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M1Tanker

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About M1Tanker

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  1. M1Tanker

    Doubletake mirrors in Thailand

    I have the Doubletake Adventure mirrors on my BMW R1200GS Adventure. What I discovered unique to my motorcycle was that the XL Ram arm interfered with the factory fog light switch housing located on top of the left hand controls. The switch housing limited the range of motion to the point that I purchased SW Motech mirror extenders to increase the range of motion and not interfere with the fog light switch housing. In order to get the SW Motech mirror extender to also not interfere with the fog light switch housing I had to adjust the angle of depression/elevation of the left hand controls. This wasn't a universally wonderful solution, but somewhat workable. I also discovered that the range of motion for the Doubletake mirrors is limited by the Ram arm itself. The range of motion is quite good when adjustments are made in the same plane as the opening between the two clamping sides of the Ram arm. However the range of motion is limited when adjustments are attempted in a plane not completely parallel (moving towards perpendicular) to the opening between the clamping sides of the Ram arm. Finally, I could make fairly good adjustments to my stock BMW mirrors with one hand even while on the move. The Doubletake mirror requires all adjustments to be made with two hands (one hand loosens the Ram arm wing nut and the other hand moves the mirror and or Ram arm itself) and I had to stop in order to make the adjustments. The Doubletake mirrors have some advantages when going off road. If the bike is dropped then the mirror may rotate out of the way without breaking anything. I haven't tested this but I say "may" because when the Ram arm is tightened down it is still fairly tight and I'm not totally convinced that there will be no damage in a fall. Having said that, these mirrors can be adjusted to a much safer position for riding off road whereas the stock mirrors cannot and must be totally removed. One more thing to note. When I received the Doubletake Adventure mirrors and mounting hardware, one of the Ram ball stud bases wasn't the same as the other. The thread pitch was slightly different than the other Ram ball stud base. The difference was so slight that I didn't notice it and it ended up damaging the threads in the aluminum BMW mirror bracket. It took weeks for me to get a replacement mirror bracket. I'm not sure if there was a manufacturing quality control issue with this one particular Ram ball stud base or a packing mistake and that Ram ball stud base was actually for a different motorcycle and mirror bracket with different thread pitch. I ended up getting a replacement Ram ball stud base with the proper thread pitch and there were no issues.
  2. M1Tanker

    Customs duty on imported motorcycle

    You are welcome. I hope the information is useful. You can contact Thai Customs as well as the Department of Foreign Trade. I found Thai Customs Customer Service to be helpful. PM me if you have any additional questions.
  3. M1Tanker

    Customs duty on imported motorcycle

    The purchase cost of my 2008 R1200GS Adventure (U.S. specification) was $17,700. I purchased the motorcycle through the BMW Military Sales program in Germany and no tax was paid. That price was considerably less than the same European specification motorcycle sold to Germans. My motorcycle was registered in the U.S. system and not in the German system in accordance with the Status of Forces Agreement between the U.S. and Germany. As part of my decision making process I needed to determine if it would make sense to sell the motorcycle in Germany prior to my move and take that money and apply it to purchasing the equivalent motorcycle in Thailand. I could either sell the motorcycle to a German or to a U.S. service member or U.S. government worker in Germany. The issue with selling the motorcycle to a German was that it didn't have a German TUV which is required in order to have it registered and plated. In order to make the motorcycle attractive to a German I would need to get it into the German system. The other issue is that any German that bought it would have to pay the original sales tax, into the German system, and amazingly enough a small import fee. These additional taxes priced my motorcycle out of the market for a German. The BMW GS family is the best selling motorcycle in Germany. There is no shortage of good used models available that would be readily available with less bureaucracy and at a cheaper cost. The issue with selling a used BMW GS to a U.S. service member or government worker in Germany is the market is very small. The usual customer for the GS is a higher ranking service member or government worker. Most of those potential customers would rather buy new for through the BMW military sales program. The final option to sell my motorcycle was to sell it in the U.S. from Germany but I would have to discount it considerably in order to even get someone interested. Shipping would also be an issue. Therefore it really wasn't an option. The year prior to my actual move I did check for used equivalents here in Thailand. I found one 2009 BMW R1200GS Adventure. It was the same color, Red, and it cost about 880,000 baht if my memory serves me correctly. That was roughly equivalent to my original purchase price and I didn't know the history of the motorcycle as I did mine. A new BMW R1200GS Adventure cost over 1 million baht and still does. As part of this process I built a Excel spreadsheet based on the Thai Customs formulae. I had a friend independently build one as well. We were within about 1,000 baht of each other. That speadsheet cost as well as the aforementioned led me to pursue importing my motorcycle. My training has taught me to not depend on luck, chance, or hope. I don't deny that sometimes things happen that are better than what was planned or worse than what was planned but I decided to do considerable research and communicate with the respective Thai government organizations to improve my chances of success and reduce the probability of failure. Every person's situation is different. If my motorcycle was in the German system and taxes were already paid for I probably would have sold it. The same applies if I was stationed in the U.S. I would have taken the money and applied it to a motorcycle purchase here in Thailand. However, both were not the case. As previously stated alI personnel that I interacted with at all applicable Thai government agencies were professional and ethical. There was no extortion. I will point out that many of the personnel in these offices are not completely familiar with permanently importing a motorcycle because they just don't see it happen that often. Patience, thoroughness, and professional determination are required. I found that researching the process online, asking a lot of questions, and communicating with each office in person or online to be effective. Again, I started the process over a year prior to shipping my motorcycle. The point of my reposting my experiences is that importation is possible depending on the circumstances of the foreigner's visa status and the documentation of the vehicle. Having said that, importing although possible for an individual may not always make sense.
  4. M1Tanker

