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Pronouncing "papaya"


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#1 wym

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Posted 2014-02-05 23:56:39

Mahlahgaw

I hear it pronounced with a glottal stop at the very end.

Does that happen even when there is no instance of the Thai letter explicitly indicating a stop?

Or is it just very short?



#2 Deserted

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Posted 2014-02-06 00:07:05

Never heard the glottal myself, just a short vowel. just my opinion.



#3 Thaddeus

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Posted 2014-02-06 00:14:35

Pa Pa Ya

 

 

All short vowels, maybe aspirate the last one.

 

 

Round here anyway.

 

 



#4 Mojomor

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Posted 2014-02-06 00:16:59

Pa Pa Ya

 

 

All short vowels, maybe aspirate the last one.

 

 

Round here anyway.

 

 

 

Agreed + 1

 



#5 Deserted

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Posted 2014-02-06 00:18:45

Pa Pa Ya

 

 

All short vowels, maybe aspirate the last one.

 

 

Round here anyway.

 

 

 

I think the OP is referring to the Thai word for papaya, malagaw though.



#6 Thaddeus

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Posted 2014-02-06 00:52:32

*
POPULAR

 

Pa Pa Ya

 

 

All short vowels, maybe aspirate the last one.

 

 

Round here anyway.

 

 

 

I think the OP is referring to the Thai word for papaya, malagaw though.

 

 

 

The topic title is "Pronouncing papaya"

 

 

Malagaw is a city in Spain where wanabe posh people go for holidays ;)



#7 KarenBravo

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Posted 2014-02-06 00:55:37

 

 

Pa Pa Ya

 

 

All short vowels, maybe aspirate the last one.

 

 

Round here anyway.

 

 

 

I think the OP is referring to the Thai word for papaya, malagaw though.

 

 

 

The topic title is "Pronouncing papaya"

 

 

Malagaw is a city in Spain where wanabe posh people go for holidays wink.png

 

 

Yes, but, what is the sub-forum title?



#8 Deserted

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Posted 2014-02-06 02:13:00

 

 

Pa Pa Ya

 

 

All short vowels, maybe aspirate the last one.

 

 

Round here anyway.

 

 

 

I think the OP is referring to the Thai word for papaya, malagaw though.

 

 

 

The topic title is "Pronouncing papaya"

 

 

Malagaw is a city in Spain where wanabe posh people go for holidays wink.png

 

 

Papaya is malagaw in Thai  http://thai-language.com/id/134728

 

If you read the original post properly you will see it begins with that word.



#9 wym

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Posted 2014-02-06 03:29:34

Some being clever some not so much, afraid I can't tell the difference. Maybe someone could answer my question?

Does the Thai word มะละกอ have a glottal stop at the end of its pronunciation?

 

I have no idea about the written aspect and that's a secondary question if anyone wants to address that.

 

Thanks in advance.



#10 Seastallion

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Posted 2014-02-06 05:26:52

Some being clever some not so much, afraid I can't tell the difference. Maybe someone could answer my question?

Does the Thai word มะละกอ have a glottal stop at the end of its pronunciation?

 

I have no idea about the written aspect and that's a secondary question if anyone wants to address that.

 

Thanks in advance.

If you look at the spelling, มะละกอ, you will see it is not a glottal stop, though easy to mistake it as such because that final "vowel" is a short vowel.



#11 AyG

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Posted 2014-02-06 06:59:30

Some being clever some not so much, afraid I can't tell the difference. Maybe someone could answer my question?

Does the Thai word มะละกอ have a glottal stop at the end of its pronunciation?
 
I have no idea about the written aspect and that's a secondary question if anyone wants to address that.
 
Thanks in advance.

If you look at the spelling, มะละกอ, you will see it is not a glottal stop, though easy to mistake it as such because that final "vowel" is a short vowel.


The final vowel is actually long (but yes, no glottal stop). (If it were short a short vowel then there would be a glottal stop.)

#12 wym

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Posted 2014-02-06 07:24:56

OK, maybe I was mis-hearing it short at the end.

 



#13 Neeranam

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Posted 2014-02-06 07:45:21

I've heard this word pronounced differently in different areas. It seems to range from "ma la gaw" to "ma la gor". This is not a glottal stop. Glottal stops occur when there is a short vowel ending, not followed by any consonant.For example in the word 'island' เกาะ.

Edited by Neeranam, 2014-02-06 07:46:47.


#14 AyG

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Posted 2014-02-06 08:05:12

Glottal stops occur when there is a short vowel ending, not followed by any consonant.For example in the word 'island' เกาะ.


That is unclear or incorrect (not sure which).

 

For all syllables ending in a written short vowel there is a terminal glottal stop. So, for example, in มะละกอ there are two glottal stops - after ma and after la.



