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Tony M

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  1. As usual, the guidance from UKVI is ambiguous. It says this : Replace your BRP You’ll need to replace your biometric residence permit (BRP) if it’s lost, stolen or damaged and it was valid for at least another 3 months. How soon you must replace it depends on where it was lost or stolen. You may also have to replace your BRP if your personal details have changed, for example you’ve changed your name. You can be fined up to £1,000 and made to leave the UK if you don’t apply for a replacement in time. If your BRP was lost, stolen or damaged in the UK You must apply for a replacement BRP within 3 months. If your BRP was lost, stolen or damaged outside the UK You can’t apply for a replacement BRP outside the UK. You’ll need a ‘replacement BRP visa’ which lets you re-enter the UK once only - you must apply online in most countries. It costs £169. You must apply for a replacement BRP within 1 month of your return to the UK. The way that reads, it seems to say that you shouldn't leave the UK if you lost your BRP in the UK ?
  2. You cannot get any waiver, and BRPs are not issued overseas.. You will need to apply for a "replacement BRP visa" while in Thailand. It costs 169 GBP at the moment, but that is likely to rise in April. You must apply for the replacement BRP itself within one month of arriving back in the UK.
  3. It'a a good question, and the answer must be, who knows. The current wording was introduced just last year, in April 2017. It was kind of hidden in Command Paper 1078 (my emphahsis below) : THE STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN IMMIGRATION RULES PRESENTED TO PARLIAMENT ON 16 MARCH 2017 (HC 1078) Changes to Appendix FM-SE FM-SE1. In paragraph 9, for sub-paragraph (a)(i), substitute: “(i) the person is either a director or employee of the company, or both, or of another company within the same group; and”. FM-SE2. In paragraph 9(c), for “Where the person is listed as a director of the company”, substitute “Where the person is either listed as a director of the company, or is an employee of the company, or both,”. FM-SE3. In paragraph 9(c)(ii), after “as a director” insert “or employee of the company (or both)”. FM-SE4. In paragraph 9(e), for “as a director of the company”, in the first place it occurs, substitute “as a director or other employee of the company,”. FM-SE5. In paragraph 9(e), for “as a director of the company”, in the second place it occurs, substitute “as a director or employee of the company (or both)”. 7.36. The following changes and clarifications are being made to the Immigration Rules relating to family and private life: • To clarify that a person who wishes to enter the UK as a fiancé(e) or proposed civil partner to enable them to marry or form a civil partnership here must be free to marry or form a civil partnership at the date of application. • To add Police Injury Pension, alongside the Armed Forces equivalents, to the list of specified benefits received by the sponsor which mean that an applicant is exempt from the requirement to meet the minimum income threshold. • To ensure that limited leave to remain granted to a child in line with the leave granted to their parent is subject to the same condition as to recourse to public funds. • To clarify that a person who is not a director, but is an employee, of a specified limited company must meet the specified evidential requirements in respect of income from such a company. • To clarify that payment for travel time (e.g. for a care worker travelling between appointments) can be accepted as employment income. • To confirm that, for the purposes of the family Immigration Rules, a marriage in the UK must be recognised under marriage law in the relevant part of the UK. • To make other minor changes and clarifications. So, although the OP has obtained guidance from a visa agency, I still think that the answer is that he cannot qualify under Category A or B. Perhaps the agency was not aware of the changes. I certainly wasn't. I guess that the reason for the additional requirements must be because it would be easy for a company to "employ" (for just 6 months) a family member in order to meet the requirement ?
  4. Thanks for the info, but it does seem to go against the guidance ? Let us know how it turns out, please.
  5. I think the answer is no, unless there are more than 5 other shareholders. It appears to be a sole or limited family partnership. This is what you need to know : 5.5.13. Where a person is either a director or employee of a limited company in the UK, or both and receives a salary from that company, that salaried income can be counted under Category A or Category B, provided that the limited company is not of a type specified in paragraph 9(a) of Appendix FM-SE (i.e. it is not in sole or limited family ownership). Evidence of the type of company must be provided, which can include the latest Annual Return filed at Companies House. A fee paid to a person appointed as a non-executive director of a company (and this is not a limited company in the UK of the type specified in paragraph 9(a) of Appendix FM-SE) instead of a salary may be treated and evidenced as though it were a salary paid for employment in that capacity 5.5.14. Paragraph 9(a) of Appendix FM-SE states that the specified type of limited company is one in which: (i) the person is either a director or employee of the company, or both, or of another company within the same group; and (ii) shares are held (directly or indirectly) by the person, their partner or the following family members of the person or their partner: parent, grandparent, child, stepchild, grandchild, brother, sister, uncle, aunt, nephew, niece or first cousin; and (iii) any remaining shares are held (directly or indirectly) by fewer than five other persons. 5.5.15. Where a person receives a salary from employment as a director or employee (or both) of a limited company in the UK of the type specified in paragraph 9(a), that salaried income can only be counted under Category F or Category G, as appropriate. See section 9 of this guidance.
