merlin2002

Uber patrons in Chiang Mai

320 posts in this topic

7 minutes ago, bubba said:

 

I do agree with you about that. But in this case, I am wondering whether Uber drivers make anything at all. Think about it - there is a lot of cost involved operating a car, including cost, depreciation (Uber require a late-model car), petrol, insurance, taxes, and maintenance. One driver I spoke with told me that she most often earned about 80 baht per hour, without any airport trips (150 baht flat rate). Sometimes it is zero or 20 baht, with no calls coming in. Subtract all the costs and what is left for the driver? Certainly not a decent living at near minimum wage. Housekeeping jobs at hotels probably pay much better.

 

I really like Uber as well and not just because it is so cheap; however, considering this, I have taken to at least giving the drivers a modicum of a tip. Unless Uber give them a better fare or better share of the fare, I can't imagine how long it will last, with drivers signing up, finding that they cannot earn any money and then leaving, then perhaps some new drivers coming in to have a go at it. There is a limited pool available for this. 

 

Thank you!!! - It is so nice to finally hear a comment on this forum discussing how little some drivers make and the fact that they have expenses and even families to feed. I am so tired of reading about how people got "ripped off" for 10 baht and such. I have found if you have some respect for the drivers, they are mostly very nice people, just doing what is usually a thankless job. 

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Used uberx for the first time last night. Less than half what I have paid the "metered taxi mafia" in the past. Needless to say, I gave a decent tip. Everyone's a winner... apart from the mafia.

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ID: 78   Posted (edited)

I was pleased to find Uber in CM and have used it a half dozen times this week, including quite late at night. Rarely more than a 5-6 minute wait, although at 2am it took closer to 25-- still less than the hassle of finding a tuk tuk to take me to my home and less expensive even with the unsolicited tips I give.  I may simply have been lucky or helped by good ratings. (Customers are rated just as drivers are and that information is available to the driver when a request is made).

 

None of the drivers I've had in CM (or elsewhere) to this point have been full-time, which very likely makes a difference. If the economics or novelty don't work it will disappear, of course.

 

Tonight will be an interesting test. 

 

 

Edited by justmaybe
punctuation
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last time at maya want back around chang puak  at 7 pm  a tuk tuk come and ask   where u go , he say 150 i say  No lol 120 no 100 no  he ask  me how much  i say uber ride me there for 50 b can  you ? and he gone without say anything hahahah  finish mafia  taxi 

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Thought for sure the TAXI union would sort this out...

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Used it for the first time in CM tonight, two trips.  Excellent service both times at a very good price. 

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Many believe globalization//massive income inequaltiy//mcdonalds not noodles//99% of wealth in hands of 1% and worldwide internet coverage is grand and thank goodness Uber is a part of that. Yeah, i've criticized here for not going uber, not going facecrap, not going airbb, not going down the lane with my eyes glued to a 3 inch screen but i hear the birds sing,  see the beauty of the sunrise in person, and have felt the warm evening breeze in the seat of the tuk-tuk.

 

I've got bags of money but would prefer to share with local folks not mr uber nor his ilk.  Many here think saving a penny or two, sitting in air/con all the time, getting a cheap ride on the back of a poor person within minutes, buying the chinese smartphone, using credit cards to buy a 20 baht item, posting photos of daily meals on facecrap all make for a modern person and those not conforming are luddite jerkballs.  

 

I pity you. 

 

 

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Used Uber a few times now in CM. Such a relief to finally have a decent taxi service here. Will be using exclusively from now on.

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have used uber a few times now and its great never had to wait more than 6 minutes for a ride in san sai noi the price to town was 77 baht

 

rick

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If people think the UBER fare is too low (and from reports here I would agree it is), then some of those using UBER should start a FB group that demands to give the drivers a fair compensation. The power of social networks usually helps....

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Aye, good luck with that crusade...

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On 12/31/2016 at 11:42 AM, thai006 said:

last time at maya want back around chang puak  at 7 pm […] i say uber ride me there for 50 b can  you ?

 

On 12/31/2016 at 10:56 PM, siam2007 said:

So now the Mafia guys get what they deserve - genuine market power poison, but a remedy for the consumer

 

Something about these comments just rub me the wrong way.

 

Thailand has a serious problem when it comes to educating their citizens, so we have people who are without proper education, especially the ethnic minorities (of which there are many in Chiang Mai) which lack the rights of full-fledged citizens, so these people have rather limited options when it comes to jobs.

 

There is also little to no retirement and health care system for these people, so many have to care for their immediate and possibly also extended family.

 

That we can make these people drive us around for 50 baht is only because they have no other options. It has nothing to do with the power of the free market and it’s ability to have competition minimize profit, but everything to do with having a class of people who are effectively slaves for the rest of us.

 

These people (who drive us around for 50 baht) are basically excluded from buying stuff at the same stores as us, eat at that the same restaurants, stay at the same hotels, etc.

 

And yet we have foreigners hassling over an already ridiculously low price, equating their attempt of getting proper pay for the job they perform with how mafiosos work, etc.

 

It makes me ashamed to be a foreigner in Thailand, because these cheap charlies damage the reputation of all of us. Sadly, I have heard Thais say “farang kee-niaw” far too many times, and following this forum, it’s hard not to agree.

 

At the same time we have foreigners think they are a gift to Thailand and the Thai economy, maybe not the same group, but it wouldn’t surprise me if it was. Probably also the same group who do not understand why young attractive Thai women do not hang around their favorite bar, which is only their favorite because they have the cheapest beers.

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On 12/5/2016 at 7:47 AM, millwall_fan said:

Don't ask them how much it is or they'll assume you want a private hire. Tell the driver where you want to go, if he nods get in and give him 20B when you get out. 

