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Nineteen soldiers, police hurt in Yala double bomb attack

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webfact    24,332

Nineteen soldiers, police hurt in Yala double bomb attack

By The Nation

 

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YALA: -- Nineteen rangers, soldiers and police officers were injured on Thursday morning when insurgents in southern Yala province launched a double bomb attack.

 

Rangers patrolling Moo 1 village in Tambon Katong in Yaha were ambushed in the first attack at 9.26am and briefly exchanged gunfire with the assailants.

 

Two rangers – Sgt Thanet Puttho and Pvt Avudh Uppapong – were wounded.

 

Police, soldiers and bomb-disposal specialists arrived on the scene about 20 minutes later and were securing the area when a second bomb was detonated.

 

Fifteen more officials were wounded, four severely, and taken to hospital.

 

Another bomb had exploded at 7am in Kabang district, but only damaged a utility pole.

 

Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/breakingnews/30326651

 
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-- © Copyright The Nation 2017-09-14

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Just1Voice    13,282

Old trick.  Detonate one, wait for rescue and security personnel to show up, detonate second one.

 

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edwinchester    3,798

Same old story. Out on patrol in a war zone in the back of a pick-up.

Shame about all the newly ordered armoured personnel carriers being stationed in the north of Thailand.

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webfact    24,332

Roadside bombs wound 20, kill soldier in Thailand's troubled south

 

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Military personnel check the place where a roadside bomb blast occurred in the southern province Malay Muslim province of Yala, Thailand September 14, 2017. REUTERS/Surapan Boonthanom

 

BANGKOK (Reuters) - Roadside bombs planted by suspected Muslim insurgents in southern Thailand killed one soldier on Thursday and wounded 20 other people, most of them soldiers and police, security forces said.

 

The blasts occurred in Yala, one of the predominantly ethnic, Malay Muslim provinces in the deep south where a separatist insurgency has dragged on for decades, with more than 6,500 people killed since 2004 alone.

 

The first bomb did not result in any casualties, but the other two killed one soldier and wounded 18 soldiers and police and two villagers.

 

"It is believed to be the work of violent groups already creating incidents in the area," Pramote Prom-in, a spokesman for regional security forces, told Reuters.

 

As with most violence in Thailand's deep south, there was no claim of responsibility.

 

The insurgents are fighting for secession from mostly Buddhist Thailand. Until they were annexed in 1909, Thailand's three southernmost provinces of Pattani, Yala and Narathiwat were part of an independent Malay Muslim sultanate.

 

(Reporting by Surapan Boonthanom and Panarat Thepgumpanat; Writing by Patpicha Tanakasempipat; Editing by Simon Cameron-Moore)

 

 
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-- © Copyright Reuters 2017-09-14

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TheGhostWithin    547
8 hours ago, edwinchester said:

Same old story. Out on patrol in a war zone in the back of a pick-up.

Shame about all the newly ordered armoured personnel carriers being stationed in the north of Thailand.

Unfortunately this is not the same old story - I know, because I have multiple family members who were directly involved in this incident.

 

This area, to the north west of Ampur Mueng Yala, was previously generally a safer area. It is an area where Muslim and Buddhist generally live peacefully, with some Muslim people even doing business in Buddhist villages and vice versa.

 

For this reason, it was considered lower risk and the heavy equipment generally was not used.

 

This is a change for the worst for the area, for the entire populace. I hope that those that know who are responsible understand that this will fundamentally change their lifestyle and how they are allowed to live, and assist authorities in moving the offenders out of the area, or into a box.

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mikecha    40

Sorry to all involved why people think that killing and injury changes things i have never understand 

been self in many war zones Always shocking to see and hear 

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webfact    24,332

Soldiers fall prey to blasts

By THE NATION

 

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Several soldiers lie injured along a road in Yala province,|after a second bomb targeted security personnel responding to an earlier explosionyesterday. More than a dozen soldiers were injured and two subsequently died in hospital.

 

Two killed, over a dozen injured in 3 bomb attacks in Yala.


A FAMILIAR pattern of bomb attacks left two soldiers dead and injured 17 others in the southernmost province of Yala yesterday, a day after a joint working group for peace talks failed to reach common ground in the restive South.

 

The violence began at 8.50am when police received a call reporting a roadside explosion in a village in Yala’s Kabang district. No one was hurt in the incident.

 

Forty minutes later, military rangers and Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) officers were travelling to the scene on the road between Yala and Kabang districts when another bomb hidden along the roadside went off in Yaha district, injuring two security personnel.

 

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Security personnel then engaged in brief gunfire, although there were no confirmed reports of the assailants returning fire.

 

More soldiers were deployed to inspect the scene to look for the suspected militants when, at 10am, a third bomb went off in the area, this time injuring more than a dozen soldiers, two of whom later died in hospital.

 

Insurgents in the deep South have previously used the same tactic of detonating a bomb or attacking officers, and then setting off a follow-up bomb targeting security personnel responding to the original attack. 

 

Authorities said yesterday they were familiar with the tactic and they had blocked mobile phone signals to prevent remote-controlled detonation of additional explosives when they are investigating the scene of an attack. However, as of press time yesterday, there was still no information on how the third bomb had been triggered. 

 

The deep South has been rocked by renewed violence since 2004, with more than 6,800 people having been killed in the predominantly Muslim region, while authorities in Bangkok have struggled to contain the violence and restore peace.

 

Successive Thai governments in recent years have failed in several attempts to establish peace talks with insurgents, largely in part because no single specific group has claimed responsibility for the violence. Several groups have surfaced under different names to engage in dialogue with officials, but none of them have appeared to represent the militants on the ground. Current negotiations are proceeding with a group formed in 2015 under the name of MARA Patani, which claims to be an umbrella organisation of insurgents, but peace talks with authorities have not yielded any results so far.