  6. Things may have changed since I was employed in an Embassy. UKVI can employ local staff of pretty much any nationality, but those staff will not be ECOs. This is mainly due to the security clearances required. This is from a recent ECO/ILO job advert : Due to the security requirements of the position applicants should be British, US, Australian, New Zealand, Canadian or EU national who have spent at least two of the last five years in their home countries.
  7. There might be some interest in the attached further information from the FCO job vacancy website. It does contain the useful information that the Embassy will actually be moving to Sathorn in 2019, not this year. For info, the B3 grade is the ECO grade : View Vacancy - BK - UKVI Country Manager, B3 (Internal Vacancy) The British Government is an inclusive and diversity-friendly employer. We value difference, promote equality and challenge discrimination, enhancing our organisational capability. We welcome and encourage applications from people of all backgrounds. We do not discriminate on the basis of disability, race, colour, ethnicity, gender, religion, sexual orientation, age, veteran status or other category protected by law. We promote family-friendly flexible working opportunities, where operational and security needs allow. Job Category Other British Government Departments (Partners across Government, including UK Visas) Job Subcategory UKVI (UK Visas and Immigration) Job Description (Roles and Responsibilities) In June 2018 UKVI will complete its consolidation of South East Asia visa-decision-making into UKVI Sheffield and UKVI New Delhi. Following the move of visa-decision-making to New Delhi in June 2018, UKVI will maintain a small support team in Bangkok. 5 posts will remain and they will support New Delhi colleagues by delivering: Visa writing (remote-printing) all SPV and PV applications made in Thailand, Vietnam, Laos, Burma and Cambodia. Document verification, enrichment and interview capacity for Thailand (and resources allowing for Cambodia, Laos and Burma and Vietnam). UKVI’s outreach and corporate messaging for key partners including FCO, British Council, MFA in Thailand, Laos, Burma and Cambodia to ensure UKVI’s work is fully understood by relevant partners. All relevant customer service expectations between UKVI in Sheffield, New Delhi and VFS-Global in Thailand, Burma, Laos and Cambodia to support UKVI and VFS. VAC and SELTs inspections as required. The role of the B3L Thailand Country Manager is to manage UKVI’s activities and A2L staff based in Thailand with support from the team in New Delhi. The job holder will report to an ECM in New Delhi and will receive daily support from the ECM team there. The job holder’s primary role will be to ensure all visa writing in Bangkok is managed, printed and dispatched to VFS within UKVI’s customer service standards. The job holder will also need to successfully balance all other competing operational demands throughout UKVI’s peak and low seasons, as well as on a day-to-day basis. The job holder will need to be an effective line manager able to performance manage and develop 4 x A2L staff into their new roles – each of which will be a multi-functional A2L role and will need to flex with UKVI’s changing operational priorities. Excellent communication skills will also be needed as the job holder will act as a bridge between stakeholders in South East Asia and the Decision-Making-Centres in Sheffield and New Delhi. The job holder will be exposed to a wide range of UKVI and FCO priorities and will absorb parts of B3L roles currently within the work objectives of the Workflow, Customer, Office and Enrichment Manager functions. Day to day contact with and support from UKVI colleagues in New Delhi and Sheffield will be the norm, as will proactive and regular contact with all key stakeholders across the region – from the most senior downwards. You will be representing UKVI and will thus be exposed to unique issues, giving the job holder excellent development opportunities as the job combines people management, operational delivery, stakeholder engagement and customer service. This job will be based in the current British embassy compound and will move with the rest of the embassy in 2019 to the new premises in Sathorn. The role is being offered on a permanent basis, however UKVI’s strategic direction is changing and there is a long-term goal to become digital by default, to handle more of our workload on-line, to introduce e-visas and remove the need for vignette printing. The pace of change is currently unknown but the job holder will need to be aware that changes in the future will have clear implications for this job.
