Jump to content




View New Content Help  
Photo
* * * * * 1 votes

Best retirement visa procedure coming from Los Angeles.


63 replies to this topic

#1 NCC1701A

NCC1701A

    Senior Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 573 posts

Posted 2013-06-26 20:02:55

Hello everybody,

I am going to be retiring to Thailand in January 2014. I was wondering, what is the best way to proceed getting my retirement visa? I live in Los Angeles, California. Should I go to the Thai consolidate in Los Angeles and get whatever paper work I need and get my visa before I leave? How many days before I leave should I go to the consolidate? 60? 30?

 

Or do I just hop on the plane and enter the country as a tourist and then go to whatever government office and start the process?

 

I understand about the money in the bank and other requirements.

 

I was wondering if anyone has done this and what happens at the immigration desk at the airport. I have been in many times as a tourist on a short stay. But what happens when you get off the plane and say "I am not leaving". Even if you have paper work from the Thai consolidate in Los Angeles, do they deal with you differently? Are you questioned or delayed somehow? Or do they just say make sure you go here and do this stuff by this date?

 

What happens if I book a one way ticket?

 

Anyway, I was just thinking that going to the Thai consolidate in Los Angeles would be the best to get everything lined up as possible.

 

 

Thanks for any input. And thanks for such a great forum.

 

 

 



#2 Jingthing

Jingthing

    Member Schmember

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 53,149 posts

Posted 2013-06-26 20:07:37

If you arrive at the airport without a ticket leaving Thailand within 30 days (to anywhere) and no visa, you will not even be boarded in L.A.

The problem isn't on entering Thailand, don't worry about that, they don't check travel plans.

Your have different options for visas.

LA offers the O-A visa so you might want to see if that option suits you. 

Because of that, most likely LA will NOT offer you a single entry O based on retirement, which many people use.

For that you could try Portland.

You might want to say WHERE you will be living in Thailand.

Many Thailand immigration offices offer an option of changing a 30 day stamp or tourist visa to an O visa as the first step before an annual retirement extension, but not all offices. 

You could board in LA without a visa but you'd need a ticket out somewhere within 30 days.

Also with the O-A if using banked money to qualify, the money shown would be in the USA. For retirement extensions in Thailand, banked money must be in Thailand and properly SEASONED. 

So you should say how you plan to qualify FINANCIALLY: bank account / income / or combination.

That could help with selecting the best method for you. 


Edited by Jingthing, 2013-06-26 20:14:50.


#3 NCC1701A

NCC1701A

    Senior Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 573 posts

Posted 2013-06-26 21:40:46

If you arrive at the airport without a ticket leaving Thailand within 30 days (to anywhere) and no visa, you will not even be boarded in L.A.

 

OK understand that.

 

The problem isn't on entering Thailand, don't worry about that, they don't check travel plans.

 

OK

 

Your have different options for visas.

LA offers the O-A visa so you might want to see if that option suits you. 

 

Well I thought the only visa option I have is a retirement visa. I will be doing the O-A retirement visa. This is based on info I just read on the Thai embassy.

 

http://dc.thaiembdc....SA/Non-Img.aspx

 

 

Because of that, Sorry, Because of what? most likely LA will NOT offer you a single entry O based on retirement, which many people use.

For that you could try Portland.

 

I am now seeing that I can apply via the mail with forms from the Thai embassy in Washington D.C. from their web site. They just want a form filled out, two photos, your passport and a bank statement. Maybe this is easier than going in person. They are also asking for the name and address of a reference person in Thailand. What if I don't know anyone in Thailand?

 

 

You might want to say WHERE you will be living in Thailand.

 

Chiang Mai. That brings up a question, does the Thai government require you to keep a permanent address or mailing address? What if I change my mind and live somewhere else in Thailand? I am really thinking about moving around the first year.      

 

Many Thailand immigration offices offer an option of changing a 30 day stamp or tourist visa to an O visa as the first step before an annual retirement extension, but not all offices. 


You could board in LA without a visa but you'd need a ticket out somewhere within 30 days.

 

OK

 

Also with the O-A if using banked money to qualify, the money shown would be in the USA. For retirement extensions in Thailand, banked money must be in Thailand and properly SEASONED. 

