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When exactly will Britain leave the EU? UK parliament debates

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When exactly will Britain leave the EU? UK parliament debates

By Elizabeth Piper

 

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Anti-Brexit protesters wave EU and Union flags outside the Houses of Parliament in London, Britain, November 14, 2017. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls

 

LONDON (Reuters) - When exactly will Britain leave the European Union?

 

Parliament started hours of debate on Tuesday by arguing over when the two-year negotiating period for Brexit should end and whether there should be a fixed time at all.

 

It was just the first day of what promises to be a lengthy set of debates in parliament on Prime Minister Theresa May's blueprint for leaving the EU - debates that will challenge her diminished authority and could force changes to her Brexit plan.

 

Her absence on Tuesday on another engagement suggested she was not unduly worried by the initial discussion.

 

But the debate's ill-tempered tone showed the level of anger in a parliament emboldened since May lost her Conservative Party's majority in a June election and was forced to garner the support of a small Northern Irish party to be able to pass legislation.

 

With catcalls, sarcastic jokes and jeers being bandied about - not just between the two main parties, as is the custom, but often within them - some lawmakers took issue with the government's plans to quit the EU at 11:00 p.m. on March 29.

 

One, from the opposition Labour Party, said Britain should leave the EU on March 30, 2019, preferring midnight British time to the government's proposal to leave an hour earlier - which would be midnight in Brussels.

 

That was determined to be "technically deficient" by the government minister on the opposite side of the House of Commons, who said any amendment trying to move the exit date and time threatened to push Britain into "legal chaos" if the country's statute book were not in order when it leaves.

 

"As a responsible government we must be ready to exit without a deal, even though we expect to conclude a deep and special partnership (with the EU)," he told parliament.

 

DIVISIONS EXPOSED

 

Behind the debate is the fear of pro-Brexit lawmakers that Britain may never leave the EU, and of pro-EU lawmakers who fear that by setting any firm date, Britain will have no flexibility in talks with the bloc and might end up with no deal.

 

Another debate later on Tuesday will look at the interpretation of EU law.

 

The debates go to the heart of what parliament calls "one of the largest legislative projects ever undertaken in the UK".

 

The process of transposing EU law into British law could not only reopen the divisions exposed when Britons voted 52-48 percent to quit the EU on June 23 last year, but also further undermine May's already fragile authority.

 

May has lost two ministers to scandals and her foreign minister, Boris Johnson, is facing calls to resign over remarks he made about a jailed aid worker in Iran. The Sunday Times has reported that 40 Conservatives support a vote on no-confidence.

 

The prime minister has tried to ease tensions by offering lawmakers some concessions on the bill, but still faces more divisive debates which could go against her.

 

(Additional reporting by Andrew MacAskill, Editing by William Maclean)

 
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-- © Copyright Reuters 2017-11-15

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20 minutes ago, webfact said:

Britons voted 52-48 percent to quit the EU

I wonder how that number would be today? :cheesy:

The answer when Britain will leave the EU is easy. That´s when incompetence is replaced by professionalism. (Easy explaination: Not for a while!) :cheesy:

  • Haha 1

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4 hours ago, Get Real said:

I wonder how that number would be today? :cheesy:

The answer when Britain will leave the EU is easy. That´s when incompetence is replaced by professionalism. (Easy explaination: Not for a while!) :cheesy:

 

It would certainly not be 60/40 to leave.

 

In case anyone had forgotten that was the proportion that Farage insisted would be required to constitute a valid decision.

 

Don't hear much about that proportion from him, or his allies, now.

 

 

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... even though we expect to conclude a deep and special partnership (with the EU)," he told parliament.

 

Until march 2019?

That is technically impossible. The development of tailor-made trade agreements lasts 7-10 years.

EU-Canada needed 8 years.

EU-Japan needed also around 8 Years. 

Another problem is the lack of UK-based trade experts. 

In the past, Brussels has developed trade agreements for the EU. For example, the eu-canada agreement involved 800 experts on the EU side and 600 on the canadian side

The UK has currently not enough of these professionals.

 

The uk has decided on the fixed expiration date actually the hard brexit.

 

instead of constantly selling rosy air, the population should be given clear information.But I fear the government does not recognize the consequences of its decisions.

 

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6 minutes ago, Dagnabbit said:

It takes the EU 7 years for a trade deal...

Which is one of the reasons the UK voted leave...

Sent from my SM-A720F using Tapatalk
 

I think Nigeria is faster if you grease the right hands.

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2 hours ago, oilinki said:

With all the Russian meddling with the referendum, it might be worth to redo the vote?

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/nov/14/how-400-russia-run-fake-accounts-posted-bogus-brexit-tweets?CMP=share_btn_tw

 

That could lead the way for USA to also redo their elections. 

 

<deleted>! 

 

I agree the Referendum as a cock of shit - badly organized and implemented and with lies replacing facts and information.

 

But the Russians - this is getting too ridiculous. The US POTUS election, the Brexit referendum, French presidential election, German election and on and on.

 

Seems fashionable now to blame the Russians for any election result someone doesn't like. They must be light years ahead of the rest of the world in hacking and manipulating computer systems and social media - yeah right.

 

They should old a new referendum btw. Not because someone thinks the Russians influenced things with a few tweets. But because the mood in the British electorate is considerably different now the extent of lies told by their politicians about Brexit and Remain are becoming clear. The Tory government of the weak May like to spout about the "will of the people". And that will might well have changed.

Edited by Baerboxer

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7 hours ago, billd766 said:

Perhaps I am a little foolish but I was under the impression that the MPs in the UK were elected by the people and to serve the people of the UK.

 

NOT to faff around and have no real idea of what to do.

 

Whatever happens between now and Brexit day will happen but any wise MP should have his/her ear closely aligned to the constiuency as there will be another election in the UK in several years time. Plenty of time for the electorate to think on their MPs performance between elections.

 

It doesn't matter if they are Labour or Conservative, it will be their performance during this parliament that will count.

 

Also, if I were Nigel Farage I would be quietly kicking the arrrse of the UKIP party in preparation.

You clearly have NO idea how representative democracy is supposed to work

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If EU would give a one time possibility to UK to cancel the Brexit due Russian meddling with the election, would the people of UK take it today?

 

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BANGKOK 21 November 2017 00:15
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