  8. The earlier thread on this subject has been closed. However, there might be some interest in the attached further information from the FCO job vacancy website. It does contain the useful information that the Embassy will actually be moving to Sathorn in 2019, not this year. For info, the B3 grade is the ECO grade : View Vacancy - BK - UKVI Country Manager, B3 (Internal Vacancy) The British Government is an inclusive and diversity-friendly employer. We value difference, promote equality and challenge discrimination, enhancing our organisational capability. We welcome and encourage applications from people of all backgrounds. We do not discriminate on the basis of disability, race, colour, ethnicity, gender, religion, sexual orientation, age, veteran status or other category protected by law. We promote family-friendly flexible working opportunities, where operational and security needs allow. Job Category Other British Government Departments (Partners across Government, including UK Visas) Job Subcategory UKVI (UK Visas and Immigration) Job Description (Roles and Responsibilities) In June 2018 UKVI will complete its consolidation of South East Asia visa-decision-making into UKVI Sheffield and UKVI New Delhi. Following the move of visa-decision-making to New Delhi in June 2018, UKVI will maintain a small support team in Bangkok. 5 posts will remain and they will support New Delhi colleagues by delivering: Visa writing (remote-printing) all SPV and PV applications made in Thailand, Vietnam, Laos, Burma and Cambodia. Document verification, enrichment and interview capacity for Thailand (and resources allowing for Cambodia, Laos and Burma and Vietnam). UKVI’s outreach and corporate messaging for key partners including FCO, British Council, MFA in Thailand, Laos, Burma and Cambodia to ensure UKVI’s work is fully understood by relevant partners. All relevant customer service expectations between UKVI in Sheffield, New Delhi and VFS-Global in Thailand, Burma, Laos and Cambodia to support UKVI and VFS. VAC and SELTs inspections as required. The role of the B3L Thailand Country Manager is to manage UKVI’s activities and A2L staff based in Thailand with support from the team in New Delhi. The job holder will report to an ECM in New Delhi and will receive daily support from the ECM team there. The job holder’s primary role will be to ensure all visa writing in Bangkok is managed, printed and dispatched to VFS within UKVI’s customer service standards. The job holder will also need to successfully balance all other competing operational demands throughout UKVI’s peak and low seasons, as well as on a day-to-day basis. The job holder will need to be an effective line manager able to performance manage and develop 4 x A2L staff into their new roles – each of which will be a multi-functional A2L role and will need to flex with UKVI’s changing operational priorities. Excellent communication skills will also be needed as the job holder will act as a bridge between stakeholders in South East Asia and the Decision-Making-Centres in Sheffield and New Delhi. The job holder will be exposed to a wide range of UKVI and FCO priorities and will absorb parts of B3L roles currently within the work objectives of the Workflow, Customer, Office and Enrichment Manager functions. Day to day contact with and support from UKVI colleagues in New Delhi and Sheffield will be the norm, as will proactive and regular contact with all key stakeholders across the region – from the most senior downwards. You will be representing UKVI and will thus be exposed to unique issues, giving the job holder excellent development opportunities as the job combines people management, operational delivery, stakeholder engagement and customer service. This job will be based in the current British embassy compound and will move with the rest of the embassy in 2019 to the new premises in Sathorn. The role is being offered on a permanent basis, however UKVI’s strategic direction is changing and there is a long-term goal to become digital by default, to handle more of our workload on-line, to introduce e-visas and remove the need for vignette printing. The pace of change is currently unknown but the job holder will need to be aware that changes in the future will have clear implications for this job.
  9. Settlement visa are no longer scanned at VFS in Bangkok. The system failed miserably, and submitted documents could not be seen, or found, by the processing ECO in Sheffield. Not surprisingly, this has resulted in many applications being refused because "documents were not submitted". UKVI have made no attempt to review the refusal decisions, so applicants are having to appeal. Having charged (settlement) applicants around 2,500 GBP to process their application, UKVI have made no attempt to rectify their processing errors. The system is a complete mess. Currently, all documents must be sent by post to UKVI Sheffield. There is no scanning at all in Bangkok. The documentation must include a pre-paid addressed envelope for the documents to be returned to either the sponsor in the UK or the applicant (in Thailand, or wherever). The blurb from the British Embassy in Bangkok says that there will be no change to the current system of visit applications. So how will VFS, or UKVI Bangkok, get the documents to New Delhi ? The scanning system has been proven to have failings. We await further info from UKVI Bangkok. It's interesting to see that the Embassy, and UKVI, don't foresee any changes to their current service levels. Common sense would dictate that, if documents have to be sent physically to Delhi, then service standards will drop. Alternatively, if they use the scanning system which has already failed, then I guess that we can indeed expect no change in service standards, in that applications will continue to be refused on the grounds that "no documents were submitted". That would seem to be the current service standard. To answer another earlier posted question, Bangkok handles around 100,000 - 120,000 applications a year, of all categories. Some of those applications are from Cambodia, Myanmar, etc.