 

By seasoned you mean in the country for two months before the NEXT renewal one year later?

 

And that means I don't have to transfer the money to a Thai bank until two months before the NEXT renewal one year later?

 

So you should say how you plan to qualify FINANCIALLY: bank account / income / or combination.

OK

That could help with selecting the best method for you. Thanks

Thank you for your input. I have another question. Lets say I am now in Thailand living on my O-A Visa. Do they issue me some sort of ID card, maybe something that looks like a drivers license? Do I have to carry my passport with me everywhere I go in Thailand? And can I leave Thailand as many times as I want? To get back in to Thailand, I guess obviously I have my passport and a copy of my A-O visa and that is all I need to get back in? Sorry for all the lame questions.  


Edited by NCC1701A, 2013-06-26 21:43:41.


#4 lopburi3

lopburi3

    Star Member

  • Honorary Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 51,670 posts

Posted 2013-06-26 21:44:34

No there is no ID card and yes you are required to have passport available at all times (have in same city so someone can obtain if arrested is normal criteria).   Yes on a multi entry O-A visa you can travel and obtain a new one year stay on each entry made during the one year visa is valid.



#5 Jingthing

Jingthing

    Member Schmember

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 53,149 posts

Posted 2013-06-26 22:20:43

If you want an O-A, why not use LA? It's local to you. There would be no logical reason to use D.C. for an O-A.

If you go for an O-A, MAKE SURE you apply for a MULTIPLE ENTRY O-A. That's much better, can be used to stretch your stay for about two years before a need for extension. 

For O-A if using banked money, show money in the USA, not Thailand. 

(You can also use income.)

 

If you want to use another route, NOT O-A, LA or DC will not help you with a single entry O  based on the retirement reason. That's because they offer O-As so they only do O-As for retirees.

For that I would suggest Portland. They like other consulates do NOT offer O-As. 

With a single entry O, you'd apply for a retirement extension in Chiang Mai, if using the Thailand bank method, that's two months needed the first time, three months all later times. 

 

But you don't even need a single entry O or an O-A!

 

You could get a tourist visa from LA or enter or a 30 day stamp (but you need a ticket out of Thailand within 30 days for that to board the plane) and apply for a CHANGE OF VISA status at Chiang Mai to a single O (90 day stay), with the second step being the retirement extension. If using the bank method doing that, you must show that your money will be seasoned for two months by the time of your application for retirement extension. Again, you can also use INCOME or a combo of income and Thai bank, in which case no money seasoning is needed. They won't do the change of visa status unless you can show you will be qualified for the later retirement extension, they are linked. 

 

You seem to think O-A is your only starting option. You might think that from reading the websites in LA and DC. But that is NOT true. It is very common to start without ever getting an O-A. I never had one and again it is common not to use one. The O-A requires some extra stuff, medical and police report, that are not required for retirement extensions in Thailand. 

 

You need to show proof of address for retirement extensions AND 90 day address reports. Policies vary based on offices on specific enforcement details. 


Edited by Jingthing, 2013-06-26 22:27:22.


#6 craigt3365

craigt3365

    Modified Member

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 13,167 posts

Posted 2013-06-27 08:39:17

I went through this process in October for my mother, using the LA Thai consulate.  We got the "O-A" Long Stay Retirement Visa. $200.  Not sure if it is multi-entry or not as we didn't really care.  The price is fixed at $200 for the "retirement" visa.

 

It was a very easy process, though a bit of paperwork is required.  Processing time took about 4 week if I remember correctly.  You can visit them in person if you have the time, and don't like sending your passport visa the mail.  We were in Vegas, so didn't have that option. 

 

*****  Maybe somebody else can help me here.  I believe it is valid for 90 days.  So don't cut it too close with regards to getting this done.  *******

 

Make sure you have everything required and you'll have no problems.

 

My recommendation would be to get the retirement visa before you leave the US.  It's a relatively painless process.  When you get here you can either open a savings account with 800,000 Baht or get an income verification letter from the US embassy for your yearly renewal.  The income verification letter is easy to get and they don't ask for any verification of your income, but it costs $55 and can be a hassle to get.  I think Chiang Mai has a US consulate, but I'm not sure.  Here in Pattaya, they do outreach visits 4 times a year and the verification letters are good for a few months...though this has been in a bit of flux lately.

