Jump to content




View New Content Help  
Photo
- - - - -

Thai Public Health Min: Dengue Fever Situation Worrisome


78 replies to this topic

#1 webfact

webfact

    Admin

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 124,973 posts

Posted 2013-06-03 06:13:43

Public Health Min: Dengue fever situation worrisome
 

df.jpg

file photo 


BANGKOK, 3 June 2013 (NNT) – The Public Health Ministry has expressed its concerns over the dengue fever situation in Thailand as 40 patients have died of the disease this year.

Permanent Secretary for Public Health Dr. Narong Sahametapat said the ministry would keep a close eye on dengue cases, given over 35, 000 people came down with the disease during January 1st to May 29th, 40 of whom died.

 

On an average 2,000 people contact the deadly disease a week, which is very high. He has, therefore, urged all related agencies to step up prevention measures and monitor the situation especially in factory and school areas during the next 90 days, the peak period for dengue fever.

The permanent secretary further revealed that experts had predicted that Thailand would this year see over 100,000 dengue cases, with more than 100 deaths; a 3-fold increase from last year and the highest record of all time.

He has, therefore, urged those who catch the fever to see a doctor immediately as most of those who died did not see a doctor in time.


-- NNT 2013-2013-06-03



#2 NongKhaiKid

NongKhaiKid

    Platinum Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,899 posts

Posted 2013-06-03 06:45:08

The good Dr. says people who catch the fever should see a doctor immediately which raises the point how does the average person know they have the dengue variety ?   I have a friend who is a bit of a hypochondriac and has a fever several times a week but never goes to the doctor,   the expression " fever " covers so much in Thailand.

Recently too the ministry told the nation to get rid of old tyres as they are a breeding ground for mosquitos but why single out tyres,  one of my neighbours has an assortment of crap around the outside of the house, old basins,  uncovered stone jugs and the like,  all of which are full of stagnant water.

Far too often here advice is of the headline grabbing variety as opposed to being practical.



#3 nuananddon

nuananddon

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 86 posts

Posted 2013-06-03 07:15:14

I got dengue fever in Thailand in April. The day I departed (April 30th) I became very sick on the first leg of my flight from BKK to NRT and was nearly pulled off the next leg of the flight to the states. I thought I had food poisoning and just wanted to get home, so I begged the captain not to pull me off the flight. He said OK, but after we takeoff we are not coming back and it is a 13 hour flight, longest day of my life. Back home I spent 5 days in the hospital, at first nobody knew what I had, then a doctor from India recognized the symptoms and the blood tested positive for Dengue. Since then my wife has heard of 8 cases in our small village in central Lampang province.

#4 PoodMaiDai

PoodMaiDai

    Super Member

  • Banned
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,934 posts

Posted 2013-06-03 07:47:56

Like they did with bird flu a few years ago, they will tell you numbers until it gets too high, then it will not be discussed again.



#5 Bellweather

Bellweather

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 463 posts

Posted 2013-06-03 08:06:24

The good Dr. says people who catch the fever should see a doctor immediately which raises the point how does the average person know they have the dengue variety ?   I have a friend who is a bit of a hypochondriac and has a fever several times a week but never goes to the doctor,   the expression " fever " covers so much in Thailand.

Recently too the ministry told the nation to get rid of old tyres as they are a breeding ground for mosquitos but why single out tyres,  one of my neighbours has an assortment of crap around the outside of the house, old basins,  uncovered stone jugs and the like,  all of which are full of stagnant water.

Far too often here advice is of the headline grabbing variety as opposed to being practical.

As I understand it dengue fever has almost identical symptoms to malaria and K. Nuananddon was in hospital for 5 days before it was diagnosed.  As NongKK pointed out the Permanent Secy. to the Health Ministry encourages people with dengue to go to a doctor which would require a complete layman to come up with an accurate self-diagnosis and in any case Thais can't always afford to go to a clinic every time they feel ill.   As is so often the case here things are back to front as the normal routine is to go to a doctor to find out what's wrong,  not to go and tell him.



#6 chiang mai

chiang mai

    Thai Apologist and Basher

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15,721 posts

Posted 2013-06-03 08:16:45

A themometer is invaluble here, anything over 101 and you have a fever, at 102 you need to get to a hospital.



#7 tominbkk

tominbkk

    Platinum Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,432 posts

Posted 2013-06-03 09:09:53

again, it would be nice for the govt to indicate what areas are getting the bites.  I'm sure some parts of Thailand or Bangkok are heavier hit than others.