 

This.  Don't mention money.  If you are a little nervous about doing it, have a 20 baht note in your hand.  As you lean into the window to tell the driver where you're going, lean your hand with the note on the window.  If they tell you 40 baht, 50 baht, smile and say sow baht.  Sow is CM dialect for 20.  By using sow rather than yee sip (formal Thai for 20) the driver will know that you're not a tourist and you know the what the price should be.  Some drivers won't take you, just wave them away and flag down the next one. Rinse and repeat.  My record is 7 drivers saying no before I got one (some just weren't going in my direction, some wanted more money), but it didn't take much more than 5 minutes for the 8th one to take me.  Don't waste your time trying to haggle with them.  Once you say 'Sow baht' and they say no, wave them on and wait for the next.  But it really is better to not mention money.

 

Also, never approach a stationary truck, always stand somewhere where the drivers can pull over without causing traffic havoc and flag one down.

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Something about these comments just rub me the wrong

 ....

That we can make these people drive us around for 50 baht is only because they have no other options. It has nothing to do with the power of the free market and it’s ability to have competition minimize profit, but everything to do with having a class of people who are effectively slaves for the rest of us.

.....


You do not know what real slavery is nor do you know about sea creatures but are correct about need for education as you aptly demonstrate.

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40 minutes ago, Konini said:

 

This.  Don't mention money.  If you are a little nervous about doing it, have a 20 baht note in your hand.  As you lean into the window to tell the driver where you're going, lean your hand with the note on the window.  If they tell you 40 baht, 50 baht, smile and say sow baht.  Sow is CM dialect for 20.  By using sow rather than yee sip (formal Thai for 20) the driver will know that you're not a tourist and you know the what the price should be.  Some drivers won't take you, just wave them away and flag down the next one. Rinse and repeat.  My record is 7 drivers saying no before I got one (some just weren't going in my direction, some wanted more money), but it didn't take much more than 5 minutes for the 8th one to take me.  Don't waste your time trying to haggle with them.  Once you say 'Sow baht' and they say no, wave them on and wait for the next.  But it really is better to not mention money.

 

Also, never approach a stationary truck, always stand somewhere where the drivers can pull over without causing traffic havoc and flag one down.

 

 

I honestly do not believe that learning the northern Thai word for "twenty" is going to convince a tuk tuk or songthaew driver to give you a competitive, local rate. 

 

But what you have described here is the complicated and often expensive procedure for getting sub-par personal transport in Chiang Mai. Spending time waving off seven drivers to save 20 baht before you get underway to where you want to go?  Little wonder that Uber is doing so well now. As you said "don't waste time trying to haggle with them".

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ID: 93   Posted (edited)

1 hour ago, Diplomatico said:

Methinks you know little or nothing about Uber or the people who drive for Uber.  

 

My response was to people talking about tuk-tuk and taxi drivers.

 

1 hour ago, Bill97 said:

You do not know what real slavery is nor do you know about sea creatures but are correct about need for education as you aptly demonstrate.

 

This could be true, but insults are not arguments, so you are not refuting anything I wrote.

 

As for not knowing what real slavery is, of course I do, and there are instances of people being treated as property in the Thai fishing industry, which is really no different than how slavery worked in the west, but my use of the word here was meant to describe the modern day analogue.

 

Edited by lkn

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I have never had a problem with Songtaus and their charges.  Tuk tuks on the other hand can be a problem.  Wanted 300Bht fro Riverside to Tapae Gate. Uber would be a good option.

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As a passenger Uber is a boon for me here in BKK.  The drivers are middle class people who own their car, unlike taxi drivers, are fully identified, and so more likely to be responsible.  Also, I am more likely to enjoy a conversation with them.  The ones I have asked seem enthusiastic about Uber.  But I don't think it is as good a deal for the drivers as they believe.  All those I have spoken with fail to consider the return on the substantial investment in the car itself, apart from oil and gas costs.  Of course, none of them bought the car in order to become an Uber driver; they had the car already.  But they ignore depreciation, which is very real, if abstract. 

 

In New York City the Uber drivers attempted to organize themselves to resist fare reductions.  In the long run organizing a union is the only way for them to get a fair share of the revenue.  Don't know if that will happen in Thailand though.

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ID: 96   Posted (edited)

1 minute ago, CaptHaddock said:

Of course, none of them bought the car in order to become an Uber driver; they had the car already.  But they ignore depreciation, which is very real, if abstract.

Does the car depreciate faster if it's used as an Uber vehicle?

Edited by SaintLouisBlues

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Just now, SaintLouisBlues said:

Does the car depreciate faster if it's used as an Uber vehicle?

 

Sure does.  It's called wear and tear.

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1 minute ago, CaptHaddock said:

Sure does.  It's called wear and tear.

Do you have any data on the incremental depreciation of driving a vehicle for Uber vs. driving that same vehicle for purely personal reasons?

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3 minutes ago, SaintLouisBlues said:

Does the car depreciate faster if it's used as an Uber vehicle?

 

 

Of course it does...more KMs depreciate the car and then there are all the maintenance costs that will occur more frequently. 

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Just now, SaintLouisBlues said:

Do you have any data on the incremental depreciation of driving a vehicle for Uber vs. driving that same vehicle for purely personal reasons?

 

Well, let's compare:

 

A car driven only to and from work and some shopping trips clocking up 2000 km/month

 

A car driven every day, right hours a day for Uber, clocking up, say 15,000 km/month 

 

Which one do you think will be worth less at the end of the year and which one do you think you would spend more for maintenance costs, cleaning, etc.?

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