 

Regarding the address, if you need help with that, let me know and you can use my address.  No worries!

 

I know you'll probably have a ton of other questions as you go through this process.  Thaivisa.com is a great place to go for help.  But first, do some searches to see if your questions have been answered before.  If not, try to post in the appropriate forum.  For example, if you have specific questions on housing in Chiang Mai, use the CM sub forum.  For questions regarding banking, use the banking sub forum.

 

Other than that, best of luck!

 

P.S. Here's the proper website for the Thai LA consulate: http://www.thaiconsu....org/index.aspx

 

There's another one out there that is not official.

 

Here's the fees for the visas: http://www.thaiconsu...aspx?link_id=24



#7 lopburi3

lopburi3

    Star Member

  • Honorary Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 51,670 posts

Posted 2013-06-27 08:53:44

The only type O-A visa available in USA is multi entry - they had too many people get zapped with the single entry type (making an exit and finding out they can not return).  $200 is the 5,000 baht multi entry fee.

 

From my understanding bank deposit can be in US or Thailand for O-A visa applications.

 

The visa is valid for one year as is any multi entry non immigrant visa - you have up to that one year to enter (but remember it is not valid for new entry after expiration date).

 

Chiang Mai has has had a US Consulate for many decades.



#8 stoli

stoli

    Super Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,235 posts

Posted 2013-06-27 09:57:24

Welcome to Thailand. It is really easy to get an O-A Retirement Visa from the Thai Embassy in Los Angeles. I sent it in from Northern California with all of the documentation requested, (easy to find this on their website). I had it all back in 10 days. They could turn it around in one day, but they work on the ones that need to go out right now because of the persons flight schedule. They state on their website that by walking into the Thai Embassy it can be done on the same day.

 

You really don't want your visa until you are ready to come to Thailand. You will realize what I mean by that is you will find that if you say, arrive 1-1-2014, and your Visa is stamped "enter on or before 12-28-2014, if you use your multiple entry and leave the country and return before 12-28-2014, upon re-entry you will be granted a one year extension of stay, good until say 12-26-2015 if you came back in on 12-27-2014. This is how your turn a first year Visa into a two year Visa.

 

The main thing to remember is that all of this is very easy through the L.A. Thai Embassy. They could not be more accommodating to me. Just make sure your O-A Visa has multiple entries, as you will want to explore.

 

Once you are here, it is generally easy going through immigration for your 90 day check-ins. All you have to do to is follow their rules, and not fight their rules. They get to make the laws. Just have your paperwork done as requested and you will be fine. Report to immigration on time, and you will be fine. If you need help with doing the 90 day paperwork, there are business's set up outside every immigration office that will do it for you for practically nothing. Stock up on passport photo's, you will need them every time you visit.

 

Good luck. You will enjoy Thailand if you want to.



#9 jcb2001

jcb2001

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 484 posts

Posted 2013-06-27 10:44:03



There is a office on Larchmont street across for the LA Thai Consulate that helped me with my O visa. You can PM me for their name and phone number. My wife and I used their services because we were totally lost on how and what type of visa I needed. It cost, but it was well worth it for us.

Also, there is the requirement to check in with your local Thai Immigration office every 90 days, so it is pretty important to have a permanent address if you go for the O visa from LA. Sounds like a tourist visa might be you best bet until you can decide where you want to live. Good luck and have a great retirement.

#10 Jingthing

Jingthing

    Member Schmember

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 53,149 posts

Posted 2013-06-27 10:49:03

I think it's worth mentioning the O-A visa option is not for everyone retiring in Thailand, and it is not required, and starting with one does not put people starting on it into any special higher status group (over people who started with an O visa and an extension) once in the retirement extension system in Thailand.

 

For example for some Americans getting the medical report needed for the O-A (but not extensions) is an expensive matter as some doctors have been  reported to demand all implied clinical tests actually be carried out before they will sign the form (ca-ching).

Not to mention the police record report which is required for the O-A but not extensions.

No it shouldn't be hard or expensive to get such a police report (however to put this gingerly for those with an actual record ... well ... ) ...

