Jump to content

Antonymous

Members
  • Content count

    184
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

260 Excellent

About Antonymous

  • Rank
    Antithetical Member
  • Birthday 01/14/1964

Recent Profile Visitors

385 profile views
  1. Antonymous

    Milk sell by dates.

    Faraday, even if you ignore the concern that IGF-1 from cow’s milk could increase normal blood IGF-1 levels and so increase the risk of certain cancers linked to IGF-1, you are apparently unaware that there are many small peptides and amino acids that are present in milk that potently stimulate hepatic IGF-1 expression and pituitary growth hormone release. In other words, drinking milk increases IGF-1 production from the liver which in turn leads to an increase in the levels present in the blood. According to Professor Jeffrey Holly, Professor of Clinical Sciences at the University of Bristol, his studies and those of others have consistently found that, of all the components of human diet, milk and dairy products have the greatest effects on IGF-1 levels. So it may not be the presence of IGF-1 in milk that matters but rather the impact of milk on stimulating human IGF-1 production within individuals who consume milk and dairy products. Whether cow’s milk ingestion increases IGF-1 levels in humans by bovine IGF-1 crossing the gut wall, or other components in milk initiating a rapid rise in human IGF-1 production from the liver, the net effect is the same; if you drink cow’s milk, you end up with higher levels of IGF-1 in your blood, which in turn are linked to various cancers. All the independent research proves that the earth is round. If you want to believe it is flat, even though there is no research proof to support your claim, that is up to you. But for the sake of your children, I hope that you will allow them to become educated on the subject.
  2. Antonymous

    Milk sell by dates.

    Sorry to say, but you are so wrong. Have you ever read any research papers on milk consumption or growth hormone? I'm not going to waste any more time arguing about this subject, because it is fruitless if people won't even begin to look at the evidence. This is a subject of the greatest importance to anyone with children in Thai schools, so I'll end with just a few quotations for those willing to open their eyes: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition published results of a 65-year follow-up study showing dairy consumption affects biological pathways associated with carcinogenesis. They found a diet rich in dairy products during childhood is associated with a greater risk of colorectal cancer in adulthood. High childhood total dairy intake was associated with a near-tripling in the risk of colorectal cancer compared with low intake, independent of meat, fruit, and vegetable intakes and socioeconomic indicators. Milk intake showed a similar association. (van der Pols JC, Bain C, Gunnell D, Smith GD, Frobisher C, Martin RM. Childhood dairy intake and adult cancer risk: 65-y follow-up of the Boyd Orr cohort. Am J Clin Nutr. 2007; 86(6):1722-1729.) “The research is clear. The consumption of cow’s milk and milk products is linked to increased levels of IGF-1, which in turn are linked to various cancers.” https://www.whitelies.org.uk/health-nutrition/insulin-growth-factor-1-igf-1 “Your diet influences the level of IGF-1 in your blood, according to the Physician’s Committee for Responsible Medicine (PRCM). A diet high in calories or animal protein increases your IGF-1 levels. Milk appears to raise IGF-1 as well. The PCRM explains that evidence from clinical data found that drinking three 8-ounce glasses of milk for 12 weeks causes a 10 percent increase in IGF-1 levels. The concern is that if milk raises IGF-1 levels, then it may lead to an increased risk for cancer.” https://www.livestrong.com/article/500398-which-types-of-milk-have-the-most-igf-1/ “When cow’s milk is fed to people, IGF-1 levels also increase. Studies funded by the dairy industry show a 10% increase in IGF-1 levels in adolescent girls from one pint daily and the same 10% increase for postmenopausal women from 3 servings per day of nonfat milk or 1% milk. IGF-1 is one of the most powerful promoters of cancer growth ever discovered for cancers of the breast, prostate, lung, and colon. Overstimulation of growth by IGF-1 leads to premature aging too—and reducing IGF-1 levels is “anti-aging.” https://www.drmcdougall.com/misc/2007nl/mar/dairy.htm Last word from Dr McDougall: “With a $206.5 million annual budget dedicated to confusing people and covering up the truth for the sake of profits, and with the current political climate, there is no hope of regulating the dairy industry—or more appropriately for such a hazardous substance, outlawing these cow products for human consumption.21 Fortunately, thinking people are freeing themselves and their families from sickness and obesity by learning that human nutritional needs are far removed from those of baby cows.”
  3. Antonymous

    Milk sell by dates.