 

A joint working group of MARA Patani and Thai government representatives held meetings in Malaysia between Monday and Wednesday, but they failed again to reach an agreement about setting up so-called “safety zones” in the deep South, a source said, citing different approaches.

 

The Thai government wanted to name specific locations as safety zones, while MARA Patani preferred to discuss the working procedures that would be applied in the zones, the source said.

 

Fourth Army Region commander Lt-General Piyawat Nakwanich admitted that talks this week had failed to reach common ground, but added that both sides would “never give up” and would continue their dialogue in the future. 

 

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Conflict observers interpreted the bombs yesterday as a message opposing the idea of safety zones, and a signal that insurgents on the ground did not recognise the MARA Patani leadership.

 

Meanwhile, Piyawat led a Thai delegation to meet his Malaysian counterpart, Lt-General Azizan bin MD Delin, in Penang yesterday for the 106th meeting of the Border Regional Committee to discuss security matters along the shared border.

 

Topics of discussion included joint patrols, disaster management, fighting narcotics trafficking, combating smuggling and, notably, dual-nationality citizens, who might be involved in insurgency activities. 

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Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/national/30326710

 
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-- © Copyright The Nation 2017-09-15

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tracker1    2,125

It appears the ony protection these Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) officers have is a flack jacket and a helmet Hmmmmmm

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Happyman58    396

Dont care if they are soldiers or civilians They are all still Human beings I hope this makes Thailand more determined to get these so called muslim extremists and never give into them Why cant they accept they are part of Thailand

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TheGhostWithin    547
20 minutes ago, Happyman58 said:

Dont care if they are soldiers or civilians They are all still Human beings I hope this makes Thailand more determined to get these so called muslim extremists and never give into them Why cant they accept they are part of Thailand

Most of these people are not Thai, they come accross the border in the jungle from Malaysia, they stay a while and build a pool of supporters behind the closed doors of villages sympathetic to the idea of the establishment of a caliphate or in many cases appreciative of the income provided by the drugs they traffic, they do their attacks and are quickly back into Malaysia, and sometimes on to Indonesia.

 

The southern civil forces deserve long range drones which can fly at higher altitudes, and monitor locations both immediately after, but more importantly for long periods beyond an incident. This would enable not only the searching of an area after an attack, but for the drones to be launched from the Police stations and Army barracks (they are currently carried to the locations) and reaching the site often faster than backup. It would enable smart people to identify potential offenders (using the methods described following) and have the location of their homes or their families homes monitored for days after events to identify trafficking of weapons and/or movement of insurgents. This would tell the Army when to pounce, reducing ongoing risk to personnel, many of which have families outside of the south, and do not want to be there but are posted there as part of compulsory cadet service.

 

The Thai Military need to better screen and record movements of individuals, in an extremely thorough manner. They need better intelligence, to know where people actually live and who they associate with. They need well trained analysts to build a clear picture of the networks of people in the area, so that when things go bad and they identify an attacker or potential attacker they have multiple doors to knock on.

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edwinchester    3,798
8 hours ago, TheGhostWithin said:

Unfortunately this is not the same old story - I know, because I have multiple family members who were directly involved in this incident.

 

This area, to the north west of Ampur Mueng Yala, was previously generally a safer area. It is an area where Muslim and Buddhist generally live peacefully, with some Muslim people even doing business in Buddhist villages and vice versa.

 

For this reason, it was considered lower risk and the heavy equipment generally was not used.

 

This is a change for the worst for the area, for the entire populace. I hope that those that know who are responsible understand that this will fundamentally change their lifestyle and how they are allowed to live, and assist authorities in moving the offenders out of the area, or into a box.

Thanks for taking the time to reply and I hope your family members are not too badly injured and recover quickly.

Just basing my reply on the spokesman quote, below, which suggested the area was already subject to violence.

 

"It is believed to be the work of violent groups already creating incidents in the area," Pramote Prom-in, a spokesman for regional security forces, told Reuters.

 

Being from the UK and having had family members serving in the Northern Ireland troubles, protection of the security forces on the ground is a subject close to my heart.

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phuketrichard    2,459

this will never end till the goverment gives admits there is something wrong. you cant fight a battle against people in an area that ur (  the military ) not accepted. Look at Afghanistan, Vietnam and on and on.

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Happyman58    396
24 minutes ago, TheGhostWithin said:

Most of these people are not Thai, they come accross the border in the jungle from Malaysia, they stay a while and build a pool of supporters behind the closed doors of villages sympathetic to the idea of the establishment of a caliphate or in many cases appreciative of the income provided by the drugs they traffic, they do their attacks and are quickly back into Malaysia, and sometimes on to Indonesia.

 

The southern civil forces deserve long range drones which can fly at higher altitudes, and monitor locations both immediately after, but more importantly for long periods beyond an incident. This would enable not only the searching of an area after an attack, but for the drones to be launched from the Police stations and Army barracks (they are currently carried to the locations) and reaching the site often faster than backup. It would enable smart people to identify potential offenders (using the methods described following) and have the location of their homes or their families homes monitored for days after events to identify trafficking of weapons and/or movement of insurgents. This would tell the Army when to pounce, reducing ongoing risk to personnel, many of which have families outside of the south, and do not want to be there but are posted there as part of compulsory cadet service.

 

The Thai Military need to better screen and record movements of individuals, in an extremely thorough manner. They need better intelligence, to know where people actually live and who they associate with. They need well trained analysts to build a clear picture of the networks of people in the area, so that when things go bad and they identify an attacker or potential attacker they have multiple doors to knock on.

Yes you so right but that takes extra money and the government spent there money on useless subs Soldiers doing there duty are not supported by there government and die

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BANGKOK 21 September 2017 06:51
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