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BANGKOK 15 November 2018 17:22

JungleBiker

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Everything posted by JungleBiker

  1. JungleBiker

    This years Blackberry and Raspberry setup

    I'm interested to know what are you using to pin down the edges of the plastic mulch? Are you going to plant strawberries in the middle beds?
  2. JungleBiker

    Durian leaf antracnose

    No, it's definitely not slow release. You mix it with water and apply. 50 - 100 grams per 20 litres (typical volume of a knapsack sprayer). Spray over the plant. Made by Haifa of Israel but put into 1kg packs by a Thai company - with Thai and English script on the label. Yes, there are different formulations such as 6-12-40 + Mg and ME for fruit growth/quality.
  3. JungleBiker

    Durian leaf antracnose

    Polyfeed 20-20-20 + magnesium and micro nutrients. From Israel. Sold in Thai shops in green-plastic-foil packs of 1kg for about 120 baht or so. I don't think it contains any calcium so you might want to also spray some calcium nitrate as a separate spray.
  4. JungleBiker

    Durian leaf antracnose

    The same fungus (Colletotrichum gloeosporoides) that causes anthracnose in durian also causes anthracnose in avocado, and the fungicides used for avocado are: (a) Copper-based fungicides - they are protective not curative, and can be used by organic growers; and (b) Amistar (active ingredient: azoxystrobin) which is systemic and has partial curative properaties but should not be sprayed too many times per season. Amistar is made by Syngenta. There are other brands of azoxystrobin that are cheaper. All of the above are easy to find in Thai agrochemical shops.
  5. JungleBiker

    Blueberries and blackberries in Thailand

    OK, so you're talking about a shop selling plants. Thanks.
  6. JungleBiker

    Blueberries and blackberries in Thailand

    When you say "loads of berries' are you talking about berry plants or berry fruits?
  7. JungleBiker

    Exporters urged to cash in on Afta

    Most but not all goods are eligible for tarrif-free imports. I don't know if beer is one that isn't, (perhaps to protect the mega rich shareholders of the Thai beer companies?). There is a website somewhere that gives details of what is covered or not.
  8. "He also advised people to wash vegetables several times, and eat detoxifying herbs such as laurel clockvine." And has the laurel clockvine been grown using the same chemicals? ?
  9. JungleBiker

    Exporters urged to cash in on Afta

    If I understand correctly, it is the exporter who has to spend time and money getting the Form D but it is the importer that benefits from the tariff savings (not the exporter). The importer can't force the exporter to get the Form D.
  10. JungleBiker

    Name of this fruit in English?

    By the way, I noticed in the photo that the durian is priced at 150 baht/kg. That alone is a lot of money to pay for fruit but when you deduct the weight of the shell and seeds, I guess the price per kilogram of edible flesh is going to be at least 2 times that. That's an incredible price for a tree fruit produced in Thailand. The reason it is so high is because China is sucking out most of the durian produced in Thailand. Consequently I bet per capita consumption of durian by Thai people is lower that it was say 10 - 20 years ago. A similar trend has happened with avocado in Mexico.
  11. JungleBiker

    Name of this fruit in English?

    According to a book I have (PROSEA No 2 Edible Fruits and Nuts), tampoi is a Malaysian name for Baccaurea ramiflora, with English name Burmese grape. The Thai names given for this species are mafai, somfai and hamkang. There are other species of Baccaurea, so the fruit in your photo may be from one of the other species; perhaps Baccaurea dulcis? (With English name shown as "Ketupa" but no Thai name is given).
  12. It seems you missed the words, "one of", in the sentence, "...one of the most horrific acts...".
  13. JungleBiker

    Indigo seeds

    This youtube is based on the village in Savannakhet I tried searching for the textile company mentioned - they used to have a shop in Vientiane - but it seems they may no longer be around.
  14. JungleBiker

    Indigo seeds

    You could try contacting these people https://www.saobancrafts.com You will see reference to indigo on this page https://www.saobancrafts.com/our-artisans/ if you click on the tab: Ms. Mae Mai Cotton artisan and indigo dye expert Savannakhet Province You can read about the founder of this organization at the web. He disappeared some years ago. If you PM me I will give you the email of his wife.
  15. JungleBiker

    Indigo seeds

    I know a village in Savannakhet Province of Laos where they grow indigo for dying the cotton fabrics that they also produce. They also grow other plants for natural dyes of various colours (for example I think I remember they get a red or brown dye from guava). But I'm sorry I don't have other information or contact numbers. You could try joining the LaoFAB forum via GoogleGroups and post an enquiry there. It's a forum for people involved in agriculture in Laos (mainly in agricultural development) with about 1,500 members. It's in English language.
  16. JungleBiker

    Grass for cattle

    Michael Hare, who posted at the top of this page 3 March 2017, is the man to talk to about Mombassa Guinea. He can supply you the seed and give info. I have some Mombasa growing in my garden. It grows upright which makes it easy to cut, similar to Napier. But it is more leafy and less stemmy than napier.
  17. JungleBiker

    Container Soil - Growing Medium

    Well the other approach, widely used for greenhouse crops grown all over the world, including the cannabis mentioned earlier, is to fill the container (or trough or bag) with a substrate such as coir, perlite, carbonized rice hulls, parboiled rice hulls, clay balls, rock wool, etc. And then add all the nutrients required by the plants every time you irrigate (fertigate).
  18. JungleBiker

    Pigs 101 (A Start)

    In case you didn't already know, here's a heads up... Google: Bangkok Post African Swine Fever Elsewhere, I have read that it is not a question of if ASF will come to your pig farm but when.
  19. JungleBiker

    Maize and Rotational Crops

    So the trick is to pile the soil up on the inside of your boundary trench - as in the photo.
  20. JungleBiker

    Bought 12 Cows have limited knowledge

    [I messed up the editing of the quote just now] If you google these 4 words: forage age protein fibre You will find lots of web pages explaining how protein levels fall and fibre levels increase as the forage gets older. Alternatively, you could get your FIL to submit samples of young and old grass to a laboratory to have the crude protein and fibre levels measured.
  21. JungleBiker

    Bought 12 Cows have limited knowledge

    If you google these 4 words: forage age protein fibre You will find lots of web pages explaining how protein levels fall and fibre levels increase as the forage gets older. Alternatively, you could get your FIL to submit samples of young and old grass to a laboratory to have the crude protein and fibre levels measured.
  22. JungleBiker

    Maize and Rotational Crops

    Here's an example...
  23. JungleBiker

    Maize and Rotational Crops

    Where I am here in Laos, the locals will cut barbed wire fences to allow their cattle to eat any grass growing on your land. I've lost a lot of money (100s of thousands of baht) in terms of damaged fruit crops as result of this criminal practice. They will even steal your barbed wire! And fence posts! Just 2 weeks ago, a guy working for me had this happen to him and the cows grazed all his newly planted avocado trees (150 of them) and some other fruit plants. He was so angry he mixed up a bucket of water and urea fertiliser. 4 cows died. He ended up having to pay some compensation to the criminal! The criminal in this case being a local policeman! What the big farming companies here do to prevent this kind of problem is dig a 2 metre wide x 2 metre deep trench around the farm boundary. The combination of the trench plus the soil removed and piled up more than 2 metres higher on one side creates a good barrier for both animals and people. It costs around 60,000 - 80,000 baht per kilometre. I think it's cheaper than a barbed wire fence when you factor in the labour cost for building the fence. The disdavantage is that it eats up some of your land.
  24. JungleBiker

    Hemarroids for over 4 months

    Well if I don't eat porridge and exercise regularly I can get external hemorrhoids. It works for me and may work for the OP.
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