    Thanks for that link. Interesting to note in the report the emphasis put on the importance of the school market for the Thai dairy industry - but not on the health of the children per se! I quote from the report: “In 2013, School Milk is a vital part of the Thai dairy market, so much so that it accounts for about 40% of the total liquid milk market. As a result, school milk days has been expanded from the 200 days school calendar to 230 feeding days, with an extra 30 days of milk for consumption during the holidays. The economic benefits and the support of the national development is less known. Without school milk to provide a stable platform by which to support the growth of the Thai dairy industry, the Thai dairy will definitely not have experienced such growth.” Conclusions “To provide a long-term market for Thai dairy farmers, the DPO initiated the school milk feeding program among children under 12 years old. The program introduces milk to the diet of Thai children and develops in them a lifelong milk-consumption habit. Nowadays, 40% of quantity of liquid milk are produced in Thailand for this program.”
  4. Antonymous

    Milk sell by dates.

    As with all scientific evidence and expert opinion, it is always up to us whether we take heed of it or not. Regarding milk I do take it seriously, but you don’t need to take my word on it. There’s been so much published information about the dangers of drinking milk. For example regarding cancer, according to Dr Samuel Epstein (Professor Emeritus of Environmental and Occupational Medicine at the School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago, and Chairman of the Cancer Prevention Coalition. He is an internationally recognized authority on the causes and prevention of cancer, and has published some 350 scientific articles and 15 books): “… About 20 percent of our milk is genetically engineered. Technically this is known as rBGH, the small r stands for recombinant, BGH, is bovine growth hormone… This [milk] contains very high levels of a natural growth factor known as IGF-1… IGF-1 stands for Insulin-like Growth Factor 1. So growth factor 1 is a natural growth factor and is responsible for normal growth but when you drink rBGH milk, you have very, very high levels of this natural growth factor. When you drink it, the IGF-1 survives digestion and is readily absorbed from your small intestine, into your blood. Increased levels of IGF-1 have been shown to increase risks of breast cancer and we have about 20 publications showing this; risk of colon cancer [shown] by about 10 publications; prostate cancer by about another 10 publications. And a further concern: increased levels of IGF-1 block natural defense mechanisms against early cancers, [mechanisms] known as ‘apoptosis.’”
  5. Antonymous

    Milk sell by dates.

    I think it is terribly sad that Thailand is encouraging children to consume milk. My mother was a senior nurse. She instructed us kids to avoid pasteurized cow’s milk and explained the dangers of drinking it. She was well ahead of her time and going against the powerful dairy industry campaign of “Drink a pint of milk a day” that was prevalent at the time in the UK. Today there is a wealth of evidence about the very serious possible harms of consuming pasteurized cow’s milk. If you’ve somehow missed this, just Google ‘milk is bad for you’ to find out for yourself. Here is a partial list: In observational studies both across countries and within single populations, higher dairy intake has been linked to increased risk of prostate cancer. Observational cohort studies have shown higher dairy intake is linked to higher ovarian cancer risk. Cow’s milk protein may play a role in triggering type 1 diabetes through a process called molecular mimicry. Across countries, populations that consume more dairy have higher rates of multiple sclerosis. In interventional animal experiments and human studies, dairy protein has been shown to increase IGF-1 (Insulin-like Growth Factor-1) levels. Increased levels of IGF-1 has now been implicated in several cancers. In interventional animal experiments and human experiments dairy protein has been shown to promote increased cholesterol levels (in the human studies and animal studies) and atherosclerosis (in the animal studies). The primary milk protein (casein) promotes cancer initiated by a carcinogen in experimental animal studies. D-galactose has been found to be pro-inflammatory and actually is given to create animal models of aging. Higher milk intake is linked to acne. Milk intake has been implicated in constipation and ear infections. Milk is perhaps the most common self-reported food allergen in the world. Much of the world’s population cannot adequately digest milk due to lactose intolerance (90% of Asians are lactose intolerant).
  6. Definitely, yes. Of course the vet recommended Hill's - you will have bought it from the vet, right?
  7. Antonymous

    Pattaya / THExpats / Health-Self-insured?

