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How to Get Rid of Pests and Bugs the Buddhist Way

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Some good tips in this article...

 

How to Get Rid of Pests and Bugs the Buddhist Way

 

Kill that impulse! Here are compassionate Buddhist solutions for your favorite pests, without killing them.

 

By Allan Badiner

 

Ants

If you have an ant infestation, use your vacuum to quickly get rid of the invaders, and then immediately empty the vacuum bag in the outdoor compost pile or at some distance from your house.

 

Do not use ant bait, or poison sprays like Raid that continue in the toxic waste stream from their point of manufacture to their ultimate destination in landfills or via runoff or sewage into our waterways and oceans.

 

It is important to quickly erase the scent trail that the ants have laid down. First, wash with soapy water and then use a citrus-based repellant, or spray countertops and affected areas with a mixture of juiced lemon, tea tree oil, grapefruit seed extract, and a little mint tea.

The key to ant control is cleanliness: wipe up food spills immediately, wipe down food preparation surfaces with soapy water, remove garbage frequently, clean food debris out of sinks, rinse well any dirty dishes left in the sink, and sweep and mop floors regularly.

 

Store the food most attractive to ants (honey, sugar, sweet liqueurs, cough syrup, etc.) in the fridge or in jars with rubber gaskets and lids that close with a metal clamp, or zip-lock bags. Unless the lid of a screw-top jar has a rubber seal, ants will follow the threads right into the jar. A few layers of waxed paper (not plastic wrap) between the jar and the lid, if screwed down tightly, will work well as a barrier. Transfer other foods, such as cookies, cereals, crackers, etc in paper boxes, to containers with tight-fitting lids or zip locks; and keep butter in the fridge. Paper and cardboard boxes are not ant-proof.

 

Full article at Tricycle.

 

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On 9/28/2017 at 11:19 AM, camerata said:

Some good tips in this article...

 

How to Get Rid of Pests and Bugs the Buddhist Way

 

Kill that impulse! Here are compassionate Buddhist solutions for your favorite pests, without killing them.

 

By Allan Badiner

 

Ants

If you have an ant infestation, use your vacuum to quickly get rid of the invaders, and then immediately empty the vacuum bag in the outdoor compost pile or at some distance from your house.

 

Do not use ant bait, or poison sprays like Raid that continue in the toxic waste stream from their point of manufacture to their ultimate destination in landfills or via runoff or sewage into our waterways and oceans.

 

It is important to quickly erase the scent trail that the ants have laid down. First, wash with soapy water and then use a citrus-based repellant, or spray countertops and affected areas with a mixture of juiced lemon, tea tree oil, grapefruit seed extract, and a little mint tea.

The key to ant control is cleanliness: wipe up food spills immediately, wipe down food preparation surfaces with soapy water, remove garbage frequently, clean food debris out of sinks, rinse well any dirty dishes left in the sink, and sweep and mop floors regularly.

 

Store the food most attractive to ants (honey, sugar, sweet liqueurs, cough syrup, etc.) in the fridge or in jars with rubber gaskets and lids that close with a metal clamp, or zip-lock bags. Unless the lid of a screw-top jar has a rubber seal, ants will follow the threads right into the jar. A few layers of waxed paper (not plastic wrap) between the jar and the lid, if screwed down tightly, will work well as a barrier. Transfer other foods, such as cookies, cereals, crackers, etc in paper boxes, to containers with tight-fitting lids or zip locks; and keep butter in the fridge. Paper and cardboard boxes are not ant-proof.

 

Full article at Tricycle.

 

 

Some Buddhists, like those in Thailand for example, have a simpler solution. Get someone else to do it. 

This is why you see all the abattoirs are owned and operated by Muslim folks. 

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I just "released" another rat yesterday on the road to Rayong...far away from my house, caught him in my workshop. Used one those metal traps that locks him inside it. What an exuberant feeling it is when letting him run off.

   The only way I knew before coming to Thailand was the "spring" trap that killed them off very quickly.

   It saddens me so much now when I see on here people actually boasting about killing snakes etc., that passes their path. I truely realize now that all living creatures have the same right to life as I myself have.

  Repeating again what I once heard a person say...."Every living creature is proof of God's existance".

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23 minutes ago, dotpoom said:

I just "released" another rat yesterday on the road to Rayong...far away from my house, caught him in my workshop. Used one those metal traps that locks him inside it. What an exuberant feeling it is when letting him run off.

   The only way I knew before coming to Thailand was the "spring" trap that killed them off very quickly.

   It saddens me so much now when I see on here people actually boasting about killing snakes etc., that passes their path. I truely realize now that all living creatures have the same right to life as I myself have.

  Repeating again what I once heard a person say...."Every living creature is proof of God's existance".

..just dont let em free near my joint.

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If anybody cares to read the original article, you will come upon this pearl of buddhist wisdom:

"If you have a problem with mice or rats, adopt some cats - the cats will do your dirty unbuddhistlike work for you."

 

OK OK the article did not use the exact same words, but still..... it advised to adopt cats to get rid of mice & rats.

 

In Nepal, buddhist villages employ a hindu butcher to kill their chickens, since it would be unbuddhist to kill living beings.

Meanwhile in Myanmar,.....

 

PS Are bacteria, microbes and virusses considered to be animals? Can a buddhist kill them?

 

It would be most interesting if one of our resident buddhist would reply to my post. Fat chance I guess.

 

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Centipedes eat cockroaches, ants, bed bugs, moths.

