understand :)

File what down? You know the cause of these punctures? Spokes too long?

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File it down. Can use an angle grinder with a thick disc to save some physical labour.

Sorry, i don't understand smile.png

File what down? You know the cause of these punctures? Spokes too long?

An angle grinder is the shot. Start at the front and work back. It might take a while but you will end up with a good size pile of recyclable material. biggrin.png

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To Canuckamuck,

yes, surely. You are right.

I do the service by my self, than i know is done in the right way.

If you are not able or willing to so so, you need a trustable and responsible dealer or garage.

Tomorow i am goung to modify the engine with change the carburetor to a better one. If that is succeed and result in more torque, than i will change the rear chain sproket (i gues kawasaki ksr).

the cost was pointed to 4.700,- Baht and nothings original will be modified.

In this, if its not really working i can easy change back by my self.

My aim is a top speed of 130-140km/h for a cruising speed of 120km/h.

Will see how that will works out.

i will keep you informed with details soon.

Have always (LI) fun.

Peter

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Let me know how the carb thing goes, I can only get about 270 k's on a tank right now, so if you don't get a significant power increase, I imagine all you will do is use more gas. Also, I wouldn't really want to run 130 on knobbies, they will be down to nubs in no time and cornering is not this bikes strong suit. But if I was running motard tires, well then that is interesting to me.

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... And void your 2 years' warranty?

They will be happt when they notice a different card next time you have an issue...

Chris

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... And void your 2 years' warranty?

They will be happt when they notice a different card next time you have an issue...

Chris

Easily avoided by putting the standard carb back before going back to the dealer.

The warranty is only in danger if any issue was fuel related anyway.

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Now, the new carburetor is in successful.

The modifications was very little and if some strange things happen it is very easy to change it back.

The power was increased, particular in the middle load and rpm range.

i expecting some more out by playing a bit with the needle position and change the main jet to the 55 size.

we will see.

But at least, the exhaust is more quiet now because the new "cabuu" has an air vent.

Next week i will change the rear wheel sproket so i will get a higher top speed.

At last some new soft grips for the handle bar and that will be all i would do for modification.

A lamb wool skin i ad already on longer trips for more comfort.

I do not expect a much higher consumption as before.

As i do not need a higher power all the time. But is all depend on your driving behavior anyway.

Does anyone consider any kind of oil consumption? I needed to refill twice already. I am scary that that will increase like the other lifan engines of JRD. That will be very bad.

Anyone with LIFUN cross experience please let us know.

Have (Li) fun always.

Peter

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My bike uses up no oil at all.

Please keep us informed on how things progress, and it would be interesting to see how far you can get on a tankful with the new carb and average driving. I am jealous of the reduced exhaust sound, mine pops like warfare when I descend down hills.

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Hi canuckamuck, hi all,

here more details of the changes of the carburetor

the new "cabuu" is in and i think that i got got more of toque.

May some plays with the needle brings even more.

The new cabuu has a 6 mm bigger bore and is a bit longer and higher as the standard one. That makes it necessarily that the air filter has to be modified or fully taken out.

I decided to take it out and replaced it with an sport filter which you can get at any bike modifier shop (may THB 150,-) The standard throttle cable is to short, so it is modified to longer.

I just bought a new original one at the LIFUN dealer for THB 80,-, i case i have to rebuild to original.

There is a s well an adapter from the standard fitting to the new cabuu. In this nothings originally is really modified and it will takes me not longer as one hour by my self to change all back.

I did not measure the consumption yet, but i am quiet sure that may 1/2 liter of a higher consumption will occur.

The next step will be to change the rear sprocket with some less on teeth. The original chain is anyway adjusted three times already, so the taking out of some parts of the chain will nut hurt.

The noise of the exhaust has been decreased markable on the downhill driving because the new cabuu has an air vent. But anyway, sooner or later i will weld an additional 90 or 180 degrees short pice of pipe onto the end of the exhaust. That will silence the thunder storm sound a lot.

HAVE ALWAYS (LI)FUN!!

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Just picked up my Lifan cross 200 for 45,000. ...enjoying it so far! Anybody know of any good trail rides near Buriram?New-Transportation.png

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Congrats, I hope you have some fun with it. I have never been to Buriram so can't help you with that.

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Thanks Canuck,

Has anyone had problems with overheating? I haven't had a problem. Just wondering about running an air-cooled engine in sweltering hot Thailand. Also, just curious, is 45,000 about what people are paying for these (new)? The dealer here wanted 50,000 and came down to 45,000 pretty quickly. Only one place out here sells them, so it's a bit tough to compare prices.

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One more thing...what's with the freaking beeping sound when you turn on the blinkers? I don't really want to start cutting wires on a brand new bike, but that beeping has got to go!

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-I have not overheated mine, but I would never know if it was overheating because there is no gauge. I think the engine is sufficiently air cooled.

-I paid 46,000 for mine a year ago.

- I got the beeping sound turned down, so I can just barely hear it. I tend to forget to cancel my signals so it lets me know. But I sure didn't like having everybody stare at me at the U-turns with the loud beeping.

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Yeah, same with me. Roll up to an intersection, hit the blinker and everyone there turns around and looks at you. I think it's actually kind of dangerous. Anyway, I took the side panels off and found the little beeper box. There is a hole in the side where the air, and sound, flow out. I stuck a piece of double-sided foam tape over the hole. Now it makes just a quiet, lower-pitched beeping sound. Much better!

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Thanks Canuck,

Has anyone had problems with overheating? I haven't had a problem. Just wondering about running an air-cooled engine in sweltering hot Thailand. Also, just curious, is 45,000 about what people are paying for these (new)? The dealer here wanted 50,000 and came down to 45,000 pretty quickly. Only one place out here sells them, so it's a bit tough to compare prices.

Air cooling can be less likely to overheat in hot weather than water cooled. The difference in temperature between ambient air in Thailand and the heat of a radiator in a water cooled bike is small (around 70'C differential), which is why the electric fan cuts in more often to keep it cool, but the difference in temperature between ambient air and the cylinder cooling fins on an air cooled bike is huge (200'C+), so the difference between a hot Tropical summer and cold European winter is not significant for an air cooled motor.

Water cooling has other advantages (more control over cylinder temperature so tighter tolerances are possible, more even cooling to prevent hot spots in the cyclinder ... all these give power and efficiency advantages but at the cost of (a small) increased risk of overheating in hot weather.

An air cooled bike with an oil cooler to keep the oil in good condition is ideal for the tropics, but there's a penalty in power output when comparing like for like engine sizes between air and liquid cooled bikes. So my Keeway RKV200 puts out about the same power as a PCX 150 .... but I know which one I'd choose for a longer ride.

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Thanks, Family. Great info. I figured it would be okay since the bike was made here in Thailand. But when I'm sitting in traffic, have no temp guage, and can feel the blazing engine heat on my legs, I can't help but wonder just how hot the engine is actually getting!

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Sounds ike a fun bike at a good price point

A few questions

Range ?

kpl (what milage are you gettinng

top speed

I do lots of riding and would like to know the numbers

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