    I hope not too. But I have 1st class car insurance, plus personal accident insurance with Bangkok Insurance, plus Aetna/BUPA health insurance that should cover me if I do. What was your point?
  8. Antonymous

    Living in a quiet Issan village.

    You seem to want to ignore my posts and those of other very happy rural village dwellers. You seem to have an agenda or have made up your mind without having any experience. I fell in love with Thailand on my first visit and after that explored the length and breadth of the country. I particularly loved the 'freedom', the countryside scenery (never been a beach fan) and relaxed way of life. My business took me to Chiang Mai and there I settled, living in or near the city for my work. But I got out into the countryside as much as possible at weekends and now that I no longer work I've chosen to move out to a beautiful scenic, quiet and safe village. This is heaven for me and my wife. Having a home with all the conveniences in it that anyone could need, living in a quiet and peaceful place, being able to go for walks or bike rides in the most beautiful countryside and forests right on your doorstep, having a large garden to enjoy at leisure, having happy and friendly (very resourceful) neighbours, shopping for farm fresh vegetables in the local market at a fraction of the price in city supermarkets, eating big portions of delicious food at local restaurants for 30-35 baht a dish - these are my realities. I understand that these are things that don't appeal to some folk and that's fine, but don't knock other people who are living their dream. And by the way, not everyone who lives in the countryside is a farmer!
  9. Antonymous

    Pattaya / THExpats / Health-Self-insured?

    I have health insurance (Aetna/BUPA Thailand) but I have never made a claim on it (15+ years). Yet my premiums increase drastically every year and that pisses me off. I maintain a healthy diet and lifestyle to ‘self insure’ that I never need to see a doctor or take any medication. To me, taking care of yourself is the ultimate self insurance. Yet I see so many expats who abuse their bodies. They all get sick and blame their cancer/heart problems/high blood pressure, etc on getting old. They use the health insurance business as their personal bank, which they willfully rob. The reasons that health insurance premiums are so high and continue to increase well above the rate of inflation year on year are basically twofold: 1. Those with insurance cover tend to USE and abuse their insurance because they feel able to take more risks with their health and/or go for unnecessary treatments to get ‘value-for-money’ from their premium payments. I bet you know people who deliberately use up or exceed the cost of their insurance premiums each year as a matter of course, as if it is their right. 2. Doctors and hospitals tend to PRESCRIBE more medication and services to those who are insured, because they are in business to make money. If you want to have both a healthier population and healthcare at affordable prices, then you have to scrap health insurance cover for avoidable conditions. That’s most conditions – a statement only controversial because pharmaceutical businesses dispute it and ignorant or willful individuals won’t accept it. Accidental injuries and trauma care and a well-defined limited number of non-avoidable conditions could still be insured against. People would either have to pay for their own medical care, or have to adjust their diet and lifestyle to make healthier choices, thereby eventually living their lives without any pharmaceutical drugs or the need for hospital services - as I do now. Those who could afford to get sick and couldn’t care less, would be free to continue to indulge themselves in non-healthy options. There would be no law against it. It would be their choice and when they do inevitably fall ill, the costs of their care would not become a burden on everyone else who made healthier choices, as is the case with the prevailing insurance system. So to answer the OP, self insurance is definitely an option to consider for those who understand what self insurance actually implies and take steps to stay healthy accordingly. I would highly recommend that you take out the best personal accident insurance you can afford however. We all know how prevalent accidents are in Thailand and they can happen to anyone anytime. Because people don’t willingly incur accidents in order to abuse their insurance, premiums are much lower than health insurance and are affordable.
  10. Oh puleeease some of the posters on this thread, stop with the idiotic comments about rural living in Thailand. I really sympathise with Colin’s predicament, both his physical condition and now his mental torture due to fears for his safety. But his problems are uniquely his and not a reflection on village life as such. Nasty people, drug and alcohol addicts, psychopaths and yes even murderers, can be found in villages, towns and cities everywhere. I would argue that there’s a far greater concentration of them - and therefore a greater chance to be affected by them personally - in major conurbations than in rural villages, but that’s not my point. We, all of us expats here in Thailand, have a choice about where we live, or at least SHOULD be able to choose for ourselves. I emigrated to Thailand to make it MY home, to suit MY lifestyle, not to join someone else’s family, to live someone else’s lifestyle and to feed someone else’s needs. Most problems I see – all those people on TV complaining about the in-laws and relatives, the antics of neighbours and other people in the vicinity, or about the lack of facilities in your area and so on – emanate from those living in a place that is obviously unsuited to their needs and desires that was chosen FOR them by their Thai partner. For goodness sake, choose your own home and live where you want. Find a Thai partner who shares your tastes. Always rent and be prepared to move, at least until you are certain that you have found your niche, only then maybe contemplate buying. There's a problem in your neighbourhood? Move. At different ages and stages of our lives we tend to have different needs and desires. Nobody can say that living in the country or the town is better, or that a condo is a better choice than a house, or that renting is better than buying. All may be perfectly suitable to different personalities at different times. I’ve lived in six different properties around Chiang Mai over nearly 30 years. My work kept me in or close to Chiang Mai city for most of that time and it suited me fine, though I was so glad to have rented and to be able to move house easily when it suited. Now we live in a house that we purchased in a traditional village in rural Chiang Mai that is (as it seems to be a measure that TV members can relate to) more than 25kms from the nearest 7-11. It is perfect, beautiful, quiet and safe. Our neighbours are lovely people. There are villages like this all over. I chose this place above all other choices (I have the means to live anywhere) because it suits me perfectly. My Thai partner, who has no relatives or work interests anywhere near here, shares my tastes and she loves it here as much as I do. Point is that we did our research before moving and selected carefully. You can too. Colin, this isn’t directed at you and I understand and sympathise with your limitations. It is directed at those making snide and nasty remarks about the choice of ‘village living’.
  11. Well, she ain't my GF any more! I stick by my observation. Fact is that if a person has no knowledge of what a symbol actually symbolises, or of what the person in an image actually did - and that applies to many even university educated Thais - they cannot be accused of meaning offense.
  12. Ha ha, yes. I believe the reason truck drivers love to have his image on their mudflaps is because Serpico symbolises protection from corrupt police.
  13. Some years ago I had a university educated Thai GF sitting in the passenger seat of my car driving through Chiang Mai. Emblazoned on the back window of the pick-up truck we were following was an image of Che Guevara. Unprompted she exclaimed with a chuckle: "Look at that; I bet the driver doesn't even know who it is!" I waited a moment before asking her if SHE knew who it was. "Hitler" came her reply. After pointing out that it wasn't, she backtracked and said: "No, no, sorry, it's that guy who smokes alot of ganga..." She meant Bob Marley. Fact is, like it or not, images of famous people in history become icons of fashion, without there being any understanding of who they were or what they represented. No offense is meant by Thai people who display them.
  14. Antonymous

    Living in a quiet Issan village.

    Yes I would agree with you in that case. Sorry if my aside came across as a bit mean. It was really directed at the many 'newbies' who go straight off to the partner's village to set up a new home and life without first getting to know them and how things work. While there may be some benefits, there are usually many more drawbacks.
  15. Antonymous

    Living in a quiet Issan village.

    Make friends with the village soi dogs too! It is really easy. Be friendly towards them, take a few biscuits in your pocket when you go out. They'll drop their aggressive response when you drop yours!
×