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North Korea does not want war, world does not want regime change: U.N.

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craigt3365    17,860
17 minutes ago, baboon said:

Pro peace, anti neofascist/imperialist scum. Nothing wrong with most Americans.

So what Kim is doing is pro peace?

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baboon    11,076
5 hours ago, hawker9000 said:

"North Korea does not want war, world does not want regime change: U.N."

Thanks, UN.   I'm SO reassured...

 

What a bunch of fumbling, stumbling bozos tripping over their own clown shoes.   Psychoboy has maneuvered himself into a position of almost needing war just to keep on keeping on, and the world - aside from the usual thug sympathizers, the UN obviously, and that dim bulb Merkel - is pretty much finally getting this.

 

I am sure the generals surrounding Trump are far from fumbling, stumbling bozos. Let us hope that they continue to keep him in check.

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MaxYakov    1,476
1 hour ago, baboon said:

I am sure the generals surrounding Trump are far from fumbling, stumbling bozos. Let us hope that they continue to keep him in check.

Like they did with the Shayrat Tomahawk CM Strike on April 7, for example? What was it, only 59? I wonder who's keeping whom "in check" these days.

Ayutthaya_overwalk.jpeg

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Thechook    9,350

Doesn't want war, ok.  Is this the same idiot who said he is going to reduce the U.S to Ashes? 

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craigt3365    17,860
9 minutes ago, Thechook said:

Doesn't want war, ok.  Is this the same idiot who said he is going to reduce the U.S to Ashes? 

Yes, along with Japan.  And they just fired another missile over Japan.

 

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ELVIS123456    426

This is getting out of hand - and that is how wars start.

http://www.skynews.com.au/news/top-stories/2017/09/15/north-korea-fires-missile-toward-japan.html

And wars are not stopped by UN resolutions or other useless BS statements.

Hopefully China will see that a war in NK will destroy their economic recovery, and will take serious action to pull them into line. But they do not want a united Korea - they want a buffer zone to a 'western' country which SK essentially is (like Japan). 

 

NK is not ruled by a dictator or politician. NK is ruled by an Emperor King who acts like a dictator (to us). The NK system ensures that the people idolise their leader - he uses the West as a tool in that control system. It is like Japan was prior to WW2 (and China before Mao).  And that is part of the problem of deciding a solution - the people of NK will not take kindly the destruction of their idolised Emperor King. Getting rid of Kim is not like getting rid of Idi Amin who most Ugandans despised.

 

 

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4MyEgo    1,791
On 13/09/2017 at 10:06 AM, quadperfect said:

I think he wants a nuclear war. He is acting like a idiot and the world agrees.

Sheep.....bah bah, think outside the sqaure, i.e. why is the US applying pressure, on second thoughts, spare me

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ilostmypassword    6,726
2 hours ago, ELVIS123456 said:

This is getting out of hand - and that is how wars start.

http://www.skynews.com.au/news/top-stories/2017/09/15/north-korea-fires-missile-toward-japan.html

And wars are not stopped by UN resolutions or other useless BS statements.

Hopefully China will see that a war in NK will destroy their economic recovery, and will take serious action to pull them into line. But they do not want a united Korea - they want a buffer zone to a 'western' country which SK essentially is (like Japan). 

 

NK is not ruled by a dictator or politician. NK is ruled by an Emperor King who acts like a dictator (to us). The NK system ensures that the people idolise their leader - he uses the West as a tool in that control system. It is like Japan was prior to WW2 (and China before Mao).  And that is part of the problem of deciding a solution - the people of NK will not take kindly the destruction of their idolised Emperor King. Getting rid of Kim is not like getting rid of Idi Amin who most Ugandans despised.

 

 

Where is your evidence that the North Koreans idolize the Kim Dynasty?

https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/asia_pacific/what-do-north-koreans-think-about-kim-jong-un-this-survey-tries-to-find-out/2016/11/01/2a2cc357-34a9-464c-b32f-1291d16dd1b0_story.html?utm_term=.0d73f1ebd78b

https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/asia_pacific/what-do-north-koreans-think-about-kim-jong-un-this-survey-tries-to-find-out/2016/11/01/2a2cc357-34a9-464c-b32f-1291d16dd1b0_story.html?utm_term=.0d73f1ebd78b

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/northkorea/9191998/What-North-Koreans-really-think-of-Kim-Jong-un.html

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/09/08/AR2010090807085.html

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MaxYakov    1,476
1 hour ago, ilostmypassword said:

Thanks! The first and second Washington Post links were duplicates pointing to the same article and that was based on a 36-NK-person survey - but it does have video by Anna Fifield reporting from Pyongyang (which wouldn't play for me).

 

The UK Telegraph article was enlightening and was worth a read just to discover this NK news site (based in Seoul):

 

Daily NK - English Language - Live from Seoul  [link]

 

The third Washington Post link was pointing to a quite dated, 2010 article and contained citizens' statements about his potential succession.

 

It would be plausible to me that a majority of the non-inner-circle people in the DPRK ( > 90% by my guesstimate) would push him over a cliff, given half a chance. However, as Brigitte Gabriel put it about other masses that have been in similar situations: They are irrelevant.

 

The relevant ones, AFAIC, are the fanatics and the brainwashed (probably the minority who have access to weapons) who are willing to go to their graves with him doing whatever he orders them to do.

Edited by MaxYakov

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ilostmypassword    6,726
2 hours ago, MaxYakov said:

Thanks! The first and second Washington Post links were duplicates pointing to the same article and that was based on a 36-NK-person survey - but it does have video by Anna Fifield reporting from Pyongyang (which wouldn't play for me).

