owl sees all

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About owl sees all

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  • Birthday 11/01/1947

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    down town up country

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  1. I think we have to look at this whole debate in different ways. Yin Shin is actually addressing the Military in words and print. The only people I actually saw that physically stood up to them was at that big temple. The Junta can't afford any dissent. They have to crack down to keep everyone believing that what they do is for the good. When the Military fist took charge our local eating place had two posters on the wall. One was a poster of Abbisit with blood all over his hands had been there for a couple of years. Straight after the coup the other was put up (words in Thai); "It has not gone unnoticed that the people that were killing us are now ruling us". They were taken down within a week; not seen since. In the next village to me they will never forget one of their sons who was killed by a sniper in Bangkok. Always under the surface there is seething and hatred. Suddenly an incident could ignite the gunpowder. Remember the Arab Spring? I'm a staunch democrat but I hope I'm not a blinkered one. The Shins were not perfect and neither the Junta but there is more to bringing a country out of the third world than simply citing 'democracy'. Although that would be a start, the cornerstones of Thailand have to be addressed and reformed. The things I value most are love, truth, honesty, freedom and humour. The integrity for any is severely tested every day in Thailand.
  2. Along with the obvious, democracy should also enclose a fair and impartial judicial system, a police force that serves the people and corrupt free state employees. All countries see the role of their military differently. But in most democratic countries the military is instructed by parliament. It just goes to show just how fragile Thai democracy is, always has been and maybe always will be. And the biggest problem we can't talk about. We live in hope BUT!!!
  3. When i first came to Isaan it was sooooo... backward. Many villages had no electricity; no running water; poor roads; inadequate medical and education systems. There have been massive improvements in many areas and there is still so much to do' no matter who rules the roost. The Shins tapped into the inequality syndrome. They gave the people a voice (which they had never had before) made them feel as though they mattered. Surely it was their obligation to the vast majority of Thai people to redistribute the huge wealth of the country!?
  4. I like your thinking on this sir. Democracy is a two edged sword. It is being able to vote for a person (or party) who will govern the country on behalf of, and for the benefit of, the people. And the country then respecting the vote (outcome) and allowing the person (or party) to get on with doing what they promised they would.
  5. 01. farang meets Isaan girl in Pattaya. 02. farang sh-gs Issan girl. 03. farang marries Issan girl. 04. girl takes farang home to meet her family. 05. family borrow a little of farang's money. 06. family pay money back as they said they would. 07. family suggests a business idea that can't fail. 08. wife turns nympho 09. farang lends family all he has for business venture. 10. business goes kaput - all money lost. 11. farang asks for loan to be repaid. 12. family get angry with bad farang. 13. wife and farang start to argue. 14. wife questions why farang is now so poor. 15. wife turns celibate. 16. divorce/suicide/accidental death.
  6. Just a common theme. 01. farang meets Isaan girl in Pattaya. 02. farang sh-gs Issan girl. 03. farang marries Issan girl. 04. girl takes farang home to meet her family. 05. family borrow a little of farang's money. 06. family pay money back as they said they would. 07. family suggests a business idea that can't fail. 08. wife turns nympho 09. farang lends family all he has for business venture. 10. business goes kaput - all money lost. 11. farang asks for loan to be repaid. 12. family get angry with bad farang. 13. wife and farang start to argue. 14. wife questions why farang is now so poor. 15. wife turns celebate. 16. divorce/suicide/accidental death. Farang beware!
  7. If there was a 'fair and open' election, Y Shin's party (whatever they might be called) would sweep to power with 70% plus. The difference is that the military, through their changes and reforms, would have no intention of letting the government run the country. The military will be an iron fist in a velvet glove for years to come.
  8. At the last election her party gained over 70% of the vote. She, through her government, had an obligation to try to redistribute Thailand's huge wealth. The 5 cornerstones of Thailand are; Monachy Military Religion Courts Parliament She found out, as did her brother, that democracy, through parliament, was by far the weakest.
  9. I agree!!. I know an Englisg guy who was held to ransom over a child from his relationship. He didn't get the custody of the boy (7 years). After a few months of being a bit less well off the ex-wife agreed to do a deal on the lad for some regular dosh in her pocket. All well that ends well!!
  10. Strange indeed!! It was absolutely outrageous!! My friend had contacted the man's family two days earlier and told them that he was very ill in hospital. His son and the son's wife left ASAP from OZ. As soon as they were told about the death (by the same pal) they contacted the Australian Embassy in BKK to voice their concerns. They said they would get an officer up to the village. The son was in Udon when he was cremated. The Embassy officer; I don't know where he was. The son arrived in the village 60 minutes too late to stop anything. The Embassy man turned up next morning. No blood samples were taken and stored at the hospital. He was sent home from the hospital in Udon on the say of his G/F. His G/F arranged everything on the quick. Only a few weeks previously he was helping me unload sacks of cement at my house. He was not ill then I can tell you. Unfortunately I was not in Thailand when he actually passed away. I'm not too unhappy about that 'cause I may well have put my own life at risk by demanding things were done right by him. There is much more to this story; another time perhaps!
  11. Yes indeed!! Take it slow! You can't get to know a woman after a night in bed together. No matter how wonderful she says you are. Or how loving you think she is. Spend a couple of weeks wooing her. Then get away on some fictitious errand. Employ a private detective to keep tabs and record everything she does. Keep in daily touch with both and learn her ways. If everything is to your liking come back are and sweep her up before someone else does. If the detective's report is not to your liking; well just move on. Sounds very sneaky I know, but it might just save you years of agony. Note: Don't make the same mistake as me and get her brother to act as private eye.
  12. Is that how many teachers there are in Thailand? Wow! An acorn grows into a big oak tree. Hopefuily!!
  13. In Isan it is rat poisoning or motorbike accidents. And unless the family make a big noise that's the end of it forever. No newspaper coverage; no statistic.
  14. Carry on the good work Sir. As I've often said forums are not only about debate but member's personal experiences.
  15. I read your post and I did say in the first line; and I quote I'm not disagreeing with you about your post and I like a lot of the copy. I'm simply putting forward a little anecdote. Actually I am very much informed about the 'full facts' of the case to which I was referring.