    Customs duty on imported motorcycle

    Final U.S. Army retirement permanent change of station is free to the service members back to the U.S.A. or other destination equal to that cost or less. The cost to ship to Thailand was cheaper than to higher shipping cost locations in the U.S.. This move fell into this category.
  5. M1Tanker

    Customs duty on imported motorcycle

    Shipping cost for me was zero. Import costs were around 240,000 baht, which is less than the value of the motorcycle as per Kelley Blue Book (KBB) (https://www.kbb.com). With that said the Thai Customs did not use the KBB valuation because I had all of the original sales documents. They used the original sales price as the starting point and deducted a percentage due to age. There was no emissions test on my motorcycle. I didn't avoid it because it would have passed any emissions test, but I didn't see any emissions testing equipment at the customs warehouse and it was not required at the Buriram Department of Land Transport.
  6. M1Tanker

    Customs duty on imported motorcycle

    Just trying to provide some first hand experience that may benefit others.
  7. M1Tanker

    Customs duty on imported motorcycle

    One more time....with feeling. For what it is worth, This is a repost of previously posted information on Thaivisa. I completed the permanent importation of my motorcycle (2008 BMW R1200GS Adventure) into Thailand in 2016. I also obtained the green registration book and Thai license plate. The process was long and required a lot of paperwork. Here are some recommended questions to answer prior to starting an attempt to import a motorcycle (or automobile) into Thailand: Are you trying to permanently import your motorcycle (or automobile)? What kind of visa will you be coming to Thailand on? How well documented is your motorcycle (or automobile)? All original sales documentation? All registration documents? Motorcycle driver's licenses to include expired and international drivers licenses? Is there a lien against the motorcycle? Do you have a yellow tambien baan (house registration)? (NOTE: This was the first key Thai document that I needed to proceed onto dealing with the Department of Foreign Trade and Thai Customs. This was incredibly bureaucratic for me.) There are two Thai government agencies that one needs to interact with in order to permanently import a motorcycle into Thailand: 1. Department of Foreign Trade within the Ministry of Commerce (NOTE: An import license must be obtained as well as an import permit for the motorcycle. I did NOT obtain these critical documents from the Department of Transportation.) 2. Customs Department (http://en.customs.go.th/content.php?ini_content=individuals_151007_01&lang=en&left_menu=menu_individuals_151007_01). (NOTE: In the link Thai Customs states "Criteria for a Permanent Import of Used/Secondhand Vehicles" states "An importer is eligible to import only ONE used/ secondhand vehicles for personal use.") 3. (NOTE: I did contact the Thai Industrial Standards Institute and they informed me that because I was importing a used/second hand motorcycle they did not play a role in the importation process.) I did have to pay import duties and the motorcycle was depreciated in accordance with the formula that can be found in the Thai Customs link above. The cost wasn't zero baht but it was considerably less than a new or used equivalent BMW here in Thailand. Once I completed the importation, I then took that paperwork to my local Department of Transport. I filled out more paperwork and paid a small processing fee. Weeks later I received my green registration book and license plate. AlI personnel that I interacted with at all of the aforementioned Thai government agencies were professional and ethical. I will point out that many of the personnel in these offices are not completely familiar with permanently importing a motorcycle because they just don't see it happen that often. Patience, thoroughness, and professional determination are required. I found that researching the process online, asking a lot of questions, and communicating with each office in person or online to be effective. I started the process over a year prior to shipping my motorcycle. The other question to ask yourself before embarking on such an endeavor is whether or not the vehicle is supportable in Thailand. If you are planning on bringing a vehicle that was not sold or is not sold in the Thai market then getting parts and service will be a challenge. If you or anyone else have additional questions regarding my experiences permanently importing a motorcycle into Thailand just PM me.
  8. M1Tanker

    Car import - worth an attempt?