#8 chainarong

chainarong

    Platinum Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,459 posts

Posted 2013-06-03 09:59:33

Dengue is similar to Malaria, except a bad dose you will  have internal organs hemorrhaging, not to be taken lightly, can kill infants and elderly and if you return home and get sick , tell the doctor where you have been, helps.coffee1.gif  



#9 bunnydrops

bunnydrops

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 478 posts

Posted 2013-06-03 10:20:03

I live 100km north of Korat. People are sent around to check for uncovered containers holding water. Anything that holds water has to be covered or have a net over it. They tip over anything that not covered. This is in a very rural area.



#10 Psych01

Psych01

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 427 posts

Posted 2013-06-03 11:25:36

Here is a link on how Singapore informs and deals with the Dengue Fever issue. It is a government site, not sure if it would be allowed to be posted or not but I will post it anyway.



#11 bri1guy

bri1guy

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 333 posts

Posted 2013-06-03 11:39:23

What about taking Doxycycline Hyclate tablets if in effective areas  same as we do for Malaria prevention??       All standing water should be dumped or treated so this virus cannot effect people..



#12 eggers

eggers

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 75 posts

Posted 2013-06-03 11:46:49

Is there a vaccine to prevent Dengue Fever?

If so, is it available at clinics & hospitals?



#13 chiang mai

chiang mai

    Thai Apologist and Basher

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15,721 posts

Posted 2013-06-03 11:55:58

Is there a vaccine to prevent Dengue Fever?

If so, is it available at clinics & hospitals?

Nope, best treatment is to cover up and avoid being bitten, particularly at dawn and dusk when the mozzies are feeding, long sleeve shirts and long cotton pants are helpful as is deet spray and similar..



#14 Psych01

Psych01

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 427 posts

Posted 2013-06-03 11:59:25

@eggers, there are currently no vaccinations for any of the 4 strains. There are clinical trials being done, here is an article from the US and also Global Vaccines site.



#15 RedQualia

RedQualia

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 280 posts

Posted 2013-06-03 12:07:20

Is there a vaccine to prevent Dengue Fever?

If so, is it available at clinics & hospitals?

Nope, best treatment is to cover up and avoid being bitten, particularly at dawn and dusk when the mozzies are feeding, long sleeve shirts and long cotton pants are helpful as is deet spray and similar..

 

Not completely correct. While the mosquitoes that bite at dusk/dawn may or may not carry dengue, the "Asian tiger" mosquitoes that bite in the mid-afternoon and 3AM-ish are known vectors for dengue. The tiger mosquitoes are the big striped ones. (See here: http://www.mosquitom...-tiger-mosquito -- moderator, remove the link if necessary, but the info is correct.)


Edited by RedQualia, 2013-06-03 12:07:57.


#16 loong

loong

    Floppy Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,951 posts

Posted 2013-06-03 12:15:40

Is there a vaccine to prevent Dengue Fever?

If so, is it available at clinics & hospitals?

Nope, best treatment is to cover up and avoid being bitten, particularly at dawn and dusk when the mozzies are feeding, long sleeve shirts and long cotton pants are helpful as is deet spray and similar..

Mozzies that carry this disease feed during the day



#17 chiang mai

chiang mai

    Thai Apologist and Basher

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15,721 posts

Posted 2013-06-03 12:18:06

 

Is there a vaccine to prevent Dengue Fever?

If so, is it available at clinics & hospitals?

Nope, best treatment is to cover up and avoid being bitten, particularly at dawn and dusk when the mozzies are feeding, long sleeve shirts and long cotton pants are helpful as is deet spray and similar..

 

Not completely correct. While the mosquitoes that bite at dusk/dawn may or may not carry dengue, the "Asian tiger" mosquitoes that bite in the mid-afternoon and 3AM-ish are known vectors for dengue. The tiger mosquitoes are the big striped ones. (See here: http://www.mosquitom...-tiger-mosquito -- moderator, remove the link if necessary, but the info is correct.)

I think you meant to say that my statement is incomplete as opposed to incorrect. That being the case will you please provide a link from a reliable source confirming that the higher risk periods are as you describe (mid-afternoon and 3am), I ask this because I have never heard of such in my ten years here? In fact all my information points at Dengue being transmitted by day time mozzies only and never at night (which is reserved for the Malaria carrying kind).



#18 lungmi

lungmi

    homo sapiens sapiens

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,589 posts

Posted 2013-06-03 12:23:03

In my area (Northwest) they let  drop water in the water containers (toilet, bathroom) and put lemongrass leaves. Outside they cover the containers.

We have good health stations specialised for malaria, rabies, snake bites and other rural  problems.

After diagnosis they sent you to the good doctors and cliniques for treatment.



#19 Morakot

Morakot

    Your Fellow Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,474 posts

Posted 2013-06-03 12:25:34



#20 WyattEarp

WyattEarp

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 199 posts

Posted 2013-06-03 12:26:26

I have a friend who is a bit of a hypochondriac and has a fever several times a week but never goes to the doctor,

 
Normally a hypochondriac is someone who goes to the doctor without fever, so wouldn't that make him the opposite?
 

