r136dg

Sink Plumbing-within the wall ?

24 posts in this topic

There's 1 1/2" pvc pipes coming up through the concrete floor. Somehow they have to do a 90* out the wall for the smaller sink drain pipe in a very minimal space.. Problem I'm having is I can't find what would seem like the proper plumbing for making that turn in the wall & reducing. The only solution I found was as in the pic (from house we're renting). Using a 1 1/2 to 1"  , and using a short piece of  metric electrical conduit (grey pipe). The sink drain pipe is actually a perfect fit into the 1" T with the grey pipe inbetween. Since it's not under pressure it should be fine. Than I would cap the top of the T in the wall.

Seems kind of half a$$ and was wondering if anyone knows a more professional way of doing this?

Also, is there a standard cement & tile height in the bathrooms here? I ask for setting the height of that drain pipe. I don't want to reach down to my sinks like most of the bathrooms I see here.

Thanks!

pipe.jpg

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Just wanted to clarify the 2nd question :

Off the sub concrete bathroom floor, how thick do they ussually cement for the tiles. That's the height I'm looking for. 

Thanks 

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2 hours ago, r136dg said:

There's 1 1/2" pvc pipes coming up through the concrete floor. Somehow they have to do a 90* out the wall for the smaller sink drain pipe in a very minimal space.. Problem I'm having is I can't find what would seem like the proper plumbing for making that turn in the wall & reducing.

 

I'm a bit confused as to what you are doing.  Are you talking about plumbing a new build in progress?


If you find a larger plumbing supply house (TOA or similar) they'll usually carry tight 90° elbow reducers, though usually only in 1", 3/4" and 1/2" size options.  Another option is to use a reducer before it hits the 90.

 

As to your second question, the final tile height depends on desired water drain slop. I've seen tile layers add just enough to stick the tiles to the concrete floor, or sloping on 2" - 3" to create their drain slop if its a wet shower floor. 

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Yep, new construction. Haven't been to a TOA but exhausted everything in Lamphun including Global of course.

Thanks

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10 hours ago, r136dg said:

Seems kind of half a$$ and was wondering if anyone knows a more professional way of doing this?

 

I know "half a$$":  smile.gif 

 

IMG_20170117_184344.jpg

 

I also know a slightly more professional way:  wink.gif

 

IMG_20170117_180250.jpg

 

The only trouble with these "glued-in" pipes is when you have to repair them, and there's no room for manoeuvring them before the glue sets. This one outside the back of the house came out of the wall and straight down into the concrete. When it started leaking, the solution chosen was:

 

IMG_20170117_182619.jpg   laugh.gif

 

 

 

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22 minutes ago, JetsetBkk said:

I know "half a$$":  smile.gif 

 

IMG_20170117_184344.jpg

 

[...]

 

:)  At least you have a working U-bend (or P-trap) in this one! 

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48 minutes ago, JetsetBkk said:

 

I know "half a$$":  smile.gif 

 

IMG_20170117_184344.jpg

 

I also know a slightly more professional way:  wink.gif

 

IMG_20170117_180250.jpg

 

The only trouble with these "glued-in" pipes is when you have to repair them, and there's no room for manoeuvring them before the glue sets. This one outside the back of the house came out of the wall and straight down into the concrete. When it started leaking, the solution chosen was:

 

IMG_20170117_182619.jpg   laugh.gif

 

 

 

 

Can't believe anyone would still be using the glued PVC junk. If you are doing a new build do yourself a favour and fit heat welded PPR pipe. Plenty of stainless unions and threaded fittings available so you can remove filters or sink traps when needed. The pipe is UV stable and the joins will never leak. It only costs a few baht more for peace of mind.

 

IMG_4006.PNG

 

 

 

 

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48 minutes ago, Pdaz said:

 

Can't believe anyone would still be using the glued PVC junk. If you are doing a new build do yourself a favour and fit heat welded PPR pipe. Plenty of stainless unions and threaded fittings available so you can remove filters or sink traps when needed. The pipe is UV stable and the joins will never leak. It only costs a few baht more for peace of mind.

 

IMG_4006.PNG

 

 

 

 

 

All the pipework in my house is maintained by my landlord's worker. I don't think they know any other way! I've lived in 6 different houses in Phuket and they all had the "glued PVC junk" - I didn't realise there was anything else!  I've not seen the green pipes in your post in any of the places I've lived in.

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ID: 9   Posted (edited)

1 hour ago, RichCor said:

 

:)  At least you have a working U-bend (or P-trap) in this one! 

 

Indeed  smile.gif . After accidentally dropping an important metal object down the sink, I had to use a magnet to drag it from the lower horizontal pipe until it was under a vertical pipe, and then lower the magnet down the pipe to pick it up. For the sake of a few baht and a U-bend it would be so much easier to retrieve stuff.

 

IMG_20170117_180250 2 .jpg

 

In fact, I did consider getting a U-trap inserted into the bit of pipe that goes into the wall, but I don't think there's enough "wiggle room" to do it.

 

 

 

Edited by JetsetBkk
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2 hours ago, JetsetBkk said:

 

All the pipework in my house is maintained by my landlord's worker. I don't think they know any other way! I've lived in 6 different houses in Phuket and they all had the "glued PVC junk" - I didn't realise there was anything else!  I've not seen the green pipes in your post in any of the places I've lived in.

 

It's pretty common now. Even available in home pro and Thai wasadu. But you are right the blue PVC is what Thais are used to and it is still used in most projects. They only see the initial cost saving. Not concerned about longevity.

