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BANGKOK 11 December 2018 22:29

IMHO

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About IMHO

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  1. What you can see form his plans is that the 6.8M span requires 25x25cm posts (standard is 20x20), and the beams are using 8x25mm rebar which costs around 7x more than standard 12mm rebar, and at 70x25 more than double the concrete than a standard 40x20 beam. Hard to put a number on it without understanding the full BOQ and plan, but I'd guess the end result would be an increase in per sqm costs of around 2-3x.
  2. The 7M wide spans are the issue with your design - because of them, no 'standard' building costs apply, because the footings, posts and beams will all need to be substantially larger than normal.
  3. PPR is welded together - I can't see how it would be any less durable than brazed copper?
  4. As noted by other posters - any AC installer has what you need, but be warned it's very expensive. Why copper? if for hot water plumbing, you could also look at using PPR pipes (green pipes).
  5. There's plenty of rally racing in TH, but it's all pickups... Sorry not really my thing, I have just noticed the races on TV a thousand times... I can't help much more than to say "keep on looking"
  6. The only thing special about PPV's (pickup based passenger vehicles) is the low excise tax they attract - which helps make them better value for money in Thailand - less than 25% the price of any brand SUV you just listed
  7. IMHO

    The Future Of Electric Cars?

    ^I answered before I read your post IMHO but seems we are of the same mind. I think the problem is as much about infrastructure and more rapid charging stations at least initially as anything and clearly the governments of the world need to take the lead on this and then the private finance will come forward. The answer is in some sort of electric magnetic charging strip wireless transfer system technology on the road surface in specific lanes to allow for recharging while still driving.. I'd venture a guess that if just few billion of the current military budgets world wide were sequestered and put towards the development of such a system with the balance of that budget going to the first government and or private contractor that developed a successful system there would plenty of offerings in short order.. The charge-as-you-go systems are technically viable, but would take a very long time to implement, and don't become widely useful until the task is largely completed. Also, think about countries where a pothole goes un-serviced for years - no way are they ready/able to maintain infrastructure like this To me, the most workable solution is one where you don't own the batteries at all, nor do you charge them. Instead of popping into a gas station for more gasoline, you instead pop-in for a quick battery swap. This would be a much easier and faster proposition from a deploy perspective, suits existing business models with only modest investment, would allow recharging of batteries off-peak to ease strain on the grid, and also would make the initial vehicle cost lower as you're not buying lithium and other rare materials, only borrowing it. At the same time it also solves the big resale problems existing EV's are going to have... If already implemented, would also mean that all those people that bought Fisker's wouldn't been soon to be out in the cold with an unmaintainable car Better Place tried to do this on their own, but failed in US and Australia. It needs government legislation to work properly (i.e. force all EV manufacturers to adopt standard battery form factors and also support it with incentives), but at least Better Place have proven the system & business model works in smaller scales for them (Denmark and Israel). Edit: It would also mean that existign EV's could take advantage of new battery technologies as they become available too... Think about how far standard AAA/AA/C/D batteries have come, and how beautifully backwards compat they turned out to be I agree in the shorter term your solution is definitely the way go but as well as was mentioned it's going to have to begin with governments getting involved first with proper regulations and the like. I wouldn't worry too much about the countries with poor roads as it's baby steps first as always, many of those countries didn't even have many cars up until recently either and if the rest of the world were to update and apply the technology it would still relieve billions of gallons of fossil fuels being used per day in those more advanced countries so the world as a whole would still benefit greatly in managing the loss of that fuel better and lowering exhaust emissions while they make an effort to catch up. Agree, it's a great scenario, but think about Thailand implementing infrastructure like this - you may as well propose the govt makes all roads out of titanium By the time the govt here agreed to take on infrastructure like this, Mr Fusion will probably be a reality and it can then just slot into your old world-standard vehicle battery slot
  8. IMHO

    The Future Of Electric Cars?