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Dealing with the small red ants that enter the house - disturb them blow on them, tap on whatever they are standing on, then go away. They usually get the message and clear out within minutes. Haven't killed an ant in many years.

 

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5 hours ago, oldhippy said:

 

PS Are bacteria, microbes and virusses considered to be animals? Can a buddhist kill them?

 

 

No, they aren't considered animals and aren't included in the precept on killing.

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16 hours ago, dotpoom said:

I just "released" another rat yesterday on the road to Rayong...far away from my house, caught him in my workshop. Used one those metal traps that locks him inside it. What an exuberant feeling it is when letting him run off.

   The only way I knew before coming to Thailand was the "spring" trap that killed them off very quickly.

   It saddens me so much now when I see on here people actually boasting about killing snakes etc., that passes their path. I truely realize now that all living creatures have the same right to life as I myself have.

  Repeating again what I once heard a person say...."Every living creature is proof of God's existance".

 

Unfortunately for you, the animal kingdom does not think along the same lines. Seems only humans have the ability to twist "beliefs" to suit their own purposes. 

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12 hours ago, amvet said:

Centipedes eat cockroaches, ants, bed bugs, moths.

but some of the SE Asian Centipedes are scary buggah's - poisonous as well, could kill a small child.

monstor Centipede - Vama Camp Sattahip Thld 1972 .jpeg

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On 10/2/2017 at 5:37 AM, oldhippy said:

PS Are bacteria, microbes and virusses considered to be animals? Can a buddhist kill them?

 

From Camerata:

No, they aren't considered animals and aren't included in the precept on killing.

 

This situation highlights the problem of strictly adhering to all the precepts of a religion that was founded many centuries ago when the general understanding of the environment around us, our biology, our planet and the universe, was so different or so limited compared with our modern scientific understanding.

 

The advantages and attraction of Buddhism (for me at least) is that some of the teachings, as in the Kalama Sutta, encourage an inquiring attitude in relation to what is good and beneficial for oneself and others.

 

As far as I'm aware, Buddhism is the only religion which includes within it's scriptures, the advice attributed to its founder that one should not accept something as true merely because it is stated in the scriptures, or claimed to be true by some authority or teacher, but one should use one's nous and investigate the claims from so-called teachers, or from scriptures, for oneself in order to understand for oneself how such teachings might be true, or false, as the case may be.

 

Now it's obvious that 2,500 years ago, during the life of the Buddha, there was no knowledge of bacteria, microbes and viruses. The microscope did not exist in those times. It would therefore be impossible for the original Buddhist precepts to even mention such life forms as bacteria and microbes.

 

The general Buddhist precept in this regard, is often described simplistically that we should not kill or harm any living creature, or sentient being. From Wikipedia:

 

"The prohibition on killing precept in Buddhist scriptures applies to all living beings, states Christopher Gowans, not just human beings. Bhikkhu Bodhi agrees, clarifying that the more accurate rendering of the Pali canon is a prohibition on "taking life of any sentient being", which includes human beings, animals, birds, insects but excludes plants because they are not considered sentient beings. Further, adds Bodhi, this precept refers to intentional killing, as well as any form of intentional harming or torturing any sentient being. This moral virtue in early Buddhist texts, both in context of harm or killing of animals and human beings, is similar to ahimsa precepts found in the texts particularly of Jainism as well as of Hinduism, and has been a subject of significant debate in various Buddhist traditions."

 

However, this situation is not either/or. We can't determine that a living organism, whether plant, animal, or microbe, is either completely sentient or completely not sentient. That would be dualism. The reality appears to be  that there's a continuum or broad spectrum of varying degrees of sentience among all forms of life, with Homo Sapiens at one end of the spectrum, with the highest degree of sentience, and the most primitive bacteria at the opposite end of the spectrum, with the lowest degree of sentience.

 

Plants are generally considered to be non-sentient. People who hug trees are considered by some, perhaps unjustifiably, to be crackpots.
However, modern science is gradually shedding more light on the situation. Plants are not as dumb as we might think. There's a lot going on in the plant world which fits to some degree the definition of sentience.

 

I recall many years ago when I became interested in the health benefits of organic produce, grown without the use of pesticides. When I investigating the issue for myself (in accordance with the advice of the Kalama Sutta  :smile: ) I came across some interesting scientific research which revealed that plants have their own defense mechanism when attacked by insects. The initial attack from an insect stimulates the plant to produce some type of poisonous or unpalatable chemical to deter further attacks from insects or herbivores.
The following paper provides the scientific details, for those who are interested.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3676838/

 

A more general, and more readable article on plant sentience is as follows.
https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-green-mind/201412/are-plants-entering-the-realm-the-sentient

 

For me, the big question here is, 'How can traditional Buddhism deal with these nuances of sentience, which were not apparent during the times of the Buddha?'

 

The answer can be found in the Buddhist principle of Moderation or the Middle Way. In other words, avoid extremes.
There would have been no doubt, during the times of the Buddha, that cows, fish, chickens, and so on, were sentient creatures that could suffer. Yet the Buddha did not prohibit monks from eating meat, or prohibit the layperson from killing animals for food. I suspect that the Buddha intuitively understood that life could not exist without prey and predator.

 

I interpret the Buddha's message here as, 'Do not kill or harm sentient creatures unnecessarily, or wantonly, or without compassionate regard to their suffering.'

 

It is possible to kill animals humanely.

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BANGKOK 12 December 2017 09:26
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