    For what it is worth, This is a repost of previously posted information on Thaivisa. I completed the permanent importation of my motorcycle (2008 BMW R1200GS Adventure) into Thailand in 2016. I also obtained the green registration book and Thai license plate. The process was long and required a lot of paperwork. Here are some recommended questions to answer prior to starting an attempt to import a motorcycle (or automobile) into Thailand: Are you trying to permanently import your motorcycle (or automobile)? What kind of visa will you be coming to Thailand on? How well documented is your motorcycle (or automobile)? All original sales documentation? All registration documents? Motorcycle driver's licenses to include expired and international drivers licenses? Is there a lien against the motorcycle? Do you have a yellow tambien baan (house registration)? (NOTE: This was the first key Thai document that I needed to proceed onto dealing with the Department of Foreign Trade and Thai Customs. This was incredibly bureaucratic for me.) There are two Thai government agencies that one needs to interact with in order to permanently import a motorcycle into Thailand: 1. Department of Foreign Trade within the Ministry of Commerce (NOTE: An import license must be obtained as well as an import permit for the motorcycle. I did NOT obtain these critical documents from the Department of Transportation.) 2. Customs Department (http://en.customs.go.th/content.php?ini_content=individuals_151007_01&lang=en&left_menu=menu_individuals_151007_01). (NOTE: The states "Criteria for a Permanent Import of Used/Secondhand Vehicles" states "An importer is eligible to import only ONE used/ secondhand vehicles for personal use.") 3. (NOTE: I did contact the Thai Industrial Standards Institute and they informed me that because I was importing a used/second hand motorcycle they did not play a role in the importation process.) I did have to pay import duties and the motorcycle was depreciated in accordance with the formula that can be found in the Thai Customs link above. The cost wasn't zero baht but it was considerably less than a new or used equivalent BMW here in Thailand. Once I completed the importation, I then took that paperwork to my local Department of Transport. I filled out more paperwork and paid a small processing fee. Weeks later I received my green registration book and license plate. AlI personnel that I interacted with at all of the aforementioned Thai government agencies were professional and ethical. I will point out that many of the personnel in these offices are not completely familiar with permanently importing a motorcycle because they just don't see it happen that often. Patience, thoroughness, and professional determination are required. I found that researching the process online, asking a lot of questions, and communicating with each office in person or online to be effective. I started the process over a year prior to shipping my motorcycle. The other question to ask yourself before embarking on such an endeavor is whether or not the vehicle is supportable in Thailand. If you are planning on bringing a vehicle that was not sold or is not sold in the Thai market then getting parts and service will be a challenge. If you or anyone else have additional questions regarding my experiences permanently importing a motorcycle into Thailand just PM me.
  9. M1Tanker

    How to imports used Vehicle into Thailand

    Lancashirelad, That is an interesting point. I don't have a good answer for you. When I embarked on my effort to see whether or not I could import my motorcycle and if it was even feasible, I checked a number of Thai expat forums, including this forum, as well as English speaking Thai motorcycle forums. Not a single reply that I received was from someone that actually imported a motorcycle or even attempted it. All responses provided 3rd hand information or anecdotal information. I received no replies from someone that actually imported a motorcycle or even attempted it. I also could find no posts of someone with actual experience. Most posts or replies were not even based on facts. I contacted the respective Thai government agencies and followed the instructions provided. I didn't challenge what they instructed when I had no basis but I did challenge them as to whether or not they were going to adhere to published law/policy.
  10. M1Tanker

    How to imports used Vehicle into Thailand

    LammyTS1, I recommend contacting Thai Customs. The link previously provided has the contact information. Ask them. Additionally, if you have a vintage scooter, such as a vintage Vespa, then I suggest searching for Thai clubs for your vintage make.
  11. M1Tanker

    Carryboy distributor

    Jack james, I believe there is a Carryboy dealer on Thani Alley in downtown Buriram (https://www.facebook.com/chaiautoair). Also, the only company that I have found in all of Thailand that does a spray-on bedliner is Line-X and it has one location in Bangkok (https://www.facebook.com/line.x.thai/ and http://line-x-thailand.com.) Check this thread:
  12. M1Tanker