 

Did the OP mention whether he qualifies by INCOME alone? Because in that case, he wouldn't even need a Thai bank account, much less a two month seasoned 800K in Thailand to go for his first extension in Thailand WITHOUT the hassle of the O-A visa application in LA.

 

So there are choices, and one option does not best fit all.

 

In general I try not to nudge anyone into the O-A option or the no O-A option as I think there is no "best" option for everyone. The wisest tactic in my view is learning the pros and cons of the O-A option vs. the non O-A option and see which path fits best with the situation of the retiring INDIVIDUAL. 


Edited by Jingthing, 2013-06-27 11:00:32.


#11 Jingthing

Jingthing

    Member Schmember

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 53,149 posts

Posted 2013-06-27 10:49:26

There is a office on Larchmont street across for the LA Thai Consulate that helped me with my O visa. You can PM me for their name and phone number. My wife and I used their services because we were totally lost on how and what type of visa I needed. It cost, but it was well worth it for us.

Also, there is the requirement to check in with your local Thai Immigration office every 90 days, so it is pretty important to have a permanent address if you go for the O visa from LA. Sounds like a tourist visa might be you best bet until you can decide where you want to live. Good luck and have a great retirement.

I assume you mean an O-A visa. 



#12 stoli

stoli

    Super Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,235 posts

Posted 2013-06-27 11:00:12

There is a office on Larchmont street across for the LA Thai Consulate that helped me with my O visa. You can PM me for their name and phone number. My wife and I used their services because we were totally lost on how and what type of visa I needed. It cost, but it was well worth it for us.

Also, there is the requirement to check in with your local Thai Immigration office every 90 days, so it is pretty important to have a permanent address if you go for the O visa from LA. Sounds like a tourist visa might be you best bet until you can decide where you want to live. Good luck and have a great retirement.

If you plan on retiring here, do not come on a Tourist Visa. You would have to go back to your home country to get a retirement Visa because you can not apply for it here. Just get your Retirement Visa for $200, which includes multiple entries. Really, the paperwork is extremely easy to fill out. I always use the business's around the immigration offices here to fill out my paperwork, (costs just a few dollars every 90 days), but for the O-A Visa from the Thai Embassy in L.A., it could not be easier. They notify you when they receive your package with a name in L.A. When I called, that guy always answered. And yes, he was a very nice American married to a Thai woman. Just complete the paperwork as they ask. Give them any address you want to. Give them your name with your hotel address underneath it. When you find a permanent address, go right away to immigration and report your new address to them. They understand that people move. They just want to know where you moved to. Easy. Simple. Again, just follow their rules.



#13 Jingthing

Jingthing

    Member Schmember

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 53,149 posts

Posted 2013-06-27 11:03:15

Again, you do not NEED any "retirement visa" (commonly called an O-A) to retire in Thailand. 

This I can say with 100 percent confidence. 

It is NEVER required. It is only an option for starting.

You can start with a 30 day stamp or tourist visa and do a CHANGE OF VISA status in Chiang Mai as part of a two step process, with the second step being the annual retirement extension.

Many people also start with a SINGLE entry O visa obtained at a "friendly" consulate in their home country or commonly in the region, Malaysia and Laos. Then they later start with a retirement extension done at their local Thai immigration office.

To suggest someone would need to travel back to the USA to retire in Thailand is simply incorrect information ... sorry. 

If you want to choose the O-A option, which is only one choice, not required to retire here, then that is true, only available in the home country.


Edited by Jingthing, 2013-06-27 11:06:19.


#14 stoli

stoli

    Super Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,235 posts

Posted 2013-06-27 11:07:52

I think it's worth mentioning the O-A visa option is not for everyone retiring in Thailand, and it is not required, and starting with one does not put people starting on it into any special higher status group (over people who started with an O visa and an extension) once in the retirement extension system in Thailand.

 

For example for some Americans getting the medical report needed for the O-A (but not extensions) is an expensive matter as some doctors have been  reported to demand all implied clinical tests actually be carried out before they will sign the form (ca-ching).

Not to mention the police record report which is required for the O-A but not extensions.

No it shouldn't be hard or expensive to get such a police report (however to put this gingerly for those with an actual record ... well ... ) ...

