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sklmeeera

Teach Thailand without formal Degree

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I know its possible to work illegally in Thailand but is it possible to somehow get a work permit without a degree ? Assuming that one qualifies as a teacher with the experience ?

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Possible, but not easy, at least in the OBEC schooling system.

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In my opinion, the minimum requirement is the TEFL certificate.  (Teaching English as a Foreign Language).  This at least teaches the concepts of language learning, activities, references, teaching methods, and strengthens the grammar and punctuation.

A degree in say, horticulture, or soil science, is not really going to help.

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With the new rules about working I think it will be hard

 

It depends where you are looking

 

Your best bet would be to see If a.M agency will hire you

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Thailand being Thailand, anything is possible. That said, if you want to get a teacher's license [which is required in order to get the work permit] it'll be an uphill struggle without a degree.

It's been a while since I was a teacher, but this was the case 10 years ago, and I doubt that things have changed much since then...

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it's pretty much a shame where in this country two parties can't contract to do business together without the government interfering. Who really suffers from this micromanagement meddling? The Thai people of course. This government is so out to control the foreigners that they just can't see who it really hurts. Obviously the Thai people are just not smart enough to decide how to spend their hard earned money on what services on their own, they need to be controlled by an entity that is completely out of touch with the people.

I wonder what would happen if this issue were put to vote, the democratic way.

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As others have said, it's possible but not easy. Language schools and corporate teaching would be your best bet.

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51 minutes ago, gr8fldanielle said:

it's pretty much a shame where in this country two parties can't contract to do business together without the government interfering. Who really suffers from this micromanagement meddling? The Thai people of course. This government is so out to control the foreigners that they just can't see who it really hurts. Obviously the Thai people are just not smart enough to decide how to spend their hard earned money on what services on their own, they need to be controlled by an entity that is completely out of touch with the people.

I wonder what would happen if this issue were put to vote, the democratic way.

You don't get it, they don't want to make it easy for the general population to learn English, people would then be able to learn properly on the English speaking internet which they can't on the severely restricted Thai language one, The last thing a government run by the elite, for the elite needs is an educated population, this would be very dangerous for them....

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You might be able to get your 'foot in the door', then I would suggest you get the formal credentials finished either online or brick and mortar as soon as you can.

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You just need to pick some language schools and show yourself. You won't get satisfactory answer by phone calls. 

Good luck

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I am sure there is some loophole the OP could exploit to obtain a work permit without the proper credentials.  What kind of standard of living does the OP expect to have working in a school that accepts someone without a degree? Let's say one does find work for a dodgy language school, or a countryside school without the proper credentials. There is still a waiver system, which makes sure of two things: 1. commitment/entrapment to one school whether you like it there or not 2. self-guided professional development while the school awaits a degree with 'Education' in its title.  Professional development courses like the PGCEi can run as high as 200,000 baht.  What person working in a Thai government school or a language school could realistically afford that?   

 

I think the question should be not whether the OP could teach in Thailand without proper credentials, but whether one would actually want to.  Look forward to large classes, little pay, and minimal support. But hey, if that's your thing, go for it.

 

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I am sure there is some loophole the OP could exploit to obtain a work permit without the proper credentials.  What kind of standard of living does the OP expect to have working in a school that accepts someone without a degree? Let's say one does find work for a dodgy language school, or a countryside school without the proper credentials. There is still a waiver system, which makes sure of two things: 1. commitment/entrapment to one school whether you like it there or not 2. self-guided professional development while the school awaits a degree with 'Education' in its title.  Professional development courses like the PGCEi can run as high as 200,000 baht.  What person working in a Thai government school or a language school could realistically afford that?   
 
I think the question should be not whether the OP could teach in Thailand without proper credentials, but whether one would actually want to.  Look forward to large classes, little pay, and minimal support. But hey, if that's your thing, go for it.
 

A degree (which can be in any subject) doesn't equal teaching credentials. A decent TEFL course, like a CELTA or Trinity, does. However, like it or not, a degree is normally required by schools. As I said earlier, corporate teaching, for which there is a big market in Bangkok, is less restrictive, as are some language schools which pay well for IELTS and other exam prep.

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8 hours ago, gr8fldanielle said:

it's pretty much a shame where in this country two parties can't contract to do business together without the government interfering. Who really suffers from this micromanagement meddling? The Thai people of course. This government is so out to control the foreigners that they just can't see who it really hurts. Obviously the Thai people are just not smart enough to decide how to spend their hard earned money on what services on their own, they need to be controlled by an entity that is completely out of touch with the people.

I wonder what would happen if this issue were put to vote, the democratic way.

It needs  to be   considered  that  although  there  may be genuine individuals  who  are  frustrated  by the  mandate of  regulation that those  same individuals  are  not  aware  of the  fraudulent pretenders  it is designed  to  limit.

Thai people  are  no less  gullible  than  any  other  population in reality  but need  some  level of  defence   via  regulatory requirements such as  this as  any  other   nationality.  Two  party contracts   may well  be possible. But  pseudo two  party  (  third  party school employment)  is  what the   regulations  are  intended  for. Not  unreasonable   to  my  thinking.

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BANGKOK 25 November 2017 10:52
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