  10. You are right, but it could not be any worse that the processes that are in place at the moment. I get the impression that the UKVI have no real interest in detecting fraudulent applications and/or documents. Certainly, in times gone by, documents submitted with visa applications were fairly carefully scrutinised. That doesn't seem to be happening now, and it is clear that a fair proportion of fraudulent applications have been successful over recent years. The Australians have actual contact with applicants if they have doubts about possible fraud. They even have a form, that they send, or give, to the applicant, asking if they want to change anything in the application ( a copy is attached). The will to deal "properly" with UK visa applications seems to have been put aside in the interest of amassing revenue. In my opinion, of course. 1023.pdf
  11. The fun will, of course, continue when the Bangkok visa section closes down in about 6 months time. As I understand it, no decision has yet been finalised on where the visit visa applications from Thailand will be processed. It could be Sheffield, or it could be Abu Dhabi, or it could be somewhere else. However, if there is no scanning at VFS Bangkok, then applications will need to be sent to wherever the processing is being done, and a pre-paid addressed envelope supplied too. I wonder how easy it will be to get a pre-paid envelope from Abu Dhabi for documents to be sent back to Thailand. I suppose UKVI will, as usual, inform applicants where to send their applications at least a day or two in advance. Why can't UKVI just come up with a reasonable system, perhaps along the lines of the Australian system, whereby applicant/sponsors scan and upload their own documents, from home or wherever to the Aussie immigration service ?
  12. CaptainScurvy - firstly, the decision to send the documents to UKVI in the UK, from Thailand or from UK, must be yours, and should be in the interest of making the whole process easy, if possible. For settlement applications it is often the case that most of documents required are from the sponsor. In that case, it would make sense for your wife to send her documents to you, and for you to send everything to UKVI, with a return envelope to you too. Some documents, such as your marriage certificate, you should have anyway, as you were issued with two. You will need translations though. Original passports should never be sent with an application. Copies of the passports, and the birth certificates will be fine (with translations where necessary). There could be many reasons for stopping the service. For instance, the system was hurriedly introduced, and may not have been tested properly. The scanning equipment was possibly not the best, and maybe did not perform as well as hoped (or maybe VFS staff were unable to process the scanning properly). Maybe UKVI realised that they would only be getting scans of documents, or of copies of documents, and could not tell if those documents were actually genuine. Relying on VFS staff to determine whether a document is genuine or not must be one of the most ridiculous decisions ever made by UKVI. BUT, what is known is that the system does not work. UKVI have refused many settlement applications since the process was moved to Sheffield, on the grounds that documents were not submitted, when in fact they were. For some reason, ECOs were not able to access, or to find, or to see, all of the submitted (scanned) documents. This led to multiple refusal decisions, and UKVI still haven't reviewed all of them. It is a shambles. Of course, UKVI have made no comment, apology, or explanation for any of this.
  13. For information. Last week, VFS in Trendy building, Bangkok (and therefore UKVI) ended the document scanning service (for settlement visa applications) without any warning. Applicants who turned up, with appointments, to submit their applications, were told that it is now necessary to submit all documents to UKVI in the UK by mail. The VFS website now says : Settlement application - All customers applying for UK settlement, including Priority Visa applicants, must send their supporting documentation directly to UKVI in Sheffield, UK by post. Prior to sending any documentation to UKVI, applicants should make sure that the courier company they are planning to use will deliver to Post Office (PO) Box addresses in the UK. DHL will not deliver to UK PO Box addresses. Thai Post do a service, but the cost is high. A 2 kilo package (if the documents include such things as chat app printouts, bank statements, etc) costs around 75 - 80 GBP to send from Thailand to UK. A pre-paid addressed envelope must also be included with the documents for them to be sent back (or to any other address). Applicant must still attend to give biometrics. Passport will be kept by VFS to pass on to the Embassy.
  14. rayza

    I don't think that you understand what you are being told. She cannot live in the UK by using visit visas. Going back to Thailand for a couple of weeks, and then returning to UK to look after you for another 6 months does not constitute "visits". She will be refused entry for using visit visas to reside in the UK. The accepted minimum period out of UK, between visits, is 6 months, although this is not written in stone.
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