 

Did the OP mention whether he qualifies by INCOME alone? Because in that case, he wouldn't even need a Thai bank account, much less a two month seasoned 800K in Thailand to go for his first extension in Thailand WITHOUT the hassle of the O-A visa application in LA.

 

So there are choices, and one option does not best fit all.

 

In general I try not to nudge anyone into the O-A option or the no O-A option as I think there is no "best" option for everyone. The wisest tactic in my view is learning the pros and cons of the O-A option vs. the non O-A option and see which path fits best with the situation of the retiring INDIVIDUAL. 

I had been seen previously by a Doctor in Bangkok. With one email to him, he filled out the medical form and emailed it back to me, no charge. Accepted without any problem.

 

 

My local Sheriff's Dept. filled out the Police Report, and charged me $10 for it. Applied one day, picked it up the next day.



#15 Jingthing

Jingthing

    Member Schmember

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 53,149 posts

Posted 2013-06-27 11:10:42

 had been seen previously by a Doctor in Bangkok. With one email to him, he filled out the medical form and emailed it back to me, no charge. Accepted without any problem.

 

 

My local Sheriff's Dept. filled out the Police Report, and charged me $10 for it. Applied one day, picked it up the next day.

 

That's good info. I thought you needed a USA doctor for O-A visa applications in the U.S. However, the OP may not have a relationship like that with a Thai doctor or U.S. doctor. There have been reports of this over the years of some Americans being forced to shell out big bucks to get that medical form sorted. I agree the police report should not be a big deal unless you have a police record in which case obviously ...



#16 Jingthing

Jingthing

    Member Schmember

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 53,149 posts

Posted 2013-06-27 11:11:45

The only type O-A visa available in USA is multi entry - they had too many people get zapped with the single entry type (making an exit and finding out they can not return).  $200 is the 5,000 baht multi entry fee.

...

That is great info and news to me that O-A visas in the U.S. are now multiple entry by default. 


Edited by Jingthing, 2013-06-27 11:12:35.


#17 keeniau96

keeniau96

    Super Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,009 posts

Posted 2013-06-27 11:25:15

By now you may be thoroughly confused by what is really a simple process. Applying for retirement visa in LA or DC will require medical and police certificates, which are a major pain and expense. Just get the multiple entry tourist visa from Portland honorary counsel (very amenable, quick and simple). Come to Thailand, check out Chiang Mai then go to the Thai Immigration office there to apply for retirement extension there. There is only the age and 800k baht (or US$ equivalent) money requirement but you seem OK on that. Relax, it's really simple if you just follow the Immigration rules, with the caveat that different Immigration offices eg. CM, Phuket, Bangkok etc. may have slight differences in specifics. So if you are favoring CM just follow their requirements as explained by the lads there.



#18 lopburi3

lopburi3

    Star Member

  • Honorary Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 51,670 posts

Posted 2013-06-27 11:28:27

They have been multi entry only for several years now - there is no option for single entry anymore on US applications.

Washington:

Visa Processing Fees:-
      $200.- (multiple entries)>
Visa processing fees are payable in money order or cashier check made payable to “The Royal Thai Embassy”. 

 

LA:

Non-Immigrant Visas :
- Single Entry - No single-entry Non-Immigrant O-A Visas US$80.00
- 1 Year Multiple-Entry (each entry 90 days)
- Non-Immigrant "O-A" Long-Stay Retirement Visa (one year stay) US$200.00

 

Chicago still lists single entry on website but quite sure they can not issue.



#19 ubonjoe

ubonjoe

    Star Member

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 22,504 posts

Posted 2013-06-27 11:30:17

He could get a single entry O visa in Portland or any honorary consulate for being over the age of 50 for retirement. 

With an O visa entry he would just apply for extension of stay within the last 30 days of his 90 day entry.



#20 Jingthing

Jingthing

    Member Schmember

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 53,149 posts

Posted 2013-06-27 11:43:34

He could get a single entry O visa in Portland or any honorary consulate for being over the age of 50 for retirement. 

With an O visa entry he would just apply for extension of stay within the last 30 days of his 90 day entry.

I agree if using Portland the best tactic would be a single entry O visa and not any kind of tourist visa.

While he could start with a tourist visa and do a conversion to O at Chiang Mai, if all he wants is a tourist visa, LA would do fine for that, just don't mention the word retirement to them.