A themometer is invaluble here, anything over 101 and you have a fever, at 102 you need to get to a hospital.

101 must be American numbers. It's 37C in the rest of the world.

#21 Emdog

Emdog

    Senior Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 918 posts

Posted 2013-06-03 12:34:52

"nice for the govt to indicate what areas are getting the bites" I usually get it on arm or leg.... Good government is worried about it. How about doing something? Oops! I have had the fever two times in last five years. No picnic. No cure for it, just keep fluids up and drink electrolytes. Lasts about 8 days. Or die. As you can tell, I am not dead yet...

#22 schondie

schondie

    Senior Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 692 posts

Posted 2013-06-03 12:52:32

Here in the south, I contracted dengue a couple of years ago. Also a friend staying with me got it a few weeks earlier.

 

When I ask local people if they've ever contracted it or if it's common to the area they say they've never heard of anyone with it.

 

It leads me to believe that it may be misdiagnosed at the hospitals or clinics as it must be more common than that.



#23 Bellweather

Bellweather

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 463 posts

Posted 2013-06-03 12:53:36

I have a friend who is a bit of a hypochondriac and has a fever several times a week but never goes to the doctor,

 
Normally a hypochondriac is someone who goes to the doctor without fever, so wouldn't that make him the opposite?
 

>A themometer is invaluble here, anything over 101 and you have a fever, at 102 you need to get to a hospital.

101 must be American numbers. It's 37C in the rest of the world.

 

A hypochondriac is someone who worries about their health even when not ill and they can do that without going to the doctor every time they feel bad .



#24 orang37

orang37

    Chimeric Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,056 posts

Posted 2013-06-03 13:01:04

Dengue is primarily carried by the female Anopheles Aedes Aegypti. It's the fastest growing arbovirus (arthopod borne virus) on the planet.

 

There is an incubation period following the bite of a Dengeue-carrying mosquito during which most people will be asymptomatic.

 

When the virus "blooms," the typical experience, like mine several years ago, is to feel suddenly "deathly" ill, and weak, and to have high-fever.

 

There are four strains of Dengue, and, while there is some debate about whether cross-immunization can occur, the majority opinion is that having one strain does not mean you can't get another.

 

There is no "treatment" for Dengue in the "curative" sense of that word: treatment is palliative, and symptomatic.

 

The great danger is that your red blood platelet count will go so low that your blood becomes so thin that it can perfuse into your lungs, or eyes. This very dangerous, potentially fatal, possible stage of Dengue is referred to as "hemorrhagic dengue fever." If a person has this stage of Dengue, they may require blood transfusions in order to survive. Or, your blood-pressure may fall to such a low-level that you will experience possibly fatal "Dengue shock syndrome."

 

The good news is that if Dengue hasn't killed you by about the seventh day after symptoms appear, you will, likely, survive.

 

I did not have to go into the hospital, but some people will need to be hospitalized, even if they are not in the hemorrhagic state.

 

The important thing is to get your red-blood platelet count monitored as frequently as you doctors advise.

 

And, Dengue can be more fatal to young children, and elderly, people, as well as those with weakened immune systems, cancer survivors, etc.

 

It took me about six-weeks to fully recover from Dengue. I had IV re-hydration, out-patient, during the high-fever period, twice.

 

The old British Colonial name for Dengue was "breakbone fever;" I did not have joint-pain symptoms specifically, for which I am thankful.

 

Here's to your health, and I'm hoping you never experience Dengue !

 

If you, or any family member, do suddenly go into a weak, and feverish, state, I hope you go to a good doctor immediately !

 

~o:37;



#25 recycler

recycler

    Senior Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 693 posts

Posted 2013-06-03 13:04:16

Is there a vaccine to prevent Dengue Fever?

If so, is it available at clinics & hospitals?

Nope, best treatment is to cover up and avoid being bitten, particularly at dawn and dusk when the mozzies are feeding, long sleeve shirts and long cotton pants are helpful as is deet spray and similar..

Actually the Dengue mosquito's are more active during the day, see below from an Aussie site:

Adult mosquitoes

            
 

Adult dengue mosquitoes like to rest in dark areas
both inside homes and underneath houses and other buildings. They prefer
to bite people during day light hours, unlike other types of mosquitoes
that are more active at night.


Some of their favourite resting spots include under beds, tables and
other furniture, behind curtains or anywhere dark and shaded under
houses.


Using a surface spray in these dark areas can help get rid of dengue mosquitoes around your home.

 

http://www.health.ql...fo/mosquito.asp







Sponsored by ...

Quick Navigation  View New Content Site search: