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Jonathan Fairfield

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  1. Thailand Live Saturday 23 September 2017

    Police arrest 11 Africans in Bangkok for overstaying visas Image: Daily News Some 11 Africans were arrested on Saturday morning for overstaying their visa, as Special Operation and Patrol Police Division officers joined forces with tourist police and immigration police to search five Bangkok locations. Full story: https://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/1003826-police-arrest-11-africans-in-bangkok-for-overstaying-visas/
  2. Police arrest 11 Africans in Bangkok for overstaying visas Image: Daily News Some 11 Africans were arrested on Saturday morning for overstaying their visa, as Special Operation and Patrol Police Division officers joined forces with tourist police and immigration police to search five Bangkok locations. Operation Black Eagle drew on officers from three forces to check locations with a history of housing illegal immigrants, said Division Chief Pol Maj-General Surachet Hakpal. He said the operation netted 11 suspects from African nations. He did not give specific details of the suspects’ nationalities. Surachet said the operation was carried out after the prime minister ordered police to crack down on illegal immigrants suspected to be in Thailand to carry out various scams, including romance scams and ATM skimming. The suspects will be deported and face 10-year entry bans, Surachet said. Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/breakingnews/30327493 -- © Copyright The Nation 2017-09-23
  3. Thailand Live Saturday 23 September 2017

    Norwegian man’s arm pieced by iron grill A Norwegian man was injured when he slipped and an iron grill pierced through his arm at his house in Chon Buri on Friday night, police said. Full story: https://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/1003822-norwegian-man’s-arm-pieced-by-iron-grill/
  4. Norwegian man’s arm pierced by iron grill

  5. Norwegian man’s arm pierced by iron grill

    Norwegian man’s arm pieced by iron grill A Norwegian man was injured when he slipped and an iron grill pierced through his arm at his house in Chon Buri on Friday night, police said. Rescuers had to use an iron cutter to free the left arm of Tore Wiig, 68, from the iron grill in front of his house in Chon Buri’s Sattahib district. His Thai wife, Manthana Wiig, 44, said the accident happened at 9pm when rain caused the tile floor to be slippery. She said her husband was walking and slipped and fell towards the iron grill. Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/breakingnews/30327490 -- © Copyright The Nation 2017-09-23
  6. Thailand Live Saturday 23 September 2017

    BREAKING US pedophile fugitive and English teacher arrested in Koh Samui The American pedophile Jackson Hall, 24, has been arrested after he fled Bangkok to Koh Samui. Full story: https://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/1003767-us-pedophile-fugitive-and-english-teacher-arrested-in-koh-samui/
  7. Police seek info on alleged US paedophile working as teacher

    UPDATE US pedophile fugitive and English teacher arrested in Koh Samui Full story: https://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/1003767-us-pedophile-fugitive-and-english-teacher-arrested-in-koh-samui/
  8. US pedophile fugitive and English teacher arrested in Koh Samui Image: Thairath The American pedophile Jackson Hall, 24, has been arrested after he fled Bangkok to Koh Samui. Hall - wanted in the US on a string of charges and who had been hiding out in Thailand for nearly a year - was apprehended at the port of Nathorn last night at 8pm on the holiday island. A convicted felon Hall is wanted in Alabama for the rape of a 6 year old boy, other sexual molestation charges, giving false information to get a passport and identity theft. He is believed to have stolen the identity of a man called Tyler Doran Smith - he had entered Thailand last October 6th at Aranyaprathet, Sa Kaew province using that name. He is believed to have had English teaching jobs in both Khon Kaen and Rayong. Immigration chief Natthathorn Phrohsunthorn said that police in Bangkok had discovered that Hall was living with Nittaya Beetge - an agent who helps find English teachers - in the Phasi Charoen area of Bangkok. When police went there they missed Hall by a day and were told by Nittaya that he had fled to Samui. Contact was made with Samui immigration and Hall was arrested and is now being held on the island. Nittaya's estranged husband Darron Beetge now in South Africa with his six year old son told Thaivisa that he felt relieved and vindicated that the information that he had been able to supply in the case had proved to be correct. Thaivisa has followed the case in detail since a report was made earlier in the year that Nittaya's life may be in danger. According to Mr Beetge his ex and Hall have had a child together, their baby daughter born in August. Hall is believed to have worked as an English teacher in both Khon Kaen and Rayong, said police. Claims have been made that Nittaya aided and abetted Hall during his time in Thailand. Source: Thai Rath -- © Copyright Thai Visa News 2017-09-23
  9. Thailand Live Saturday 23 September 2017

    Russia tells North Korea, U.S. 'hot heads' to calm down UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - Russia's foreign minister said on Friday the leaders of North Korea and the United States should tone down their bellicose rhetoric and warned that a collapse of a nuclear deal between Iran and world powers would only embolden Pyongyang. Full story: https://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/1003765-russia-tells-north-korea-us-hot-heads-to-calm-down/
  10. Thailand Live Saturday 23 September 2017

    Despite undiplomatic discourse, Trump's dance card is full By Arshad Mohammed and Michelle Nichols UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - A subtle diplomat like Talleyrand, Donald Trump is not. Full story: https://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/1003764-despite-undiplomatic-discourse-trumps-dance-card-is-full/
  11. Thailand Live Saturday 23 September 2017

    UK's May sets out transition plan in bid to unlock Brexit talks By William James and Isla Binnie FLORENCE, Italy (Reuters) - Prime Minister Theresa May set out a plan on Friday to retain full access to the EU's single market for two years after Brexit to try to reassure business and reset the tone of stalled negotiations with Brussels. Full story: https://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/1003763-uks-may-sets-out-transition-plan-in-bid-to-unlock-brexit-talks/
  12. Thailand Live Saturday 23 September 2017

    U.S. challenged by rising North Korea tensions, Russia urges calm By Michelle Nichols and David Brunnstrom UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - Russia urged "hot heads" to calm down on Friday as the United States admitted it felt "challenged" by North Korea's warning that it could test a hydrogen bomb over the Pacific and President Donald Trump and Kim Jong Un traded more insults. Full story: https://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/1003762-us-challenged-by-rising-north-korea-tensions-russia-urges-calm/
  13. Russia tells North Korea, U.S. 'hot heads' to calm down UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - Russia's foreign minister said on Friday the leaders of North Korea and the United States should tone down their bellicose rhetoric and warned that a collapse of a nuclear deal between Iran and world powers would only embolden Pyongyang. "The exchange of threats is quite bad, unacceptable," Sergei Lavrov told reporters at a news conference." We have to calm down the hot heads," Lavrov said, adding that he was convinced a Russian-Chinese proposal could still pave the way for a diplomatic solution to the North Korea crisis. Lavrov added that a collapse of the Iran nuclear deal would give North Korea little incentive to drop its nuclear program in return for sanctions relief. (Reporting by Michelle Nichols; Writing by John Irish; Editing by Paul Simao) -- © Copyright Reuters 2017-09-23
  14. Despite undiplomatic discourse, Trump's dance card is full By Arshad Mohammed and Michelle Nichols UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - A subtle diplomat like Talleyrand, Donald Trump is not. The U.S. president, in his first foray at the U.N. General Assembly, derided North Korean leader Kim Jong Un as a "rocket man ... on a suicide mission" and delivered an unabashed defence of sovereignty at the seat of global multilateralism. But if his speech drew barbs from allies and authoritarian adversaries, it did nothing to deter his dance partners at the premier diplomatic waltz of the year, the 193-member United Nations' annual gathering of world leaders known by the acronym UNGA. Trump held bilateral meetings with 13 leaders this week, more than his predecessor Barack Obama had at his first UNGA(five), his last (six) or his busiest (10), according to data compiled by CBS News White House correspondent Mark Knoller. Trump's less than diplomatic speech on Tuesday recalled the fiery nationalist language of his Jan. 20 inaugural address and raised eyebrows across the political spectrum by its bald assertion of the primacy of U.S. interests. "Our government's first duty is to its people, to our citizens - to serve their needs, to ensure their safety, to preserve their rights, and to defend their values," he said, evoking his campaign's nationalist themes despite the departure of advocates such as Steve Bannon from the White House. Germany's foreign minister, Sigmar Gabriel, delivered a riposte in a scathing and barely veiled critique on Thursday. "National egoism, I believe, is worthless as a regulatory principle for our world," Gabriel said. "The motto 'our country first' not only leads to more national confrontations and less prosperity, in the end there can only be losers." Robert Mugabe, Zimbabwe's authoritarian 93-year-old leader who has ruled the former British colony since independence in 1980, also sought to nudge Trump in a more peaceable direction. "Mr. Trump, please blow your trumpet, blow your trumpet in a musical way towards the values of unity, peace, cooperation, togetherness, dialogue," he said. In his speech, Trump said if the United States were forced to defend itself or its allies, it would have "no choice but to totally destroy North Korea" and he called Iran's government a "murderous regime" that exports "violence, bloodshed and chaos." His directness contrasts with the subtlety of 18th- and 19th-century French diplomat Charles-Maurice de Talleyrand, who is reputed to have said: "A diplomat who says 'yes' means 'maybe,' a diplomat who says 'maybe' means 'no,' and a diplomat who says 'no' is no diplomat." Still, Trump's language has seeped into the discourse of other leaders, perhaps seeking to curry his favour. Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas spoke of "draining the swamp" of Israeli occupation while South Korean President Moon Jae-in called North Korean behaviour "extremely deplorable." Trump, possibly recalling the criticism that his Democratic U.S. presidential opponent Hillary Clinton earned for calling some of his supporters a "basket of deplorables," was pleased. "I'm very happy that you used the word 'deplorable'," Trump told Moon. "That's been a very lucky word for me and many millions of people." Both Moon and Abbas had sitdowns with Trump, and there was no shortage of others who wanted to meet him. A U.S. official said the White House accommodated as many requests for meetings as they could schedule, noting some leaders who wanted to meet Trump did not make the cut. The U.S. president has also wanted to see the leaders of China, India and Germany, but they did not come this year. Afghan President Ashraf Ghani met Trump on Thursday, and officials in Kabul said all the impetus had come from the Afghan side, with no burning interest from the White House. French President Emmanuel Macron made clear he would work with any U.S. president, whoever he was, and said he and Trump had clear disagreements on climate change and Iran policy. "I want a deep, cordial dialogue to bring him back into the international and multilateral fold on these two subjects," Macron told reporters. "As I'm a pragmatist, I put myself in a position to work the best way possible with him." Asked if dealing with Trump was like managing a difficult child, the French president replied: "Not at all. I'm managing a partner of the world's biggest power and a historical partner for our country." (Reporting by Yara Bayoumy, Anthony Boadle, David Brunnstrom, Rodrigo Campos, Parisa Hafezi, Steve Holland, John Irish, Jeff Mason, Arshad Mohammed and Michelle Nichols at the United Nations and James Mackenzie in Kabul; Writing by Arshad Mohammed; Editing by James Dalgleish) -- © Copyright Reuters 2017-09-23
  15. UK's May sets out transition plan in bid to unlock Brexit talks By William James and Isla Binnie FLORENCE, Italy (Reuters) - Prime Minister Theresa May set out a plan on Friday to retain full access to the EU's single market for two years after Brexit to try to reassure business and reset the tone of stalled negotiations with Brussels. But her proposals for such a transition, for meeting Britain's financial obligations and for protecting EU citizens' rights fell short of what the EU wanted. EU Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier praised the speech for its "constructive spirit" but asked for more detail. Another official said it had left him "even more concerned". In a speech at a 14th-century church in Florence, Italy, May appealed directly to EU leaders to unlock the talks, which have stalled over a series of issues, including the size of the bill Britain should pay as part of its divorce settlement. She spent much of her 30-minute speech describing the similarities between Britain and the EU, saying that if the complicated talks to unravel more than 40 years of union should fail, the only beneficiaries would be those who oppose democracy, liberalism and free trade. Sterling fell against both the dollar <GBP=> and the euro <EURGBP=> during May's speech, weakening by more than half a cent against the U.S. currency. Late on Friday ratings agency Moody's downgraded its assessment of Britain's creditworthiness, saying Brexit was damaging the country's medium-term growth prospects. The government said Moody's view was "outdated" and did not consider