 

The UK Telegraph article was enlightening and was worth a read just to discover this NK news site (based in Seoul):

 

Daily NK - English Language - Live from Seoul  [link]

 

The third Washington Post link was pointing to a quite dated, 2010 article and contained citizens' statements about his potential succession.

 

It would be plausible to me that a majority of the non-inner-circle people in the DPRK ( > 90% by my guesstimate) would push him over a cliff, given half a chance. However, as Brigitte Gabriel put it about other masses that have been in similar situations: They are irrelevant.

 

The relevant ones, AFAIC, are the fanatics and the brainwashed (probably the minority who have access to weapons) who are willing to go to their graves with him doing whatever he orders them to do.

Just to clear what you are saying differs from what elvis123456 said.

As for your assertion, how do you know this? Do you have any links? Maybe a putsch is just around the corner. I do know about that NK site. In fact, I cited a few times an article by one of its chief scholars who cautions against thinking that the current Kim is insane. But I forgot to do a search. Here's something somewhat germane:

Kim Jong Un's fearpolitik and marketization policies eroding public sentiment
"A panel of experts noted this week that although Kim Jong Un has made several ‘achievements’ including the 7th Party Congress, two nuclear tests, and 24 missile launches to stabilize the regime, he is creating internal dissent with the continuing reign of fear.
 
An influx of information through marketization is also thought to be growing beyond the control of the regime, which may accelerate instability in the middle and long term as an increasing number of residents prioritize their personal finances in place of obedience to the leadership. 
 
At the event, hosted by the Institute for National Security Strategy (INCC), Shin Gak Soo, Director of the Center for International Law in Korea National Diplomatic Academy, said, "The North Korean regime has been sustained by three factors: idolization, control, and communism. But [nascent] marketization and the influx of information spreading recently have been eroding its authority from within."

Doubts over regime cut across all demographics

I also found this which seems to address the question of the loyalty of the elites:
Following the defection of a group of overseas restaurant workers in April, the family of Thae Yong Ho, the former North Korean diplomatic minister to Britain, entered South Korea in August. There have also been internal reports that ranking officials belonging to state institutions including the State Security Department are considering defection. This phenomenon indicates that unlike in the past when the 'subsistence issue' was the primary motivating factor for defection, the 'political cause' is becoming increasingly more common.
 
Edited by ilostmypassword
correcting a link

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MaxYakov    1,476
45 minutes ago, ilostmypassword said:

Just to clear what you are saying differs from what elvis123456 said.

As for your assertion, how do you know this? Do you have any links? Maybe a putsch is just around the corner. I do know about that NK site. In fact, I cited a few times an article by one of its chief scholars who cautions against thinking that the current Kim is insane. But I forgot to do a search. Here's something somewhat germane:

Kim Jong Un's fearpolitik and marketization policies eroding public sentiment
"A panel of experts noted this week that although Kim Jong Un has made several ‘achievements’ including the 7th Party Congress, two nuclear tests, and 24 missile launches to stabilize the regime, he is creating internal dissent with the continuing reign of fear.
 
An influx of information through marketization is also thought to be growing beyond the control of the regime, which may accelerate instability in the middle and long term as an increasing number of residents prioritize their personal finances in place of obedience to the leadership. 
 
At the event, hosted by the Institute for National Security Strategy (INCC), Shin Gak Soo, Director of the Center for International Law in Korea National Diplomatic Academy, said, "The North Korean regime has been sustained by three factors: idolization, control, and communism. But [nascent] marketization and the influx of information spreading recently have been eroding its authority from within."

Doubts over regime cut across all demographics

I also found this which seems to address the question of the loyalty of the elites:
Following the defection of a group of overseas restaurant workers in April, the family of Thae Yong Ho, the former North Korean diplomatic minister to Britain, entered South Korea in August. There have also been internal reports that ranking officials belonging to state institutions including the State Security Department are considering defection. This phenomenon indicates that unlike in the past when the 'subsistence issue' was the primary motivating factor for defection, the 'political cause' is becoming increasingly more common.
 

Didn't you carefully read the very article for which you provided a link? If you had, you would have known about DailyNK. Didn't I say "guesstimate" or did you miss that as well. My opinions are based on historic and current observed precedents and human nature, and my (admittedly) low-info-driven guesstimates that's all.

 

I believe it's optimistic to assume large-scale defection or a revolution in the DPRK. If they're going to do it, they'd better get with the program before they are forced to go down with their (idolized or not) leader.

 

Thanks for the DailyNK article regarding last November's Institute for National Security Strategy conference [link]. A panel of "experts" and "academicians", one of which went so far as to propose having SK being building nuclear weapons:

 

"Regarding the new US administration, Professor Kim noted that, "We need to prepare for new measures to develop our own deterrence capabilities in case the US-South alliance becomes weaker. We need to strengthen our ability to develop nuclear weapons using our own considerable scientific resources, even if we fall short of becoming a nuclear power, and use it as diplomatic leverage."" (emphasis is mine)

 

What kind of strategy is that?!

 

Also, defection for "political cause" becoming "increasingly more common", from the Doubts over regime cut across all demographics -  DailyNK - Nov, 2016 [link], just doesn't do it for me. Thanks for finding the article for us, but we should all be aware that the DailyNK is not an official DPRK news site and could be considered propaganda (not that a DPRK news site wouldn't also be propaganda). The article is an interesting read, but I have to ask: Are the defectors and potential defectors among the relevant?

 

This is another of my opinions, which I am "asserting" and cannot offer substantial proof thereof. Do you know anyone who can?

 

Good Luck with these in the future:

 

Opinion = Assertion

Links = Truth

 

PS: I see you're still having trouble with fonts and text-anchored hyperlinks.

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BANGKOK 20 September 2017 00:14
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