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torrzent

how to say "lightly cooked" morning glory in thai

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How to tell the cook to lightly cook a pak boon fai daeng.  Many places I try overcook it and it becomes mushy.  Prefer the vegetable to be a bit less mushy.

I used to know the word but forgot.

 

Thanks

Edited by torrzent

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How to tell the cook to lightly cook a pak boon fai daeng.  Many places I try overcook it and it becomes mushy.  Prefer the vegetable to be a bit less mushy.
I used to know the word but forgot.
 
Thanks
My transliteration is not the best but, ... 'my sup mark' don't cook it alot.

Khun Krap, pak boon fai daeng my sup mark, krapon krup.

Sir, don't cook my stuff too much, thank you.

Or ' sup niknoy'.

Probably the first time at this place say that, then watch them and say when cooked enough, and next time it will be fine.

Cooked a lot, and not cooked a lot is subjective, so watching them and telling them the first time would be the way to go.

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I am reliably informed that it is ผักปุ้งพัดพอสลด .
English cookery is famous for boiling to the point of disintegration but Thais like a bit of ‘bite’ and it is becoming the fashion in England too so probably what you want.
If you care to look up สลด you will come upon wilt, the appearance of something which is no longer alive a fresh, wilted perhaps.
Guess what สลดใจ means.



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All fails so far :whistling: Try this.

 

Yaa pad naan krup, mai ow pak nim nim

 

อย่าผัดนานครับ, ไม่เอาผักนิ่มนิ่ม

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6 hours ago, carlyai said:

My transliteration is not the best but, ... 'my sup mark' don't cook it alot.

Khun Krap, pak boon fai daeng my sup mark, krapon krup.

Sir, don't cook my stuff too much, thank you.

Or ' sup niknoy'.

Probably the first time at this place say that, then watch them and say when cooked enough, and next time it will be fine.

Cooked a lot, and not cooked a lot is subjective, so watching them and telling them the first time would be the way to go.

Sent from my SM-J700F using Tapatalk
 

 

 

I would go with "sook nit noy" or could try "mai sook (mak)"

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What do you mean by ‘failed’? You have given an instruction when a descriptive noun was asked for.


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To explain, I misspelled ผัด the method of cooking, I would like to call that a typo but most would know better!

'lightly cooked' was asked for and the short way of saying that when it applies to greens is ผัดพอสลด. Thai needs the noun followed by the adjective.

When we say "melts in the mouth" we mean something desirable, I remember a Thai in UK describing cauliflower thus but meaning, not at all desirable. ยุ่ย เปื้อย or เปื้อยยุ่ย could be applied to greens in this case.

 

 

 

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any chance of spelling out with alphabet those thai expressions, as google translate doesn't seem to do it

 

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I am reliably informed that it is ผักปุ้งพัดพอสลด .
English cookery is famous for boiling to the point of disintegration but Thais like a bit of ‘bite’ and it is becoming the fashion in England too so probably what you want.
If you care to look up สลด you will come upon wilt, the appearance of something which is no longer alive a fresh, wilted perhaps.
Guess what สลดใจ means.



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Need for Viagra?

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All fails so far :whistling: Try this.
 
Yaa pad naan krup, mai ow pak nim nim
 
อย่าผัดนานครับ, ไม่เอาผักนิ่มนิ่ม
By the time all the tones were sorted out and the message understood, the bluddy thing would be burnt.
Im a teacher...0/10 in purple pen (don't want to offend you). And...good try, keep up the good work

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On 11/2/2017 at 1:54 PM, carlyai said:

My transliteration is not the best but, ... 'my sup mark' don't cook it alot.

Khun Krap, pak boon fai daeng my sup mark, krapon krup.

Sir, don't cook my stuff too much, thank you.

Or ' sup niknoy'.

SUK ......... ends in a 'K' sound. สุก (cooked)

NITnoy ........ has a 'T' sound.นิดน้อย (little bit)

 

 

Edited by MaeJoMTB

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SUK ......... ends in a 'K' sound. สุก (cooked)
NITnoy ........ has a 'T' sound.นิดน้อย (little bit)
 
 
Yes you're right.

That NIT in NITnoy, isn't that a final dor dek? Does that dor dek change to a tor tahan?

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BANGKOK 18 November 2017 08:12
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