    How to imports used Vehicle into Thailand

    NonthaburiBear and anyone else, I completed the permanent importation of my motorcycle (2008 BMW R1200GS Adventure) into Thailand in 2016. I also obtained the green registration book and Thai license plate. The process was long and required a lot of paperwork. Here are some recommended questions to answer prior to starting an attempt to import a motorcycle (or automobile) into Thailand: Are you trying to permanently import your motorcycle (or automobile)? What kind of visa will you be coming to Thailand on? How well documented is your motorcycle (or automobile)? All original sales documentation? All registration documents? Motorcycle driver's licenses to include expired and international drivers licenses? Is there a lien against the motorcycle? Do you have a yellow tambien baan (house registration)? (NOTE: This was the first key Thai document that I needed to proceed onto dealing with the Department of Foreign Trade and Thai Customs. This was incredibly bureaucratic for me.) There are two Thai government agencies that one needs to interact with in order to permanently import a motorcycle into Thailand: 1. Department of Foreign Trade within the Ministry of Commerce (NOTE: An import license must be obtained as well as an import permit for the motorcycle. I did NOT obtain these critical documents from the Department of Transportation.) 2. Customs Department (http://en.customs.go.th/content.php?ini_content=individuals_151007_01&lang=en&left_menu=menu_individuals_151007_01). (NOTE: The states "Criteria for a Permanent Import of Used/Secondhand Vehicles" states "An importer is eligible to import only ONE used/ secondhand vehicles for personal use.") 3. (NOTE: I did contact the Thai Industrial Standards Institute and they informed me that because I was importing a used/second hand motorcycle they did not play a role in the importation process.) I did have to pay import duties and the motorcycle was depreciated in accordance with the formula that can be found in the Thai Customs link above. The cost wasn't zero baht but it was considerably less than a new or used equivalent BMW here in Thailand. Once I completed the importation, I then took that paperwork to my local Department of Transport. I filled out more paperwork and paid a small processing fee. Weeks later I received my green registration book and license plate. AlI personnel that I interacted with at all of the aforementioned Thai government agencies were professional and ethical. I will point out that many of the personnel in these offices are not completely familiar with permanently importing a motorcycle because they just don't see it happen that often. Patience, thoroughness, and professional determination are required. I found that researching the process online, asking a lot of questions, and communicating with each office in person or online to be effective. I started the process over a year prior to shipping my motorcycle. The other question to ask yourself before embarking on such an endeavor is whether or not the vehicle is supportable in Thailand. If you are planning on bringing a vehicle that was not sold or is not sold in the Thai market then getting parts and service will be a challenge. If you or anyone else have additional questions regarding my experiences permanently importing a motorcycle into Thailand just PM me.
  13. Here are some of the Garmin products that I own: zūmo 660; Purchased from Touratech in Germany; Registered on my.garmin.com. City Navigator Europe NT 2016.20 - Map+P+3D,Sept 15 (maps for life North America and Europe); Purchased from Touratech in Germany; Registered on my.garmin.com Thailand City Navigator (TCN); Purchased from GPS4YOU ((https://gps4you.ecwid.com)) at IT Fortune Mall in Bangkok, Thailand; NOT registered on my.garmin.com. I currently have the Thailand City Navigator on my zūmo 660. On the Map Info tab of the zūmo 660 it describes the map as “CN Thailand NT 2015.10 (Eng)" and it has been subsequently updated to CN Thailand NT 2016.20 and then CN Thailand NT 2016.40. The only way that I could update the map was to actually go to GPS4YOU and have them do it. I could not do it online. Do any of you have a similar experience? I cannot seem to register the Thailand City Navigator map on my.garmin.com as all of my other Garmin products are. I have no idea why. Has anyone been able to register this particular map?Also, when I launch Garmin Express with my Zumo 660 plugged into my iMac, Garmin Express recognizes the Zumo 660 but states that there is an update for Full Coverage of Europe. It doesn't recognize the Thailand map. What do I do so that Garmin Express recognizes this map? When I launch Garmin BaseCamp it does recognize the Thailand City Navigator.I did some research online and I cannot find the aforementioned Thai map on any Garmin website. I have found City Navigator Southeast Asia NT (City Navigator® Southeast Asia NT | Garmin) . Does it have the same level of detail for Thailand as the Thailand City Navigator that I bought at GPS4YOU?Here is are images of the packaging for the Thailand map that I have:
  14. M1Tanker

    Spray-on Bedliner

    Thanks. Prior to placing my order with Sammitr, I discussed this with them as well as with the staff at Toyota Buriram, where the installation will take place.
  15. M1Tanker

    Spray-on Bedliner

    One detail I left out that influenced my decision making was that the Sammitr S-Plus V2 canopy/topper will be removable. I wanted that option therefore the canopy/topper will not be permanently sealed or glued to the bedliner (or bed rails as with a spray-on liner) or the pickup cab. If I left the plastic drop-in liner in, holes would be cut into it allowing the attaching mechanisms to pass through. If I pull the canopy off then these holes will allow for rain water to ingress under the liner. Unfortunately I do not have pictures of my bed when the plastic drop-in liner was removed. The bed was marred as were the tops of the bed rails. Even the upper portions of the left and right quarter panels where the drop-in liner touched it were marred and not just the areas under the bedliner edges. I was hoping to just have the Line-X coating applied under the rails but because of the aforementioned marring of the top rails and the area over the rails I had the coating applied over the rails.
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