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96tehtarp

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About 96tehtarp

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    Nakhon Ratchaithani
  1. For clarification... which types of entry can be converted to Non-B without leaving Thailand? For example: 1.) 30 days visa exempt entry ==> Can it be converted here within Thailand , or must one leave Thailand and apply at an embassy outside Thailand? 2.) 60 day tourist visa exempt entry ==> Can it be converted here, or must one leave Thailand and apply at an embassy outside Thailand?
  2. Several years ago I entered Thailand on a Non-O visa granted to me because I'm married to a Thai national. I have been living here on yearly extensions ever since. I have a job opportunity in an adjacent province and I have rented an apartment near my job. I am registered with immigration in the new province and recently successfully did a 90 days report at the new address. My work permit application was accepted based on my original (several years old) Non-O visa. Am I correct to assume that work is permitted on my type of Non-O visa? I know this should be obvious... but I'll ask anyway. My annual extension of stay is coming up in a few months. Will I need to re-register my address in my wife's province to accomplish that extension? The province where I live with my wife could care less where foreigners stay, or so it seems. The province I will be working in is very strict about address registrations for foreigners. My landlord tells me not to worry, but to inform him each time I return after staying elsewhere even if it was for only as little as 24 hours. That might be 50+ times a year, or every weekend. What problems, if any, should I expect? I don't see any obvious problems, but I thought I should ask the forum, just in case.
  3. Dengue Fever

    In Thai they usually refer to Dengue Fever as "kai leut awk" which loosely translated is "fever blood runs-out" or something along that line. This is is the most dangerous form of Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever where an afflicted person suffers from bleeding from pores and other body orifices. Yes, it is transmitted by the daytime mosquito variety "Aedes aegypti." They have white tiger/zebra stripes and are easy to recognize. Lots of pictures can be found here https://www.startpage.com/do/search?q=Aedes+aegypti&nj=0&cat=pics In my Thai town any cases of Dengue fever found at the hospital are reported to the local health authorities who pinpoint the specific soi where the afflicted person lives. They usually spray the soi and adjacent sois immediately after even one case. About twice a year we have a volunteer team who go on a sort of neighborhood mosquito watch. They invade everyone's homes and look for water pots and other potential mosquito breeding grounds. If our house passes we get a bright florescent green sticker on the front door. The most common victims I've seen are young kids who watch TV cartoons indoors on Saturday and Sunday mornings. It might be a good idea to burn a mosquito coil during those times.
  4. What is the cost for Bravecto (Fluralaner)? I'm going to try it. I've been injecting Ivermectin on my three dogs for a couple of years, however this year it's not very effective.
  5. Your Linux distribution

    Slackware
  6. Or the checkout staff at Tesco, BigC, or even hotel cleaning staff.
  7. Embracing Online Education

    Q1.) What do you think is holding Thais back from embracing this new form of learning? A1 - I think a lack of opportunity is holding them back. The online technology is already here in most government schools and easily accessible, however for most Thai people there is nearly zero opportunity to make any use of English anywhere outside of a "multiple choice" test in school . There is no perceived opportunity to travel to English speaking counties for most Thais, due to visa/cost and this is a big disincentive. "Why should I learn English as I'm never going to travel anywhere where I'll use it and nobody speaks it here at home?" -- apathy -- lack of opportunity to use English -- and other disincentives. Of course there are exceptions, but they aren't part of the majority who are being held back. Q2. ) What do you think is stopping teachers from getting together to form a cohesive plan around this new form of learning? A2 - Again, it's a lack of opportunity. Foreign teachers are not wanted in Thailand, although their necessity is acknowledged by the system. It is therefore very unlikely they would ever stand a chance of them getting together and forming a successful cohesive plan. On the other hand, the rank and file Thai teachers are faced with a lack of opportunity caused by all the disincentives a top-down political organization can offer them. The current situation places a very high priority on Prayut's "Thainess" and many government schools have a high level of underutilized IT infrastructure. A cohesive plan. Like Singapore's? They did it. See: Forbes article on Lee Kuan Yew's bilingual policy for Singapore. For the foreseeable future Thai educators seem focused on Thainess. That's what the top-down given priority is. That's not to say Thainess and ELL/CALL are mutually exclusive.
  8. Hat Yai city travel advice wanted.

    Thanks, garrya. There are plenty of malls in Bangkok, but I want to fly somewhere, and Hat Yai is one of the cheapest flights from BKK, all in sometimes less than 1500 baht.
  9. I plan to fly down from Bangkok with my son. (First airplane ride for him.) I heard there is a huge shopping mall in Hat Yai. What's it called, and what's it got, amusements and food wise? Are there any decent hotels adjoining, or very nearby? Thanks.
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