bgood

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  1. Thanks for your reply swissie but I'm not sure I fully understand it. I suggested Inner post here. She has cleaned and cooked for me and I have no reluctance to recommend her as a carer. Last year an elderly friend of mine was in desperate need of carer. I did the job myself because I could not find a reliable, thrustworthy carer to look after him. I cleaned him and his soiled bed. I fed him, took him to doctors and managed his finances. I wish I had found someone like Inner at the time to help me. That friend is now in a full care facility in Jomtien and I'm very happy with the way they are looking after him. Some elderly people want to stay in their own home but need short or long term assistance to do so. Inner's request was genuine
  2. Thanks for the informativative post, Artisi. I'm trying to be very careful with my reply as I don't want to appear to be flaming. Unfortunately, I find your final sentence a little annoying. In my case, I don't qualify currently under the assets/income test for a pension in Oz but I would like to think that should this situation change that Oz would provide a safty-net for me. I retired to Thailand at the age of 45 but left most of my assessets there and continued to pay high taxes. A few years ago I changed my status to non resident to reduce the tax. I continue to pay 10% flat on my income there. I assume I'd be classifed as a 'former resident'. I don't remember ever making a decision to leave Oz 'for good' but I now think of Thailand as home. I received a university education at the Oz tax payers expense and I was supported by the Australian Council to estabilish my business in Oz. I'm very grateful for both. I spent many years working in Oz and paid a lot in tax. I hope that I never find myself in a situation where I need to ask but I do 'now feel they owe me a pension'(should I need it). Please don't take this as an attack, Artisi. Because I choose to live in Thailand with my Thai wife and dual citizenship son, I don't see why I should be denied a safty-net income from Oz after all the tax I paid there.
  3. ^ I have sent you a PM with the details you requested, samuibeachcomber. Most of my income is from term investment accounts in an Australian bank. At the moment I'm receiving 8.2% on these. If you inform the bank that you are non resident Australian, they take a withholding tax of 10% from any interest payments and no further tax is payable. I also hold shares in companies listed on the ASX whose dividends are fully franked and therefore I am not required to submit a tax return each year (unless I sell shares and have to pay capital gains tax).
  4. roskruge, I’m sorry if my comment caused offence. It was meant ‘tongue in cheek’ and aimed at a possible lack of compassion shown by some public servants and government officials in Oz. I’m sure that the dozens of people you met in Oz when you were their (sic) are truly deserving of our sympathy.
  5. They’d probably have you arrested as a vagrant and throw you in jail! Free rent, free food, free medical cover – not so bad!
  6. I'd be pleased if that happened, Chris, but I fear that with an aging population of baby boomers, it would be very difficult for any Govt to shift to any great extent.
  7. Quote 'david96' "What was the visa your son was travelling on? Medicare eligibility in Australia depends on the current visa the applicant holds." David My son is an Australian citizen, as I am. We don't require visas to enter Oz. My Thai wife does and has only ever been to Oz on tourist visas. At the Medicare office there were no questions about visas, only questions about our resident status (and proof there of).
  8. Thanks oziboy, an informative post. I had a similar experience a few years back when I went to a medicare office. I wanted to inquire about putting my son onto my card so that he had health coverage while in Australia. The reaction from the rep I spoke to came as a shock. She told me I would need to provide all sorts on evidence that I and my son were resident in Oz. These included evidence of sale of any family owned property in Thailand, cancelation of any lease agreements, cancelation of all bank accounts in Thailand, and evidence of a property ownership or rental agreement in Oz. There were many more requirements but I can't recall them all. When we travel to Oz now I take out family travel insurance.
  9. I'm sorry I can't help you on the details of your situation, Voiceover. I came here to piss it up against the wall after two bitter divorces. I was luky enough to meet a lady, 19 years my junior who sorted me out. We had a son and they are now my life. I agree with you - 'I now wouldn't change my situation for all the money in the world, not even the Australian Aged Pension!' Your situation certainly doesn't 'sound so dumb' to me. Good luck and I hope the members here can be of more assistance than me.
  10. Thanks for the link, david96. I'm married (TW) with a 7y/o son (Oz citizen). If I'm reading the info. on that link correctly: I could have an income of up to A$ 6,000 p/a or assets of up to A$ 357,500 and receive the full AP. I could earn less than A$ 60,000 p/a or have assets less than A$ 960,500 and receive part AP. I would need to return to Oz and become a resident. My wife would probably need to sell our family house, and the house her family live in here in Thailand, for us to prove residency in Oz. While it is good to know that the 'safety net' is there if things go tits-up here, the above does not sound attractive, especially when you consider the cost of living in Oz compared to that of Thailand.
  11. I had always assumed that the Australian OAP was 'means tested'. Is this the case and if so, at what income level does it cut off? I retired to Thailand in 1997 at the age of 45. My income is from investments in Australia. On the advice of my accountant, I declared myself 'non-resident' in Australia and now pay 10% flat tax on earnings there. That is a lot less than I was paying. Should I live to the age of 65, (highly unlikly with my lifestyle), how poor will I need to be to receive an old age pension or part there of?