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Why Buddhism is True

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Not really. A practising Buddhist would teach others how to put on the rubber sandals.

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19 minutes ago, camerata said:

Not really. A practising Buddhist would teach others how to put on the rubber sandals.

And if the others cannot afford rubber sandals?

I suppose that a practising good buddhist would then possibly make merrit and donate, but he would not try to change the system that is responsible for the others not being able to afford rubber sandals.

 

I believe western philosophy has half the answer, buddhism has the other half.

 

A very very small number of westerners see the shortcomings of western philosophies, but are any buddhists aware of the shortcomings of their philosophy?

 

 

 

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Metaphors are rarely perfect. In this case the rubber sandals represent mental cultivation, so there is no cost and it is available to all.

 

The Buddha's teachings are available to all. If I lose a leg in an accident there is nothing I can do to regain my former physical wholeness, but there is a lot I can do (using the Dhamma) to deal with the resulting mental anguish.

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3 hours ago, camerata said:

Metaphors are rarely perfect. In this case the rubber sandals represent mental cultivation, so there is no cost and it is available to all.

 

The Buddha's teachings are available to all. If I lose a leg in an accident there is nothing I can do to regain my former physical wholeness, but there is a lot I can do (using the Dhamma) to deal with the resulting mental anguish.

What you say is true.

If you lose a leg, buddhism surely can help with the mental anguish.

Being able to accept the inevitable, the unchangeable is a most usefull part of buddhist philosophy.

 

But would it not be helpfull too,  to have a proper (affordable for all) health care system as well?

A prosthetic leg? Paid for by the lucky taxpayer (lucky for not needing an artificial leg).

The rich USA shows us how the (non) existence of such a system is based on  a (western) philosophical choice.

 

Again your example seems to prove my point of needing a combination of western and buddhist philosophies.

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I tend to agree with 'oldhippy'. We have the marvelous opportunity in the modern era to get 'the best of both worlds'.

 

We can potentially appreciate and learn from the wise teachings of the Buddha, whilst also taking advantage of the benefits of modern science and technology.

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The author of the book has written an article, Is Mindfulness Meditation BS? :tongue:

 

A couple of quotes:

 

" It was a very strange thing to have an unpleasant feeling cease to be unpleasant without it really going away. "

 

" The not-self experience isn’t strictly binary. You don’t have to think of it as a threshold that you either manage to finally cross, to transformative effect, or forever fall short of, getting no edification whatsoever. As strange as it may sound, you can, with even a fairly modest daily meditation practice, experience a little bit of not-self. "

 

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I don't think Buddhism has an anthropomorphized devil as with the Christian version. Often things in ancient texts are said in parables, the initiated will take away one meaning and the masses another, similar to the older ME philosophies such as Chaldean, Egyptian or Zoroastrian. And no, I'm no initiate. :smile:

 

Regarding the Rohingha in Burma, there may be more to that story than what is reported as training camps for them have been identified in ME...do the math.

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I got sober in 1984 via AA. It was suggested that you get a Power greater than yourself. I was never comfortable with Christianity so Buddhism won by default & its principles were easy to accept.

Magnificent positive changes have occurred to me since. 

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13 minutes ago, Rancid said:

I don't think Buddhism has an anthropomorphized devil as with the Christian version. Often things in ancient texts are said in parables, the initiated will take away one meaning and the masses another, similar to the older ME philosophies such as Chaldean, Egyptian or Zoroastrian. And no, I'm no initiate. :smile:

 

Regarding the Rohingha in Burma, there may be more to that story than what is reported as training camps for them have been identified in ME...do the math.

QUOTE: I don't think Buddhism has an anthropomorphized devil as with the Christian version. Often things in ancient texts are said in parables, the initiated will take away one meaning and the masses another,

 

And are the initiated trying to explain the true meaning to the masses, or are they too occupied with their own private enlightenment?

 

QUOTE: Regarding the Rohingha in Burma, there may be more to that story than what is reported as training camps for them have been identified in ME.

 

All 500.000 refugees go to training camps in the ME? The entire world - except China - has it wrong?

 

The theory of buddhism is one thing (inspiring but not the ultimate answer).

The reality of buddhism is another thing (sometimes inspiring, but often as ugly as all other theories when put into practice).

 

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38 minutes ago, superglue said:

I got sober in 1984 via AA. It was suggested that you get a Power greater than yourself. I was never comfortable with Christianity so Buddhism won by default & its principles were easy to accept.

Magnificent positive changes have occurred to me since. 

First of all: congratulations!

 

What you say about that Power you found in / thanks to buddhism sounds great - but I have read the exact same thing being claimed by others, based on christianity, and even by atheists.

That suggests that this Power is not related to any religion or philosophy.

What could then be the nature of this Power?

Do you have any suggestions? What exactly helped you cross the line?

 

 

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I'll  Go along with Dr Suzuki on this.

 

The more you talk about it and attempt to analyse it , the further you move away from it. The thicker the book ,the less it contains .

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Oldhippy

My mission is NOT to try to convince you.

For me, spirituality is DYNAMIC.

Initially, the God concept was unacceptable to me.

Now it is a matter of utilizing both the Christian God & the principles of Buddhism.

 

TOMORROW?

Edited by superglue

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2 hours ago, superglue said:

Oldhippy

My mission is NOT to try to convince you.

For me, spirituality is DYNAMIC.

Initially, the God concept was unacceptable to me.

Now it is a matter of utilizing both the Christian God & the principles of Buddhism.

 

TOMORROW?

superglue,

I did not feel challenged, nor did I try to challenge you, but maybe I gave that impression - English is not my first language.

I just want to learn from others' experiences, at 66 I am still looking for answers.

Yes, I found some answers, but abandoned them...

At the risk of being concidered a troll or a weirdo, may I say that the best answer I found so far was Michael Palin in Monty Pythons Meaning of Life: Life is short and has no meaning, so enjoy it while it lasts, and don't bugger it up for others.

 

 

 

 

 

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oldhippy

The principles of Buddhism are such that suffering continues until one attains enlightenment.

As such rebirth is part of the process.

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1 hour ago, superglue said:

oldhippy

The principles of Buddhism are such that suffering continues until one attains enlightenment.

As such rebirth is part of the process.

Literal rebirth in your opinion, or is this a metaphor?

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