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North Korea does not want war, world does not want regime change: U.N.

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North Korea does not want war, world does not want regime change: U.N.

By Tom Miles

 

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North Korean leader Kim Jong Un waves to people attending a military parade marking the 105th birth anniversary of country's founding father, Kim Il Sung in Pyongyang, April 15, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj/Files

 

GENEVA (Reuters) - North Korea does not want to start a nuclear war and the world is not seeking to overthrow its leader Kim Jong Un, the U.N. disarmament chief said on Tuesday.

 

Izumi Nakamitsu, U.N. High Representative for Disarmament Affairs, said there was hope for a peaceful end to the tension caused by the nuclear ambitions of North Korea, also known as Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK).

"I don’t think DPRK wants to start a nuclear war," she told a news conference in Geneva.

 

On Monday, the U.N. Security Council unanimously decided to step up sanctions on North Korea after its sixth and largest nuclear test, prompting a war of words between diplomats at the Conference on Disarmament in Geneva.

 

Asked if the pressure on North Korea was pushing the world to the brink of nuclear war, Nakamitsu said U.N. officials were in touch with all sides and nobody - including North Korea - saw a military solution to the crisis.

 

"That is just too catastrophic," she said. "I think we all understand the consequences of a military escalation, a 'military solution'. That's why we keep saying that it would not be a solution for anyone, including DPRK."

 

She added: "Maybe I'm missing something but as far as I hear, no one is really asking for any collapse of DPRK, quite the contrary. No one is talking about regime change, quite the contrary."

 

She was also hopeful that, as in the past, increased nuclear tensions might yield progress in disarmament talks.

 

"When people say that because the international security environment is so difficult, tensions are so high, that we can’t discuss disarmament, that is historically not accurate."

 

U.N. Secretary General Antonio Guterres has offered to play a role in mediating, as has Switzerland. So far no such steps have been taken, but the United Nations was prepared to get involved if asked to do so, Nakamitsu said.

 

"We are definitely preparing ourselves, exploring scenarios as part of our normal contingency planning."

 

(Reporting by Tom Miles; Editing by Janet Lawrence)

 
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-- © Copyright Reuters 2017-09-13

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"We are definitely preparing ourselves, exploring scenarios as part of our normal contingency planning."


11th hour risk/ disaster prevention is not contingency planning.

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North Korea does not want war, world does not want regime change

 

The first part may be true because NK will be wiped off the map. The second is not true, assassination is a real possibility.

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I hope she is correct in her assessment, though I suspect the fat man will be ready to see his country annihilated before he will back down. Very difficult to see a good solution to this.

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21 minutes ago, craigt3365 said:

But the world wants a denuclearized Korean peninsula.

Does that world include Russia?

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10 minutes ago, retarius said:

Kim like the rest of us

:cheesy:

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2 hours ago, webfact said:

"That is just too catastrophic," she said. "I think we all understand the consequences of a military escalation, a 'military solution'. That's why we keep saying that it would not be a solution for anyone, including DPRK."

an intellectual take on a megalomanic ; about the same as a debate on whether stupidity is dangerous: Pointless

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Just now, ilostmypassword said:

We've seen how well waging war in the name of regime change has worked in recent past.

Most attempts at regime change were done during the cold war.  Russia was on the other side doing the exact same thing.  So probably not good examples, and many were decades ago.

 

Regime change is a tough one.  Successful ones might be Kuwait and Panama?  As Max states, NK would be a prime example of one where it's needed.  How to make it successful is tough.

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BANGKOK 14 December 2017 03:37
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