May's most recent comments. "Clearly people, businesses and public services should only have to plan for one set of changes in the relationship between the UK and the EU," May told an audience of Italian business leaders and diplomats. "So during the implementation period, access to one another's markets should continue on current terms, and Britain also should continue to take part in existing security measures." Britain wants to move the talks forward and start addressing how a future relationship with the EU would work, a move May's government says is vital if they want to find agreement on the divorce bill. But the EU has stood firm, refusing to discuss trading arrangements until "sufficient progress" is made on the first three issues - the financial settlement, the land border with EU member Ireland and the protection of expatriates' rights. CONCESSIONS Beyond her vision for a transition, involving around two years of trading on the same terms, but no payments for access to the EU single market, May pledged to protect EU citizens' rights in Britain after Brexit, saying that decisions by the European Court of Justice would be taken into account by British courts. On the financial settlement, she also said Britain would "honour commitments we have made during the period of our membership". "I do not want our partners to fear that they will need to pay more or receive less over the remainder of the current budget plan as a result of our decision to leave," she said. May has long said Britain will honour its financial obligations, but she did not mention the 20 billion euro figure reported in local media in the days running up to the speech. She said little on Ireland, beyond noting that no one wanted a return to a "hard border" with British-ruled Northern Ireland that could reignite tensions on the island. Barnier said her words showed "a willingness to move forward, as time is of the essence", but that they needed to be "translated into a precise negotiating position of the UK government". But the head of the European Parliament's biggest group, the centre-right European People's Party, Manfred Weber, said May's speech had brought no more clarity. "I am even more concerned now," he added. British opposition lawmakers were not impressed, with the Labour Party saying the government was "no clearer about what our long-term relationship with the EU will look like." Trade union leader Frances O'Grady said the prime minister was pretending that "we can have our cake and eat it," while a business lobby, the British Chambers of Commerce, underlined its desire to "get trade talks moving". It was never going to be an easy speech, with May struggling to appeal simultaneously to the EU, to business and to the supporters of Brexit in her own party who want to hold her to her pledge of a clean break with the bloc. "It's clear that we're out," one senior Conservative source said, adding that he was pleased to hear May agree that no deal was better than a bad deal. ACRIMONY The speech comes at the start of a crucial week for Europe. On Sunday, German voters are expected to return conservative Chancellor Angela Merkel to power but also vault eurosceptic parties into parliament, including the Alternative for Germany (AfD), whose nationalist, anti-immigrant ideas echo those of Britain's UKIP party, a driving force behind Brexit. Two days later, French President Emmanuel Macron is expected to flesh out his ideas for a "relaunch" of the EU and euro zone, underscoring the bloc's determination to press ahead with a closer union that excludes the UK. Britain and the EU do agree on one thing: The clock is ticking, with Barnier saying there is only a year left to find an agreement to give Britain a controlled exit. May's ill-fated decision to have an election in June not only used up time but also sapped her authority and gave a stronger hand to pro-Brexit lawmakers who want a total break with the bloc and to reduce any divorce bill to zero. May's top team of ministers put on a show of unity in Florence - with foreign minister Boris Johnson, one of Britain's most prominent hardline Brexit politicians and a one-time leadership contender, sitting in the front row. "I think what was so uplifting about this speech was it was positive; it was confident about what Britain can do but also about our relations with the rest of the EU," Johnson said. (Additional reporting by Elisabeth O'Leary, Kate Holton, Elizabeth Piper, David Milliken and Kylie MacLellan in London, and Noah Barkin in Berlin; Editing by Kevin Liffey and Cynthia Osterman) -- © Copyright Reuters 2017-09-23
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