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Tofer

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About Tofer

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  • Birthday 04/28/1956
  1. That's completely normal in Koh Lanta / Krabi, even with a policeman monitoring the busy junctions near the schools. A youth no more than that age with 2 passengers rode out of a side road, unable to control the bike properly, and almost side swiped us had I not reacted instantly. Fortunately I've come to expect it... I don't see many posts this time from the casual characters who thought the baby on the drivers lap in a previous post was acceptable..
  2. It's 100k / month, and you don't have to spend it, you don't even have to bring it here just prove the income as I understand it, with an embassy declaration / certificate. It's just another option, as you say for those that can show the income. It doesn't mean it's BS, as many on here have alluded, just because it doesn't fit their profile. I agree the details are somewhat scant, and will need more information before considering it seriously. But anything that reduces the Immigration hustle for 5 years (4 visits) has got to be worth considering.
  3. From the 'full story' attached to the original headline post and the 'associated story' therein. Of course if you have the full official details please disclose them, I would happily stand corrected, to make an informed choice.
  4. You could have saved the batteries on your calculator and simply declare an income of 100,000THB...... No deposit required! Of course I appreciate some are not able to show such an income, but those that can would benefit immensely from not having to visit immigration for 5 years, with all the associated time and hassle. Particularly as online reporting is now available. So I'm guessing this visa only appears ludicrous to those that cannot show an income in excess of 100k. It's not mentioned, but I presume this would be a multi exit / entry visa, another benefit depending on the actual application cost of this visa, compared with the annual fee of 3,800/an for the same annual extension. A further benefit is a sense of security of residence for 5 years. Viewing it from this angle, what's not to like?
  5. I lived in Malaysia 2 years. I now now live in Thailand. What conclusions would you draw from that? Of you go then, enjoy... Please don't send me an invite!
  6. That's just the way it is I suppose.
  7. Absolutely right, a good upbringing is all children should expect, and our nephews have certainly been very fortunate in that respect, so should be able to make their own fortunes hopefully. Thanks, we've been very lucky in Lanta albeit quite late. I came to Krabi about 30 years ago to check out the islands but never saw Lanta, what a blow. Happily when we finally discovered the place prices were still very affordable, positively cheap compared to Phuket, and totally unspoilt. Fingers crossed it doesn't change too radically.
  8. Hats off to you for enduring and succeeding with that. It would be fantastic not to have to deal with immigration ever again and feel secure in your residence here, but I think it's a none starter for me.
  9. Thanks again for your advice. That had occurred to me also, but our Thai assets are fast overtaking our UK assets as appreciation is much better here. Koh Lanta is on a similar trajectory to that experienced in Phuket over the last 20 years, plus we are still developing our property here. If all goes according to plan I think our UK assets will pale into insignificance in the not too distant future. A nice dilemma to have, but still a dilemma! Our adopted Son is a good lad and continues his relationships / communication with his cousins in UK, so fingers crossed I suppose. When all said and done, I'll be ashes and they can all stand on their own 2 feet I suppose. Nobody ever gave me anything, except good manners, a conscience and a decent education, which is all any of us should really hope for.
  10. Well done Arkady, I am very jealous of your Thai status. Unfortunately I don't have any occupation here, and am unlikely to get one, at my age, other than on a volunteer basis perhaps helping out in the local schools with English. Out of interest do applicants still need to sing the national anthem?
  11. Now you've got me really confused - not difficult some may say! How can a foreigner become a joint owner of land if they are not allowed to own land? Did you do that on the strength of a simple pink ID?, or have you obtained full residency status?
  12. Thanks for the benefit of your experience, hopefully not personally. I agree a usufruct is definitely the way to go to protect your residency. I just wonder what would happen when I and my wife die and my wife's adopted Son (Nephew) takes the title and our will stipulates a quarter share between him and 3 British nephews.
  13. Thanks, that's very reassuring. I would however have no qualms about transferring the title into my wife's (our) adopted Son's name to be able to continue living there with a usufruct till my days end. It would just be nice to think our other 3 British nephews could share in the legacy as we have split our assets 4 ways in the UK will plus a few considerations around the rest of the family members. I hope to never be in that position, being blessed with a near perfect wife. I would truly hate to be single again at my age (61).
  14. Can you please clarify one point from your statement / advice. If a will is written to pass the proceeds of the sale of the property to a foreign husband, will that still apply / be enforceable if the property does not sell within the required 12 month time limit allowed for the sale before transfer of title to a Thai is necessary. In other words, can the Thai who is nominated for transfer of ownership be forced to sell the property and hand over the proceeds to the original foreign beneficiary of the will? Thanks.
  15. Mother films daughter and dog licking from same peanut butter jar

    There is meat, vegetables, rice and fruit served up on huge silver trays placed on a runner (long rug) in the middle, diners sit around the runner and lean in to grab a handful of food (also known as a mutton grab in the Middle East).The camel dish I had was adorned on top of the meat pile by the camels head, and the hooves were arranged around the edge of the tray. When I say meat pile it's no exaggeration, a tray about 3' in diameter piled about a foot high like a pyramid. I was invited to a Royal Oman Police departmental "Christmas" dinner, as I was the project architect on the site of their new headquarters buildings in Muscat, the shirties (beat cops), just out of the desert, had questionable dining habits, not pretty to say the least. These were guys who were, not long before, wiping their rear ends with stones in the desert and no water to wash hands, although they did allocate one hand for eating and the other for ablutions, or so they say! A colleague working on their staff housing reported that they were still using stones and then throwing them down the ceramic toilets, cracking most in the process. Also removing doors on western kitchen units to put mesh in front so as to keep their chickens in there.
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