 

IMG_4008.JPG

 

IMG_4009.JPG

 

 

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They started with the blue so I'll run with it, maybe try that green pipe in the kitchen, in the name of science.

Regarding my original question, I'm still in doubt. I know my with a piece of grey will work & I'll probably run with it. Stopped by some new construction last night; they had the 1 1/2" pipe 90* ed out of the tile. But how that significantly smaller sink piping fits securely in that's a mystery. I'm tempted to pull the piece going into the wall in the house we're renting (in the pic). But that thin metallic pipe will break for sure & how much hassle could be ahead of me fixing that.

As I was writing I decided to pull the white pvc trap & have a look (pics posted). The metallic pipe appears to go into the 1 1/2" and I think it's cemented/glued there. Very secure & I don't want to break & replace it.

I like my T idea better. It will make for easier fixes if pipes need replacement. Still don't seem the right way of doing this though.

20170118_073421_resized.jpg

pipe.jpg

20170118_073308_resized.jpg

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Many places sell the sink drain-line / bell-trap you have pictured in your initial post.

 

The up-country Thai installation method I've commonly seen is to push the smaller diameter pipe into the larger diameter drain line and fill the gap space with mortar so the gray water doesn't drain back. Not a method for Hi-So homes.

 

Also, as sink drain line/trap systems are easily plugged or fouled over time, they need to be opened and all the gunk cleaned out manually (especially if you use those awful bell traps). Foreign matter tends to stick and grow on the sink drain-cover down screw or block the small openings in the bell design traps, slowing the water drain from the sink bowl, so you'll usually want something that can be taken apart or later replaced entirely if necessary. This means going with screw-on unions and unglued reducing bushings where one pipe fits into another  ...similar to how the chrome/white drain at your rental house is done.

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17 hours ago, RichCor said:

 

The up-country Thai installation method I've commonly seen is to push the smaller diameter pipe into the larger diameter drain line and fill the gap space with mortar so the gray water doesn't drain back. Not a method for Hi-So homes.

I think your're dead on RichCor. Replacing that pipe down the road (which is inevitable by seeing the condition of the one in our rental @ 12 years old) would be a fiasco.  With what I did in our bathrooms, I can use the bell traps, pipes will be tight, not requiring any glue & easy to replace if needed. Wouldn't pass any plumbing inspections in the States but it'll be fine.

Thanks!

Bathroom sinks.jpg

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I would like to add something, if anyone's still looking at this;

I have little plumbing experience (obviously) & have an after thought. Do any of you do pressure tests on your water feed lines? I was considering this before they get to stuccoing. 

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I do.  A friend's builder didn't and ended up tearing out a bathroom wall and re-building 3 times.

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Definitely confirms I'm doing it! 

Thanks

 

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Normally I would automatically say a pressure test really isn't needed, but...

 

just recently saw a local builder glue up a 3/4" water line, globing on the solvent, pushing the mess together, then piling on more solvent to the outside, then pressurizing the line at 100% after 3 minutes.  Noticed the next day that the coupling had sprung a couple of pin-hole leaks where he'd piled on the extra solvent.  So, yeah, INSPECT and TEST EVERYTHING!

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Water line couple joint mentioned in my previous post.

It's a slow, slow leak. Probably should have made this into an animated .gif so you can see the water bubbling out under the dried solvent.  Luckily this is an outside line so the water isn't creating any lasting damage.

So, yea, check the work.

 

ThaiVisa_WaterLine_extrasolventplease.jp

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ID: 19   Posted (edited)

On Friday, January 20, 2017 at 10:43 AM, r136dg said:

I would like to add something, if anyone's still looking at this;

I have little plumbing experience (obviously) & have an after thought. Do any of you do pressure tests on your water feed lines? I was considering this before they get to stuccoing. 

 

Why not just run the water and look for any leaks first 

 

Unless you can isolate your system and hook an air pressure gauge then it's about the only other way 

Edited by upside
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4 hours ago, upside said:

Unless you can isolate your system and hook an air pressure gauge then it's about the only other way 

 

???

You can purchase a Water Pressure Gage.  Read the static pressure.

 

...or do what my family does to me, let one of the faucets drip before going to bed and let me listen to the pump cycle all night. Guaranteed way to lull you to sleep.  :angry:

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23 hours ago, RichCor said:

 

???

You can purchase a Water Pressure Gage.  Read the static pressure.

 

...or do what my family does to me, let one of the faucets drip before going to bed and let me listen to the pump cycle all night. Guaranteed way to lull you to sleep.  :angry:

 

The line is isolated then filled with water 

 

Then pressurized air gets fed into the line and to see if there's a leak an air psi gauge is used . If there's a leak then the air gauge drops 

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On 1/17/2017 at 11:12 PM, Pdaz said:

 

It's pretty common now. Even available in home pro and Thai wasadu. But you are right the blue PVC is what Thais are used to and it is still used in most projects. They only see the initial cost saving. Not concerned about longevity.

 

IMG_4008.JPG

 

IMG_4009.JPG

 

 

Don't forget you need the machine to do it most places that sell the pipe and fittings, if i remember 1000 per week plus 10 000 deposit.

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35 minutes ago, sappersrest said:

Don't forget you need the machine to do it most places that sell the pipe and fittings, if i remember 1000 per week plus 10 000 deposit.

 

Can also buy the basic machine for about 1800 baht. I did as I have ongoing projects and have lent it to a few (farang) friends.

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On 1/23/2017 at 0:09 PM, Pdaz said:

 

Can also buy the basic machine for about 1800 baht. I did as I have ongoing projects and have lent it to a few (farang) friends.

Would you please let me know where to get machine for 1800 baht? Thanks  

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