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  1. Thailand seizes $21 million in assets from dead founder of dark net marketplace AlphaBay BY REUTERS Image supplied BANGKOK (Reuters) – Thai police have seized nearly $21 million worth of assets, from cars to cryptocurrency, belonging to the late founder of dark web marketplace AlphaBay, who died in a Bangkok jail this month, they said on Monday. Alexandre Cazes, a 25-year-old Canadian citizen, was arrested in Thailand on July 5 at the request of the United States. Thai police on Monday confirmed he was the administrator of AlphaBay, an online site devoted to the sale of illicit goods, ranging from computer hacking tools to drugs and weapons. AlphaBay was widely considered the biggest online black market for drugs, estimated to host daily transactions totaling hundreds of thousands of dollars. Cazes was found dead in his cell at the Narcotics Suppression Bureau in Bangkok on July 12 before he was due to be extradited to the United States, deputy national police chief Chalermkiat Sriworakan said. Full story: http://tech.thaivisa.com/thailand-seizes-21-million-assets-dead-founder-dark-net-marketplace-alphabay/23146/ -- © Copyright Thai Tech 2017-07-25
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    UK government to discuss Brexit implementation period later this year - minister FILE PHOTO: Britain's Secretary of State for Business, Greg Clark, arrives in Downing Street for a cabinet meeting, in central London, Britain July 18, 2017. REUTERS/Toby Melville/File Photo BIRMINGHAM, England (Reuters) - Britain's business minister said the government will discuss later this year how a transitional period after Brexit might work, a key demand for businesses worried about a cliff-edge exit at the end of two-year talks in March 2019. Full story: https://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/994047-uk-government-to-discuss-brexit-implementation-period-later-this-year-minister/
  3. UK government to discuss Brexit implementation period later this year - minister FILE PHOTO: Britain's Secretary of State for Business, Greg Clark, arrives in Downing Street for a cabinet meeting, in central London, Britain July 18, 2017. REUTERS/Toby Melville/File Photo BIRMINGHAM, England (Reuters) - Britain's business minister said the government will discuss later this year how a transitional period after Brexit might work, a key demand for businesses worried about a cliff-edge exit at the end of two-year talks in March 2019. Many companies have urged the government to push the European Union to agree a clear and lengthy transitional arrangement to help them make investment decisions and continue the unfettered flow of British exports to the continent. When asked when the government would set out what kind of transitional arrangement it would be seeking, Greg Clark said: "During the autumn ... and as the negotiations move forward, we hope from their initial discussion, then that's the time to say more about that," he said during an event in Birmingham. (Reporting by William James; writing by Costas Pitas in London; editing by Kate Holton) -- © Copyright Reuters 2017-07-25
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    Chinese jets intercept U.S. surveillance plane - U.S. officials By Idrees Ali FILE PHOTO: A U.S. Navy EP-3E Aries signals reconnaissance aircraft, escorted by an EA-18G Growler electronic warfare aircraft, performs a flyby over aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman in the Arabian Gulf April 24, 2016. U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Bobby J Siens/Handout/File Photo via REUTERS WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Two Chinese fighter jets intercepted a U.S. Navy surveillance plane over the East China Sea at the weekend, with one jet coming within about 300 feet (91 meters) of the American aircraft, U.S. officials said on Monday. Full story: https://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/994046-chinese-jets-intercept-us-surveillance-plane-us-officials/
  5. Chinese jets intercept U.S. surveillance plane - U.S. officials By Idrees Ali FILE PHOTO: A U.S. Navy EP-3E Aries signals reconnaissance aircraft, escorted by an EA-18G Growler electronic warfare aircraft, performs a flyby over aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman in the Arabian Gulf April 24, 2016. U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Bobby J Siens/Handout/File Photo via REUTERS WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Two Chinese fighter jets intercepted a U.S. Navy surveillance plane over the East China Sea at the weekend, with one jet coming within about 300 feet (91 meters) of the American aircraft, U.S. officials said on Monday. The officials, speaking on condition of anonymity, said initial reports showed one of the Chinese J-10 aircraft came close enough to the U.S. EP-3 plane on Sunday to cause the American aircraft to change direction. One of the officials said the Chinese jet was armed and that the interception happened 80 nautical miles (148 km) from the Chinese city of Qingdao. The Pentagon said that the encounter between the aircraft was unsafe, but added that the vast majority of interactions were safe. Incidents such as Sunday's intercept are relatively common. In May, two Chinese SU-30 aircraft intercepted a U.S. aircraft designed to detect radiation while it was flying in international air space over the East China Sea. China closely monitors any U.S. military activity around its coastline. In 2001, an intercept of a U.S. spy plane by a Chinese fighter jet resulted in a collision that killed the Chinese pilot and forced the American plane to make an emergency landing at a base on Hainan. The 24 U.S. air crew members were held for 11 days until Washington apologized for the incident. That encounter soured U.S.-Chinese relations in the early days of President George W. Bush's first term in office. Separately, the Pentagon said the U.S. military would soon carry out another test of it's Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) system. "These tests are done as a routine measure to ensure that the system is ready and... they are scheduled well in advance of any other real world geopolitical events going on," Pentagon spokesman Captain Jeff Davis told reporters. The director of the Missile Defense Agency, Lieutenant General Sam Greaves, said in a statement that a test would be carried out at the Pacific Spaceport Complex in Alaska. Last month the United States shot down a simulated, incoming intermediate-range ballistic missile similar to the ones being developed by countries like North Korea, in a test of the nation's THAAD missile defenses. The United States deployed THAAD to South Korea this year to guard against North Korea's shorter-range missiles. That has drawn fierce criticism from China, which says the system's powerful radar can probe deep into its territory. (Reporting by Idrees Ali; Editing by Grant McCool and Andrew Hay) -- © Copyright Reuters 2017-07-25
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    Polish president halts justice reforms after days of protests By Agnieszka Barteczko and Pawel Florkiewicz Poland's President Andrzej Duda speaks during his media announcement about Supreme Court legislation at Presidential Palace in Warsaw, Poland, July 24, 2017. REUTERS/Kacper Pempel WARSAW (Reuters) - Polish President Andrzej Duda unexpectedly announced on Monday he would veto two of three judicial reform bills passed by parliament that have triggered nationwide protests and raised EU and U.S. concerns about a politicisation of the courts. Full story: https://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/994045-polish-president-halts-justice-reforms-after-days-of-protests/
  7. Polish president halts justice reforms after days of protests By Agnieszka Barteczko and Pawel Florkiewicz Poland's President Andrzej Duda speaks during his media announcement about Supreme Court legislation at Presidential Palace in Warsaw, Poland, July 24, 2017. REUTERS/Kacper Pempel WARSAW (Reuters) - Polish President Andrzej Duda unexpectedly announced on Monday he would veto two of three judicial reform bills passed by parliament that have triggered nationwide protests and raised EU and U.S. concerns about a politicisation of the courts. Duda, an ally of the ruling right-wing, eurosceptic Law and Justice (PiS) party, said while he agreed with the government on the need for an overhaul of the judiciary, the proposed measures were not in line with the constitution. Prime Minister Beata Szydlo, clearly disappointed, said her government would not "yield to pressure" to drop the reforms but did not say how it would now proceed. PiS lacks a big enough parliamentary majority to overturn Duda's veto. "I use the right of veto because (the proposals) require changes to ensure they conform with the constitution," Duda said in a televised address to the nation, adding that he would shortly present his own proposals. His action appeared to catch the government off guard, while drawing only a cautious response from Brussels. PiS leader Jaroslaw Kaczynski, Poland's most powerful politician though without a government post, made no public comment on the veto. The overhaul of the judiciary, coupled with a drive by PiS to expand its powers in other areas, including control of media, has provoked a crisis in relations with the European Union and sparked one of the biggest political conflicts since Poland overthrew communism in 1989. Many Poles view the judiciary as corrupt and dominated by communist-era ways of thinking, while others see the government's reform efforts as a power grab that will undermine Polish democracy. For days, tens of thousands of protesters have held candlelit vigils in cities including Warsaw, Krakow and Poznan, demanding that Duda veto the reforms. Protests continued on Monday outside the PiS headquarters and Duda's office in Warsaw. "A FAIR POLAND" In her own televised national address on Monday evening, Szydlo said: "We all want to live in a fair Poland, this is why the reform of the courts is needed... Today's veto by the president has slowed down work on the reform." The government would not "yield to pressure from the street and from abroad", she added. Under the vetoed reforms, all current Supreme Court judges would have been immediately removed except those approved by the justice minister, who is also the prosecutor general. They would also have given parliament the right to name most of the members of the National Council of the Judiciary, which would nominate future candidates for the president to appoint to the Supreme Court. "Reform in this form will not increase the sense of security and justice ... Change has to be made in a way that doesn't separate society and state," Duda said in announcing his veto. He later held talks with Szydlo and the speakers of the two houses of parliament. The opposition and most legal experts say the changes would violate the Polish constitution. The government says the courts currently serve only the "elites" and rejects suggestions that Poland is heading towards authoritarian rule. The European Commission last Wednesday gave Poland a week to shelve the reforms, which Brussels says would put courts under direct government control. On Monday it reserved judgment on Duda's move pending a discussion at its next meeting, on Wednesday. But Germany's foreign office minister Michael Roth welcomed the veto and said he hoped Warsaw would completely ditch the reforms. Polish opposition groups urged Duda also to reject a third bill which gives the justice minister the right to dismiss the heads of lower courts. The president signalled that he would approve this law. The government would need a three-fifths parliamentary majority with at least half of all legislators present to overturn Duda's veto - something PiS and its coalition partners are unlikely to be able to muster. The state news agency PAP quoted the speaker of the upper house, the Senate, as saying there might be an additional sitting of parliament next week. Anna Materska, a political scientist at the University of Warsaw, said Duda's decision to distance himself from a flagship PiS policy after previously appearing closely aligned to the party could mark a political watershed. "What happened required courage, but the president was backed against the wall and had no other option. This is a key moment in the events of the latest months, maybe even years." Duda, 45, won the presidency in 2015 with the firm backing of Kaczynski, months before PiS also swept back to power in a parliamentary election on pledges to help poorer Poles and to protect national interests more vigorously in the EU and beyond. Last week Poland's latest bout of political turbulence helped to push its currency, the zloty <EURPLN=>, to three-month lows against the euro. Foreign investors welcomed Duda's veto on Monday by pushing the zloty up about 0.5 percent. [EMRG/FRX] (Reporting by Marcin Goclowski, Pawel Sobczak, Anna Koper and Anna Wlodarczak-Semczuk; Editing by Gareth Jones and Mark Trevelyan) -- © Copyright Reuters 2017-07-25
  8. THAILAND LIVE

    Britain seeking certainty with U.S. as it Brexits - UK's Fox Britain's International Trade Secretary Liam Fox speaks during an interview with Reuters at the World Trade Organization (WTO) in Geneva, Switzerland, July 20, 2017. REUTERS/Pierre Albouy WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Britain wants to ensure business relations with the United States are not disrupted and will seek negotiations on an "ambitious" trade agreement with the United States, UK trade secretary, Liam Fox, told Trump administration officials at the launch of discussions on Monday on post-Brexit planning. Full story: https://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/994044-britain-seeking-certainty-with-us-as-it-brexits-uks-fox/
  9. Britain seeking certainty with U.S. as it Brexits - UK's Fox Britain's International Trade Secretary Liam Fox speaks during an interview with Reuters at the World Trade Organization (WTO) in Geneva, Switzerland, July 20, 2017. REUTERS/Pierre Albouy WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Britain wants to ensure business relations with the United States are not disrupted and will seek negotiations on an "ambitious" trade agreement with the United States, UK trade secretary, Liam Fox, told Trump administration officials at the launch of discussions on Monday on post-Brexit planning. Fox and his U.S. counterpart, Robert Lighthizer, jointly chaired the first meeting of a U.S.-UK trade and investment working group, which will start work on a bilateral trade agreement between the countries after Brexit. Britain is not free to enter into new trade deals until it has left the EU in 2019. It has indicated, however, that it wants to get legal documents in place to ensure that such things as flights and data flows between the countries are not interrupted. "The immediate priority is to give businesses on both sides of the Atlantic certainty and confidence," Fox told the working group in opening remarks made available to the press. "Early discussions will focus on providing commercial continuity for US and UK businesses as the UK leaves the EU," he added. On Tuesday, as part of Britain's Brexit transition campaign, Fox is due to address U.S. lawmakers on Capitol Hill and launch a report detailing British trade and investment with 435 congressional districts in the United States. Trade between the United States and Britain is about $200 billion annually. "We have begun to look at our continuity agreements to maintain as open and flexible relationship as we can," Fox told the American Enterprise Institute think tank earlier on Monday. "We're looking at bilateral ways, while we're still members of the European Union, to achieve trade liberalization on a number of fronts on science and technology, and we are looking to scope out the future free trade agreement with no preconceptions attached to that," he added. Fox defended Britain's decision to leave the bloc and said those still hoping to change the 2015 British referendum result, which supported Brexit, "are dreaming." U.S. President Donald Trump has said his administration would work hard to get a quick bilateral trade deal done. Trade was a major issue during the Brexit campaign when former U.S. President Barack Obama said Britain would have to go "to the back of the queue" for a deal if it voted to leave the EU. (Reporting by Lesley Wroughton; Editing by Tom Brown, Bernard Orr) -- © Copyright Reuters 2017-07-25
  10. THAILAND LIVE

    Trump son-in-law details contacts with Russians, denies collusion By Jeff Mason and Patricia Zengerle After speaking to lawmakers on Captiol Hill about his contacts with Russia, President Trump's son-in-law Jared Kushner makes a statement from the White House saying, "All of my actions were proper.". WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Jared Kushner, President Donald Trump's son-in-law and a senior White House adviser, told Senate investigators on Monday he had met with Russian officials four times last year but said he did not collude with Moscow to influence the 2016 U.S. election. Full story: https://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/994043-trump-son-in-law-details-contacts-with-russians-denies-collusion/
  11. Trump son-in-law details contacts with Russians, denies collusion By Jeff Mason and Patricia Zengerle After speaking to lawmakers on Captiol Hill about his contacts with Russia, President Trump's son-in-law Jared Kushner makes a statement from the White House saying, "All of my actions were proper.". WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Jared Kushner, President Donald Trump's son-in-law and a senior White House adviser, told Senate investigators on Monday he had met with Russian officials four times last year but said he did not collude with Moscow to influence the 2016 U.S. election. A businessman like Trump, Kushner portrayed himself as new to politics when he became a top adviser to Trump's campaign. Frantic fielding of phone calls and emails made his recollections of some meetings somewhat hazy, he said. Kushner, who met behind closed doors with Senate Intelligence Committee staff, made the remarks in a written statement that he issued before the meeting and that gave the fullest account to date of his contacts with Russian officials. "I did not collude, nor know of anyone else in the campaign who colluded, with any foreign government," he wrote. "I had no improper contacts. I have not relied on Russian funds to finance my business activities in the private sector." U.S. intelligence agencies have determined that Russia, under President Vladimir Putin, engaged in a campaign of hacking and propaganda to try to tilt the November election in Trump's favor. Russia denies the allegations and Trump has denied his campaign colluded with Moscow. Kushner, who is married to Trump's daughter Ivanka Trump, met committee staff for about two hours on Capitol Hill and then returned to the White House where he made a statement to reporters outside but did not take questions. "The record and documents I have voluntarily provided will show that all of my actions were proper and occurred in the normal course of events of a very unique campaign," Kushner said. Trump prevailed over his Democratic rival Hillary Clinton in November 2016 because he ran a "smarter campaign" and to suggest otherwise "ridicules those who voted for him,” he said. Trump, who has called the Russia probes politically motivated, lashed out at the investigations in Twitter messages on Monday. The Senate Intelligence Committee is one of several congressional panels investigating the Russia matter, along with a criminal probe led by special counsel Robert Mueller. Kushner arrived on Capitol Hill with prominent white-collar defense lawyer Abbe Lowell. Two sources with knowledge of what Kushner told the Senate staff said the session was pleasant and conversational and that there may be another interview. Kushner did not initially disclose any meetings with Russians on forms he filed to get a government security clearance for his work in the White House. He has since revised those forms several times. According to the sources, Kushner told the investigators that his lawyers and staff had not handled his security clearance form properly but they informed the FBI immediately when they realized it had been sent before it was complete, and then submitted a complete version. He said in his written statement that the initial form omitted not just Russian contacts but all foreign contacts. MEETING WITH RUSSIAN AMBASSADOR Kushner said he first met Russian Ambassador Sergei Kislyak in Washington in April 2016 and shook hands. Reuters reported that there were at least 18 phone calls, text massages and emails between Trump campaign associates and Kremlin-linked individuals between April and November 2016, according to current and former officials. Among those 18 contacts were six calls between Trump associates and Kislyak. Two of the sources identified Kushner as involved in at least two of those calls with Kislyak. The six calls with Kislyak also included Michael Flynn, Trump's former national security adviser, those sources said. Kushner said he did not recall phone calls with Kislyak between April and November 2016, had found no evidence of the calls in phone records and was skeptical they took place. Kushner was expected to face questions about reports he tried to set up a secret back channel to Moscow. He said that in a Dec. 1 meeting with Kislyak, the Russian ambassador asked if there was a secure line in Trump's transition office to facilitate a discussion with Russian generals about Syria, and Kushner replied there was not. Kushner said he asked if there was an existing communications channel at the Russian Embassy that could be used, but Kislyak said that was not possible and they agreed to follow up after the inauguration. "Nothing else occurred. I did not suggest a 'secret back channel,'" Kushner said. Kushner said he met on Dec. 13, with Sergei Gorkov, the head of Russian state-owned Vnesheconombank, because of Kislyak's insistence and because the Russian had a "direct relationship" with Putin. "He introduced himself and gave me two gifts - one was a piece of art from Nvgorod, the village where my grandparents were from in Belarus, and the other was a bag of dirt from that same village," Kushner said. He said that neither sanctions imposed by Democratic former President Barack Obama's administration nor Kushner's business activities were discussed. Vneshekonombank has been subjected to U.S. economic sanctions since mid-2014 over Russia's annexation of Crimea from Ukraine. Relations between the United States and Russia deteriorated under Obama and Trump has said he wants to improve ties with Moscow, at times expressing admiration for Putin. 'NEED EXCUSE' TO LEAVE MEETING Lawmakers have said they want to hear about a June 2016 meeting involving Russian lawyer Natalia Veselnitskaya and Trump's eldest son, Donald Trump Jr. The younger Trump has released emails that showed he welcomed the prospect of receiving damaging information from the Russian government about Clinton. Kushner and former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort were also at the meeting but Kushner described it as a waste of time and said there was no discussion about the campaign during the time he was there. "I actually emailed an assistant from the meeting after I had been there for ten or so minutes and wrote 'Can u pls call me on my cell? Need excuse to get out of meeting.'" Kushner is also scheduled to address the House intelligence panel on Tuesday. Jonathan Turley, a professor at George Washington University law school, said Kushner's statement sought to make the best of a bad situation. "At best, these meetings make Kushner and others look like chumps," Turley said. "They may be forced to argue they were ham-handed chumps." (Reporting by Jeff Mason and Patricia Zengerle; additional reporting by Susan Heavey, Eric Walsh, Steve Holland, Warren Strobel and Doina Chiacu in Washington and Ned Parker and Karen Freifeld in New York; Writing by Jeff Mason, Caren Bohan; Editing by Frances Kerry and Grant McCool) -- © Copyright Reuters 2017-07-25
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    Trump pleads with U.S. Republicans to roll back Obamacare By Ayesha Rascoe and Amanda Becker U.S. President Donald Trump speaks to departing White House interns after posing for a photograph with them in the East Room of the White House in Washington, U.S., July 24, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Donald Trump made a last-ditch plea to U.S. Senate Republicans on Monday to "do the right thing" and fulfill seven years of campaign promises to repeal and replace former President Barack Obama's signature healthcare law. Full story: https://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/994042-trump-pleads-with-us-republicans-to-roll-back-obamacare/
  13. Trump pleads with U.S. Republicans to roll back Obamacare By Ayesha Rascoe and Amanda Becker U.S. President Donald Trump speaks to departing White House interns after posing for a photograph with them in the East Room of the White House in Washington, U.S., July 24, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Donald Trump made a last-ditch plea to U.S. Senate Republicans on Monday to "do the right thing" and fulfill seven years of campaign promises to repeal and replace former President Barack Obama's signature healthcare law. The Senate will vote on Tuesday on whether to open debate on an overhaul of the law, with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell promising an open amendment process and a "robust" debate. "To every member of the Senate I say this: The American people have waited long enough. There's been enough talk, and no action. Now is the time for action," Trump said on Monday at the White House. Standing in front of families who he said had been hurt by the law popularly known as Obamacare, Trump said, "So far, Senate Republicans have not done their job in ending the Obamacare nightmare." Even as it remained unclear on Monday whether McConnell had enough votes in the Senate to open debate, he said the vote would take place regardless. "I know many of us have waited years for this moment to finally arrive. And, at long last, it finally has. I would urge every colleague to join me," McConnell said. One Republican senator who will likely miss the vote is John McCain, who has been diagnosed with brain cancer and is at home in Arizona weighing treatment options. While some in the Senate leadership had expressed hope that McCain might return to support moving forward on the healthcare bill, Senator Orrin Hatch on Monday said he did not expect McCain to be present for the vote. Moderate Senator Susan Collins, who has vocally opposed McConnell's efforts so far, said on Monday she would vote "no" on a motion to proceed. Republicans have been under heavy political pressure to make good on their longstanding campaign promises to gut the 2010 law, which they view as a government intrusion in the healthcare market. But the party is deeply divided between moderates concerned the Senate bill would eliminate insurance for millions of low-income Americans and conservatives who want to see even deeper cuts to the Obamacare legislation. Senate Republicans have been unable to reach consensus on an approach, with McConnell failing to secure enough votes for either a repeal and replacement of Obamacare or a straight repeal. Republicans hold a 52-48 majority in the 100-member Senate. With Democrats united in opposition, McConnell can only afford to lose two Republican votes. 'FORGOTTEN VICTIMS' "The question for every senator, Democrat or Republican, is whether they will side with Obamacare’s architects, which have been so destructive to our country, or its forgotten victims?" Trump said. While Trump has repeatedly called on Republicans to repeal and replace Obamacare, he has shown little interest in the policy specifics. Trump last week initially suggested he was fine with letting Obamacare collapse, then urged Republican senators to hash out a deal. His remarks on Monday were among the lengthiest statements he has made regarding healthcare. "Obamacare is death. That's the one that's death," Trump said. "And besides that, it's failing so you won't have it anyway." McConnell will ask senators whether to begin debate on the healthcare bill passed in May by the House of Representatives. If that procedural vote succeeds, the House bill would then be open for amendment on the Senate floor. The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office has estimated the Senate's replacement bill could lead to as many as 22 million fewer Americans being insured. A plan to repeal Obamacare without replacing it could cost 32 million Americans their health insurance by 2026, CBO estimated. At the same time, premiums on individual insurance plans would rise 25 percent next year and double by 2026 if Obamacare is repealed, CBO said. Uncertainty over the future of healthcare has left health insurance companies and U.S. states as well as hospitals and doctors unclear about future funding and coverage. Public opinion polls also show Americans worried about potential changes to the healthcare system. (Writing by John Whitesides and James Oliphant; Additional reporting by Yasmeen Abutaleb, Richard Cowan, Susan Cornwell, Susan Heavey and Doina Chiacu; Editing by Mary Milliken and Cynthia Osterman) -- © Copyright Reuters 2017-07-25
  14. THAILAND LIVE

    Israel to replace metal detectors in Jerusalem with less obtrusive surveillance Israeli security forces remove metal detectors which were recently installed at an entrance to the compound known to Muslims as Noble Sanctuary and to Jews as Temple Mount in Jerusalem's Old City July 25, 2017. REUTERS/Ammar Awad JERUSALEM (Reuters) - Israel on Tuesday decided to remove metal detectors it had placed at the entrance to a holy site in Jerusalem's Old City with other, less obtrusive surveillance means, a cabinet statement said. Full story: https://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/994041-israel-to-replace-metal-detectors-in-jerusalem-with-less-obtrusive-surveillance/
  15. Israel to replace metal detectors in Jerusalem with less obtrusive surveillance Israeli security forces remove metal detectors which were recently installed at an entrance to the compound known to Muslims as Noble Sanctuary and to Jews as Temple Mount in Jerusalem's Old City July 25, 2017. REUTERS/Ammar Awad JERUSALEM (Reuters) - Israel on Tuesday decided to remove metal detectors it had placed at the entrance to a holy site in Jerusalem's Old City with other, less obtrusive surveillance means, a cabinet statement said. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's cabinet voted to remove the metal detector gates after a meeting lasting several hours convening for a second time on Monday after they had broken off discussions a day earlier. Tensions escalated sharply since Israel installed the metal detectors at entry points to Al-Aqsa mosque compound in Jerusalem after two police guards were shot dead by gunmen there on July 14. (Writing by Ori Lewis; Editing by James Dalgleish) -- © Copyright Reuters 2017-07-25