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BANGKOK 14 December 2018 12:38
webfact

Thai fishing fleet fights for survival amid EU pressure

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The Thai fishing industry does not really have a choice, and it has little to do with complying with EU regulations. If the don't adapt, they will simply fish themselves out of existence, simple as that. The EU is merely trying to steer them in the right direction, as an older brother should.

In the end it's up to the Thai, though. If they want to keep on behaving like belligerent children without a thought for future generations, so be it. Very soon it will not be profitable anymore since stocks will have been depleted to a level where 90 % of the industry will have to stop.

We had a similar scare in the 80ties in western Europe, and had to do a lot of growing up in a very short time - which was very painful for the industry. Now, finally, there is sustainable fishing - at a price . I wish the same for our little brown brothers.

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" Back in 1961, fishermen in the Gulf of Thailand—the body of water between Thailand and Vietnam—caught around 300 kilograms (661 pounds) of fish in an hour. By 2011, they were catching just 25 kilos—around a 90% reduction (pdf, p.8). EJF reports that on the Andaman Sea—off the western coast of Thailand—the catch per hour dropped to 41 kg in 2011, down from around 240 kg in 1961. "

 

Most of the Thai fisherman must look for other jobs.  Not even the measurements to avoid IUU fishing are sufficient, as you can see here. The appertaining article: https://qz.com/183773/in-thailand-the-cost-of-overfishing-is-trafficked-human-beings/

thai-dept-cpue.png

Edited by fxe1200
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5 hours ago, wakeupplease said:

“We realise now this is all just a trade barrier by the EU, because all of the fishing vessels in Thailand are [following the law], but they still keep the yellow card for Thailand.” 

 

its not actually its in the interests of the country's future to police the waters Police being the non active word, when you have exhausted stocks what will you catch in the future? plastic bags probably.

 

Trade barrier there is one country very good at doing that right here right now.

 

It may well be in the interests of sustainable fishing that will benefit future generations. But the advantage to the EU to use this as a trade barrier, to make imports less competitive is hardly likely to have escaped their notice, now is it?

 

And when it comes to policing their own over fishing, rule breaking, fleets of some member countries, they aren't too hot. 

 

The Irish and Royal Navies are always catching EU member state illegal fishing boats, Spanish and Dutch in particular.

 

Thailand would be wise to manage it's fishing fleets, fishing grounds, and fish stocks carefully. But the EU ain't whiter than white and lecture others with hypocrisy.

Edited by Baerboxer

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When trawlers with their nets rape the sea of unreplenishable stocks, then the time comes where no one makes a living anymore.  Simple and obvious

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Not long ago went to Ko Surin National Park snorkeling the Coral Reefs. On the day i arrived there was a fishing trawler fishing around the Island. National park wardens told us they were Illegally fishing and not to go near them as they were dangerous. After 4 days the Coast Guards finally showed up to move them on. Not sure what happened after that probably 500 B fine. So no sympathy from me at all they deserve it.

Cheers

Fishing-boat-1.jpg

fishing-boat2.jpg

fishingboat3.jpg

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3 hours ago, shillhater said:

why is that man measuring the size of the bait?

Some of it could be undersize bait. 

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2 hours ago, Baerboxer said:

 

It may well be in the interests of sustainable fishing that will benefit future generations. But the advantage to the EU to use this as a trade barrier, to make imports less competitive is hardly likely to have escaped their notice, now is it?

 

And when it comes to policing their own over fishing, rule breaking, fleets of some member countries, they aren't too hot. 

 

The Irish and Royal Navies are always catching EU member state illegal fishing boats, Spanish and Dutch in particular.

 

Thailand would be wise to manage it's fishing fleets, fishing grounds, and fish stocks carefully. But the EU ain't whiter than white and lecture others with hypocrisy.

True, but the Spanish and Dutch don't use slaves do they?

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The European fishing industry collapsed 40 years ago due to over fishing. The fishermen fought tooth and nail against the new regulations, blaming everybody but themselves. Enforcing the new regulations wasn't easy, I know, i was part of MAFF's (now DEFRA) fisheries surveillance unit in the 80's. But without it the fishing industry would have collapsed nearly completely. Thailand's industry has only kept going by slashing costs (i.e. slave labour) and trying to catch everything. If they accept proper regulations and enforcement catches could return to the levels of 50 years ago, but i cannot see that happening anytime soon with the Thai attitude that rules are there to be broken. Maybe in 20 years they will get it. But fishermen need a lot of education about WHY you need it. EU pressure will help, as long as the EU publicises WHY. Better facilities for the crew aren't really the answer, pointless unless you make fishing viable again.

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I was on fishery patrol with the CDN navy and we use to verify the position of floating buoye and verifying the fishing vessel identification and some time going on board to verify the catch.

Now the atlantic ocean is almost out of cod fish and along with lobster and all.

So now everything is imported from Asia or other close by country and the cost of fish at the market is expensive.

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