    Most hydrogen fuel cell research projects have been abandoned in the US, but there's still a few active ones in EU and JP... It's still a great fuel for generating electricity on the fly, and would mean battery-less electric cars if/when they make a commercially viable system..
  9. IMHO

    The Thai Highway Code

    If you want to see truly crazy driving go to Taiwan, if you want to see proper traffic go to India or the Philippines, if you want to be accosted by crazy drivers go to LA, or if you want to drive alongside zoned out zombies go to Australia. If I haven't yet covered you, name your country and I'll find a way to insult your driving too
  10. IMHO

    Importing A Car

    Correct... But he was asking about "easier" rather than cheaper Although if by a new car and concerned about the ease of import... The easiest way is to by from the dealer in Thailand Well, the import certificate isn't all that hard either way - compared to the hardships that start once it lands here ....
  11. IMHO

    The Future Of Electric Cars?

    ^I answered before I read your post IMHO but seems we are of the same mind. I think the problem is as much about infrastructure and more rapid charging stations at least initially as anything and clearly the governments of the world need to take the lead on this and then the private finance will come forward. The answer is in some sort of electric magnetic charging strip wireless transfer system technology on the road surface in specific lanes to allow for recharging while still driving.. I'd venture a guess that if just few billion of the current military budgets world wide were sequestered and put towards the development of such a system with the balance of that budget going to the first government and or private contractor that developed a successful system there would plenty of offerings in short order.. The charge-as-you-go systems are technically viable, but would take a very long time to implement, and don't become widely useful until the task is largely completed. Also, think about countries where a pothole goes un-serviced for years - no way are they ready/able to maintain infrastructure like this To me, the most workable solution is one where you don't own the batteries at all, nor do you charge them. Instead of popping into a gas station for more gasoline, you instead pop-in for a quick battery swap. This would be a much easier and faster proposition from a deploy perspective, suits existing business models with only modest investment, would allow recharging of batteries off-peak to ease strain on the grid, and also would make the initial vehicle cost lower as you're not buying lithium and other rare materials, only borrowing it. At the same time it also solves the big resale problems existing EV's are going to have... If already implemented, would also mean that all those people that bought Fisker's wouldn't been soon to be out in the cold with an unmaintainable car Better Place tried to do this on their own, but failed in US and Australia. It needs government legislation to work properly (i.e. force all EV manufacturers to adopt standard battery form factors and also support it with incentives), but at least Better Place have proven the system & business model works in smaller scales for them (Denmark and Israel). Edit: It would also mean that existign EV's could take advantage of new battery technologies as they become available too... Think about how far standard AAA/AA/C/D batteries have come, and how beautifully backwards compat they turned out to be
  12. MTM still had the Audi A1 in their prices lists as late as Jan 2013 - not sure on the current status though: A1 2.0L 7AT T FSI - 2,190,000 A1 2.0L 7AT T FSI SE - 2,290,000 The Focus STi story you read was an April Fool's joke - not going to happen, but sources do say an ecoboost version is still on the cards for TH, they just don't say when.. If/when we get that, it could have some tuning potential. The Volvo V40 can be expect to depreciate just like all other Volvos - it will take a decade or more for them to gain reputation in the used market, but that decade doesn't start until they start putting in the effort..
  13. IMHO

    Importing A Car

    Only easier to get an import permit for it - no easier on your pocket.
  14. IMHO

    The Future Of Electric Cars?

    The problem with pure EV's in their current form is that they simply can't just "gas and go" - cars are bought for convenience, not inconvenience IMHO, the future is going to be in: * Battery swap stations - this would require all/most manufacturers to settle on a common form factor for batteries, and someone to be able to make a business plan around owning/recycling battery packs, distribution chain management, and supporting franchisees. I can't see this happening without forced legislation though (maybe CA can help? 555) * Range Extenders - we already have flex-fuel generators like the Ampere/Volt, whether it continues this way or takes on the form for fuel cells or some other energy efficient method the generate electricity is yet to be known, but this system does still have the ability to reduce/eliminate dependance of foreign oil, even if it doesn't necessarily mean as big environmental gains. * Classic Hybrids - these continue to be the best overall stop-gap in the medium term and we'll be seeing ever increasing options come to market. by 2015 it's anticipated that at least 50% of all new models will have a hybrid option in their line-up.
  15. Actually, the current Pajero Sport's platform dates back to 2006, though the actual Pajero Sport wasn't released until 2008. The one you're talking about there is the previous generation which was sold here as the G-Wagon.
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