 

I have noticed over the years a tendency for some people to become quite biased for either starting with an O-A or starting without one. This might sometimes be related to the way they did it personally. Personally I started with a single entry O from a consulate and then came to Thailand to start with retirement extensions. No complaints but I certainly also well understand the pros and cons of starting with an O-A. I chose not probably mainly because I was in driving distance of a consulate that offered single Os but not O-As but also the medical form expense and hassle was a big negative factor to me for the O-A (didn't have a local doctor).

 

As the OP is close to LA which offers O-As (but not single Os related to retirement reasons) that might be a strong persuasive factor for him to choose starting with an O-A. 

 

No doubt the O-A has some very strong pros:

 

Can make it last about two years before needing to apply for retirement extension in Thailand while starting with a single O you need to start working on your first extension quickly

 

If using banked money, can show money in the home country to qualify, while for retirement extensions in Thailand the money needs to be in Thailand (but for people using income, this pro doesn't matter)


Edited by Jingthing, 2013-06-27 12:01:57.


#21 craigt3365

craigt3365

    Modified Member

  • Global Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 13,167 posts

Posted 2013-06-27 12:06:06

By now you may be thoroughly confused by what is really a simple process. Applying for retirement visa in LA or DC will require medical and police certificates, which are a major pain and expense. Just get the multiple entry tourist visa from Portland honorary counsel (very amenable, quick and simple). Come to Thailand, check out Chiang Mai then go to the Thai Immigration office there to apply for retirement extension there. There is only the age and 800k baht (or US$ equivalent) money requirement but you seem OK on that. Relax, it's really simple if you just follow the Immigration rules, with the caveat that different Immigration offices eg. CM, Phuket, Bangkok etc. may have slight differences in specifics. So if you are favoring CM just follow their requirements as explained by the lads there.

The police certificate took us 10 minutes and didn't cost a penny.  The medical part was, luckily, covered by her health insurance.  But it was a breeze.  Easy peasy.



#22 NCC1701A

NCC1701A

    Senior Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 573 posts

Posted 2013-06-27 13:36:02

Wow Thank you everybody for all your different takes on the visa options.

I did not know I had to do the police report. I have no problem with that but something to consider. The medical is not a problem but just time consuming

I am about 20 mins from the consulate in LA so I may try to jump through hoops here in the US before I go over. But I am glad I see there are different options. There is a good feeling knowing you have the visa in your hand before you get all the way to Chiang Mai. And not having to transfer cash till a year later is nice too. And I am glad about the multi reentry part as I will be going to neighboring countries.

So am I to understand that no police report or medical will be asked for in Thailand?

I am going to post my progress here in detail for anyone else who might need the Info.

#23 Jingthing

Jingthing

    Member Schmember

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 53,149 posts

Posted 2013-06-27 13:39:18


So am I to understand that no police report or medical will be asked for in Thailand?

 

Correctomundo.

Good luck with your O-A visa application in LA and your retirement in Thailand.

One tip: contact your US banks before leaving and find out their policies for doing SWIFT transfers overseas.

Quite often you need to sign some forms in a branch in the US to set up this process for later.

Also in Thailand, you might consider using BANGKOK BANK. That's because with them you can do ACH transfers as if domestic from most U.S. banks online. Other Thai banks do not offer that and you'd be stuck with SWIFT transfers.



#24 lopburi3

lopburi3

    Star Member

  • Honorary Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 51,670 posts

Posted 2013-06-27 13:41:15

Correct no medical or police report for extensions of stay in Thailand.  You will not have to have money in account for about 19 months from O-A issue if you use for longest stay (making a new entry just before it expires).  Also remember you can use 65k month income letter or a combination to meet the 800k figure for extensions each year.



#25 Sophon

Sophon

    Super Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,460 posts

Posted 2013-06-27 14:50:12

Correct no medical or police report for extensions of stay in Thailand.  You will not have to have money in account for about 19 months from O-A issue if you use for longest stay (making a new entry just before it expires).  Also remember you can use 65k month income letter or a combination to meet the 800k figure for extensions each year.

 

19 months, how do you arrive at that figure?

 

Sophon







Sponsored by...

Quick Navigation  View New Content Site search: