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  1. THAILAND LIVE

    Two Phuket nightlife venues raided, charged with operating illegally Phuket Gazette - 'Room Bar and Restaurant' was one of the venues raider by officers from the Crime Suppression Division 5. Photo: Kritsada Mueanhawong PHUKET: -- Officers from the Crime Suppression Division yesterday raided two nightlife venues in Phuket Town for providing services to underage customers and operating without a proper permit. Full story: https://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/993853-two-phuket-nightlife-venues-raided-charged-with-operating-illegally/
  2. Two Phuket nightlife venues raided, charged with operating illegally Phuket Gazette - 'Room Bar and Restaurant' was one of the venues raider by officers from the Crime Suppression Division 5. Photo: Kritsada Mueanhawong PHUKET: -- Officers from the Crime Suppression Division yesterday raided two nightlife venues in Phuket Town for providing services to underage customers and operating without a proper permit. “We found two illegal venues during the raid. The first one was 'Room Bar and Restaurant'. The owner, Rattachat Phothong, was charged with operating a nightlife venue without permission,” said Phuket Provincial Police Deputy Commander Peerayuth Karajedee. The second venue was named by police as the ‘New Jame Cafe’. The owner, Jeerawat Ratnothai, was charged with operating a nightlife venue without permission, while the manager, Somboon Sriyotha, was charged with serving people under 18 years of age. Source: http://www.phuketgazette.net/phuket-news/Two-Phuket-nightlife-venues-raided-charged-operating/66799?desktopversion#ad-image-0 -- © Copyright Phuket Gazette 2017-07-24
  3. THAILAND LIVE

    Thailand to send back trafficking victims, assist on migration to third country BANGKOK, 24 July 2017 (NNT) – Thailand has prioritized on human trafficking cases involving Rohingya people in accordance to human rights principles, and is set to return trafficking victims to their country of origin, says the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Full story: https://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/993852-thailand-to-send-back-trafficking-victims-assist-on-migration-to-third-country/
  4. Thailand to send back trafficking victims, assist on migration to third country BANGKOK, 24 July 2017 (NNT) – Thailand has prioritized on human trafficking cases involving Rohingya people in accordance to human rights principles, and is set to return trafficking victims to their country of origin, says the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Ministry of Foreign Affair's Director-General of the Department of Information Busadee Santipitaks has addressed the return of Rohingya people involved in human trafficking cases back to their country of origin, saying that the Thai government has been providing protection to the victims and has provided them with healthcare, occupation opportunities, and is working to assist their return home or their migration to a third country. She has said trafficking victims are legally allowed to stay in Thailand for 2 years after the conclusion of case proceedings, according to the Cabinet's resolution on 13 December 2017. The Thai government has been working with the country of origin to send back trafficking victims who chose to return, and has been collaborating with the United Nations High Commissioner For Refugee (UNHCR) and International Organization for Migration (IOM) for victims who wishes to migrate to a third country. Thailand has also provided 245 translators to assist the victims including people from Myanmar, Rohingya, Cambodia, Laos, Malaysia, and Vietnam. The Thai government has also given special priority to the protection of child trafficking victims by providing special training to related officials. -- nnt 2017-07-24
  5. THAILAND LIVE

    Complaint of three safety violations lodged with the police against CPF BANGKOK: -- Safety inspectors of the Department of Labour Welfare and Protection lodged a complaint against Charoen Pokphand Foods Company with the police last Wednesday over the death of a student trainee and four staff members of the company on June 23. Full story: https://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/993851-complaint-of-three-safety-violations-lodged-with-the-police-against-cpf/
  6. Complaint of three safety violations lodged with the police against CPF BANGKOK: -- Safety inspectors of the Department of Labour Welfare and Protection lodged a complaint against Charoen Pokphand Foods Company with the police last Wednesday over the death of a student trainee and four staff members of the company on June 23. The department chief Mr Sumet Mahosot said that the safety inspectors questioned officials concerned and conducted on-site investigation and come up with the conclusion that the company had committed three safety violations as specified in the safety law and regulations on working in airless area. He said, firstly, CPF failed to notify its staff working in the wastewater treatment pond of the risks to life involved which may occur and also failed to provide working manuals to its staff. Full story: http://englishnews.thaipbs.or.th/complaint-three-safety-violations-lodged-police-cpf/ -- © Copyright Thai PBS 2017-07-24
  7. THAILAND LIVE

    Fishing crew plucked from the sea after floating many hours in the rough sea By Thai PBS SURAT THANI: -- A fishing crewman who accidentally fell from his vessel into the sea on Friday night was plucked from the sea by a freighter Saturday morning. Full story: https://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/993850-fishing-crew-plucked-from-the-sea-after-floating-many-hours-in-the-rough-sea/
  8. Fishing crew plucked from the sea after floating many hours in the rough sea By Thai PBS SURAT THANI: -- A fishing crewman who accidentally fell from his vessel into the sea on Friday night was plucked from the sea by a freighter Saturday morning. The crewman, Somchit Polraksa,25, was handed over to marine police at PK pier in Muang district of Surat Thani on Saturday night. Somchit told the police that he accidentally fell from his fishing boat, Pornmanachai 99, at about 7 pm of Friday night without the notice of the other crew members. He said that the sea then was choppy and the wind strong. Full story: http://englishnews.thaipbs.or.th/fishing-crew-plucked-sea-floating-many-hours-rough-sea/ -- © Copyright Thai PBS 2017-07-24
  9. THAILAND LIVE

    Victims of human trafficking can stay in Thailand and work legally for two years By Thai PBS The Rohingya migrants who were victims of the human trafficking gang convicted last week by the court and the prosecution witnesses are allowed to remain in Thailand for two years and also to work legally after the conclusion of the court trial, according to the Foreign Affairs Ministry. Full story: https://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/993848-victims-of-human-trafficking-can-stay-in-thailand-and-work-legally-for-two-years/
  10. Victims of human trafficking can stay in Thailand and work legally for two years By Thai PBS The Rohingya migrants who were victims of the human trafficking gang convicted last week by the court and the prosecution witnesses are allowed to remain in Thailand for two years and also to work legally after the conclusion of the court trial, according to the Foreign Affairs Ministry. The special treatment for these illegal Rohingya migrants is in accordance with the cabinet’s resolution dated December 13 last year, said the ministry. The court on Wednesday convicted 62 suspects to serve jail terms ranging from 4 to 94 years after finding them guilty of involvement in human trafficking. Full story: http://englishnews.thaipbs.or.th/victims-human-trafficking-can-stay-thailand-work-legally-two-years/ -- © Copyright Thai PBS 2017-07-24
  11. THAILAND LIVE

    OPINION Thailand’s reconciliation trap is preventing democratic progress By Titipol Phakdeewanich Special to The Nation This week, the National Council for Peace and Order (NCPO) launched a nationwide “social contract” as part of its reconciliation plan, which began in March. In essence, the military-drafted social contract aims to reunite the country in the hope that Thai people can move forwards together. Full story: https://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/993847-thailand’s-reconciliation-trap-is-preventing-democratic-progress/
  12. OPINION Thailand’s reconciliation trap is preventing democratic progress By Titipol Phakdeewanich Special to The Nation This week, the National Council for Peace and Order (NCPO) launched a nationwide “social contract” as part of its reconciliation plan, which began in March. In essence, the military-drafted social contract aims to reunite the country in the hope that Thai people can move forwards together. The NCPO says this is a significant step forward since the 2014 coup, and should resolve Thailand’s decade-long political division. However, military-led reconciliation has met with sceptical responses both inside and outside the country. Observers question whether it can truly reunite Thailand as a nation, or whether it is simply a political ploy for the military to gain trust and legitimacy, rather than allow reconciliation led by all parties involved. So, can the junta’s dream of forced reconciliation become a reality? The military is fully aware of public scepticism over its role and involvement in the reconciliation process. Thus it has made clear that it will attend the public reconciliation forums only to listen, not to express any opinion or discuss issues, so as to ensure that “invited participants” are free to express their views on conflict solutions and reconciliation. One such forum was held this week at the 21st Military Circle in Nakhon Ratchasima province. An impression it left was that foreign countries and institutions are a potential threat to national security, and their actions and criticism directed at Thailand – particularly in relation to its politics, democracy and human rights since 2014 – are interpreted as a form of intervention. Freedom House classified Thailand as “Not Free” in its 2017 report on political and civil rights. Though organised by the military, the NCPO’s reconciliation process is in fact little different from the process pursued under the administration of Abhisit Vejjajiva. Following the 2010 crackdown on red-shirt protesters, Abhisit initiated the National Reform Committee (NRC), chaired by former prime minister Anand Panyarachun. In 2013, we also witnessed reconciliation attempts under the government of Yingluck Shinawatra, who invited the former British prime minister Tony Blair to speak on reconciliation. The NCPO’s public forums have delivered similar information to those held under Abhisit’s NRC, with proposals for economic, social and political reforms aimed especially at more equable allocation of public resources. In fact, this latest reconciliation effort is providing no new information, instead only mirroring and repeating data already known to the Thai public and international observers from the earlier process. The junta outwardly claims that Thailand is a democratic country moving towards a more democratic environment. However there is plenty of cause for scepticism over whether the military believes that Thailand’s political divide can be bridged through a more democratic environment. Throughout the three years since the May 2014 coup, the NCPO has attempted to introduce a military culture as an integral component of “Thai-style” democracy. Inside barracks, power and force, order and commands, are vital to the proper functioning of the Thai military. Seniority based on rank and the strict enforcement of a hierarchical structure is the mechanism that creates unity. Indeed, this kind of military culture is almost identical to the prevailing concept of “Thainess” enshrined in the NCPO’s “Twelve Core Values for a Strong Thailand”. The military’s prioritising of reconciliation ahead of democracy and human rights makes complete sense to the vast majority of Thais. This is reinforced by memories of the economic damage caused by chaotic rallies in Bangkok and elsewhere, particularly during the protests in 2010 by the red shirts and in 2013-2014 by the People’s Democratic Reform Committee (PDRC). So what would Thailand be like under a social contract enforced by the military? Despite its claims go the contrary, the contract is nothing other than a rejection of genuine representative democracy, in favour of establishing a “Thai-style” democracy, in which liberty and freedom are secondary to “order” and “stability”. The NCPO has repeatedly told the Thai people and the international community that Thailand’s cultural uniqueness cannot be undermined by its international commitments and international law, particularly human rights. Instead of falling into a reconciliation trap, the military and other Thai authorities must be more open-minded in acknowledging the issues surrounding country’s political conflicts, which are much wider than income inequality and imbalances. Indeed, Thailand’s political conflicts are seated in a poor understanding and perhaps rejection of the universal concept of human rights, which embrace and endorse dignity, rights, liberty, equality and freedom. These key values are given only a token place in the Thai education system, and have not yet been fully integrated. From school to university, young Thais are taught to respect adults, and to “live in harmony and promote unity” so that Thailand can be a peaceful, strong and independent society. These characteristics of “Thainess” are not necessarily anti-democratic and anti-human rights, but the ways in they are taught to young generations are an obstacle for Thailand’s democratic progress. Today, it is increasingly difficult to convince a majority of Thais that promotion of democracy and human rights can produce natural reconciliation and minimise conflicts, through greater equality and respect for individual dignity regardless of social background. Of course, democracy cannot guarantee equality and unity. But the rule of law is a democratic means to ensure that people’s rights are protected from violation by the state and individuals. In Thailand the law is not always applied equally across all groups. Unity and harmony cannot be forced, but are rather a product of the true and honest promotion of equality and rights. This challenge will persist as long as Thailand continues to overrule the universal concept of human rights, and keeps falling into the reconciliation trap and historic pride in its Thainess. Titipol Phakdeewanich is dean of the Faculty of Political Science at Ubon Ratchathani University, and a visiting fellow at the Centre for the Study of Globalisation and Regionalisation at the University of Warwick in England. Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/opinion/30321469 -- © Copyright The Nation 2017-07-24
  13. THAILAND LIVE

    Thailand ‘has potential to be medical tourism leader’ By Sirivish Toomgum The Nation Medical fair organiser says global market growing 25% a year BANGKOK: -- Thailand can emerge as the region’s top medical tourism hotspot, as the country attracts 550,000 Asean medical tourists yearly, according to Gernot Ringling, managing director of the trade fair organiser Messe Dusseldorf Asia. Full story: https://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/993846-thailand-‘has-potential-to-be-medical-tourism-leader’/
  14. Thailand ‘has potential to be medical tourism leader’ By Sirivish Toomgum The Nation Medical fair organiser says global market growing 25% a year BANGKOK: -- Thailand can emerge as the region’s top medical tourism hotspot, as the country attracts 550,000 Asean medical tourists yearly, according to Gernot Ringling, managing director of the trade fair organiser Messe Dusseldorf Asia. “Across the region, medical tourism is on the rise with more than 3.5 million consumers arriving in Southeast Asia annually. “Globally, the medical tourism market is expanding by up to 25 per cent each year and is worth more than US$55 billion (Bt1.8 trillion) annually. “Out of the more than 11 million global medical consumers, nearly a third travel to Southeast Asia,” said Ringling. As Southeast Asia’s public and private health systems are increasingly embracing and funding technology enabled care to follow their European and North American counterparts, advanced technologies that can deliver scalable, efficient and highquality care are becoming increasingly popular in the region. For instance, the increasing use of robotic surgery, 3D printing, implantable devices, use of automation and artificial intelligence in clinical settings, and other digital innovations for prevention, monitoring and treatment are among the hottest products and solutions and trends across Southeast Asia. Messe Dusseldorf Asia, a subsidiary of Messe Dusseldorf in Germany, one of the world’s leading trade fair organisers, will hold the eighth Medical Fair Thailand at the Queen Sirikit National Convention Centre from September 6 to 8. Among the highlights are rehabilitative care and connected healthcare, such as digital healthcare equipment and solutions, and wearable technologies that are rapidly transforming the market. “Rehabilitative care and connected healthcare are fast growing sectors within the medical and healthcare industry and these specialised healthcare areas are gaining traction due to an ageing population and a tech savvy middle class,” Ringling said. The ageing societies in the region will result in greater healthcare expenditures by the elderly. Singapore and Thailand have the highest percentage of ageing population above 65 years. The percentage of people over age 65 is expected to more than quadruple by 2050 in Southeast Asia. Zion Research forecasts that the global home healthcare market, including rehabilitation, is expected to grow to $391.41 billion by 2021. Based on the “Market Research Future Report”, the global connected healthcare market will reach $105.33 billion by 2022, with the AsiaPacific market expected to be the fastest growing, reaching $24.07 billion by 2022. The $100 billion medical industry can contribute as an economic booster to Southeast Asian countries. Medical manufacturing is one of the key growth areas in Asean region. The medical device market in these countries is projected to double from $4.6 billion in 2013 to $9 billion by 2019. More than 700 exhibitors from 45 countries are expected to join the fair. Around 18 national pavilions and groups, including debut group participation from Canada, the European Union, India, the Netherlands and Russia, will present more than 5,000 state of theart medical and healthcare products, equipment and solutions to a targeted audience of 10,000 medical and healthcare professionals. Alongside the exhibition, the fair will also feature seminars, forums, conferences and technical presentations. Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/business/30321561 -- © Copyright The Nation 2017-07-24
  15. THAILAND LIVE

    Pop-up centres to register migrant workers By THE NATION BANGKOK: -- The Department of Skill Development (DSD) has set up 100 temporary centres nationwide for employers to register migrant workers. Full story: https://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/993845-pop-up-centres-to-register-migrant-workers/