#15 Richard W

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Posted 2014-02-06 08:34:44

For all syllables ending in a written short vowel there is a terminal glottal stop. So, for example, in มะละกอ there are two glottal stops - after ma and after la.

That's true for a careful pronunciation, but word internally these syllable-final glottal stops are usually dropped in normal speech. In the case of มะละกอ, the first seems to be more likely to be preserved. This isn't surprising given that the มะ in the names of fruit is a shortening of หมาก.



#16 Deserted

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Posted 2014-02-06 13:56:30

 

For all syllables ending in a written short vowel there is a terminal glottal stop. So, for example, in มะละกอ there are two glottal stops - after ma and after la.

That's true for a careful pronunciation, but word internally these syllable-final glottal stops are usually dropped in normal speech. In the case of มะละกอ, the first seems to be more likely to be preserved. This isn't surprising given that the มะ in the names of fruit is a shortening of หมาก.

 

 

Inclined to agree that its dropped usually.



#17 Thaddeus

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Posted 2014-02-06 14:04:54

Some being clever some not so much, 

 

 

Sorry, it was my misunderstanding, I saw the word 'Mahlahgaw' and it honestly didn't register as I have never heard any of the locals here use it.

 

Is this a regional thing?



#18 Tywais

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Posted 2014-02-06 14:09:37

Use Google Translate and hit the speaker icon to hear it pronounced.  มะละกอ sound



#19 Neeranam

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Posted 2014-02-06 17:57:42

Use Google Translate and hit the speaker icon to hear it pronounced.  มะละกอ sound


The 'malagaw' sounds right but the 'papaya' is wrong, IMHO.

#20 Tywais

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Posted 2014-02-06 19:51:35

 

Use Google Translate and hit the speaker icon to hear it pronounced.  มะละกอ sound


The 'malagaw' sounds right but the 'papaya' is wrong, IMHO.

 

I assume that is a Thai pronunciation of it.  Actually doesn't sound that far off from how I would say it but without the inflection (tone).



#21 kriswillems

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Posted 2014-02-06 20:47:10

The glottal stop(s) in the first or first 2 syllables are dropped, and the first 2 syllables are closer to mid than to high tone because the last syllable is stressed.

But pronouncing it like it's written would be ok too.


Edited by kriswillems, 2014-02-06 21:01:06.


#22 Seastallion

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Posted 2014-02-07 16:15:30

 

 

Some being clever some not so much, afraid I can't tell the difference. Maybe someone could answer my question?

Does the Thai word มะละกอ have a glottal stop at the end of its pronunciation?
 
I have no idea about the written aspect and that's a secondary question if anyone wants to address that.
 
Thanks in advance.

If you look at the spelling, มะละกอ, you will see it is not a glottal stop, though easy to mistake it as such because that final "vowel" is a short vowel.

 


The final vowel is actually long (but yes, no glottal stop). (If it were short a short vowel then there would be a glottal stop.)

 

Thank you. Or ang is in my ears short. I have had no formal learning so happy to learn.......however, the GF explains that because it is part of a final syllable and is proceeded by gor gai, it makes it long.



#23 kriswillems

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Posted 2014-02-07 17:34:31

อ can have 5 functions:

- the function of a long vowel like in พอ, มะละกอ

- the function of a silent first consonant like in อัน, เอา, อื่น, อก

- it can be part of another vowel like in เธอ

- the short version of  the long อ vowel, if used with - ็อ like in ล็อค

- it can be used to convert a low class consonant to middle class (in only a few words), like in อยู่

 

The short version of the อ-vowel in an open syllable is เ-าะ like in หัวเราะ

or in a closed syllable:  -็อ like in ล็อค 


Edited by kriswillems, 2014-02-07 17:57:02.


#24 AyG

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Posted 2014-02-07 17:41:17

อ can have 3 functions:
- the function of a long vowel like in พอ, มะละกอ
- the function of a silent first consonant like in อัน, เอา, อื่น
- it can be part of another vowel like in เธอ
 
The short version of the อ-vowel in an open syllable is เ-าะ like in หัวเราะ
or in a closed syllable:  -็อ like in ล็อค


Or it can modify the class of the following consonant (though this only applies for four words): อย่า อยู่ อย่าง อยาก.



#25 kriswillems

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Posted 2014-02-07 17:43:35

 

อ can have 3 functions:
- the function of a long vowel like in พอ, มะละกอ
- the function of a silent first consonant like in อัน, เอา, อื่น
- it can be part of another vowel like in เธอ
 
The short version of the อ-vowel in an open syllable is เ-าะ like in หัวเราะ
or in a closed syllable:  -็อ like in ล็อค


Or it can modify the class of the following consonant (though this only applies for four words): อย่า อยู่ อย่าง อยาก.

 

Right, that was my last edit, but you were faster :)







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