Jump to content
Thailand Visa Forum by Thai Visa | The Nation
mikey88

Heart attack....best hospital..?

Recommended Posts

18 hours ago, hansnl said:

Why do you assume state hospitals don't have the necessary machines and the private hospitals have?

I assure you a good doctor is a better thing as a lot of machines and no cardio specialist.

I dare to say the medical staff in the bigger state hospitals are very well versed in many kinds of emergencies simply because the number of cases is much greater bringing much more experience to the ER staff.

One of the things is working under pressure.

Correct. The new I.C.U. at the state hospital in Udon Thani hospital has all the kit. The staff there brought back a dead one injured in a motor bike accident. My adopted daughter was in the next bed. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When we talk about State Hospital we're talking about all government hospitals in Thailand, many of which can be very good The largest state hospitals are the District Hospitals which broadly follow the lines of the provinces in many cases although in some examples a large District Hospital will cover multiple provinces, case in point Chiang Mai Maharaj/Suandok which also covers Chiang Rai province. Arguably, Mahraj/Suandok is the best hospital in the North. 

 

But there are other types and sizes of government hospitals, every amphur has one it seems but they are not equipped or staffed to the same standard as the District hospital and many don't even have operating capabilities let alone permanent specialists on staff. There's then another layer of state hospitals, larger but still not to the size or capability of District hospitals but able to treat a greater range of ailments than the small local hospital. 

 

So yes, you will find all the technology and specialists you need in the District hospital, you may find it in some of the intermediate range government hospitals but you're unlikely to find much of it in the smaller amphur hospital.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, ThaiPauly said:

Actually I think it's good to know things like this.

 

If you live in Hang Dong ,CM Ram or Siripat are about the same distance so it's worth knowing which one is gonna give you a better chance of survival.

 

But a hospital like Klaimoor can't handle heart attacks, would send you to Ram.....is what happened to me 5 or 6 years ago

I live in Hang Dong and the closest hospital was the government hospital when I had an intestinal blockage and I was very happy with the treatment not sure what they are like for heart problems.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks to everybody who has helped me....greatly appreciated.

My old friend died last year as I said before. He had a heart attack from blocked arteries and got to hospital pretty quickly but did not have the balloon angioplasty.

Whether that was because the hospital was not equipped to do it (it was in the middle of the night) or it was not advised or whatever....I couldn’t get to the bottom of it..

But he died anyway.

Hence the pre planning.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎11‎/‎17‎/‎2017 at 9:44 AM, elektrified said:

Come on.......Aspirin (ASA) is the most common drug in the world and can be found in any pharmacy in the world.

LOL.

Soluble asprin, which I needed, is non existent.

Edited by thaibeachlovers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, thaibeachlovers said:

LOL.

Try finding it in a normal hole in the wall Thai "pharmacy", and soluble asprin, which I needed, is non existent.

I'm sure I could find it anywhere - and I have. Since when is Aspirin non-soluble?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎11‎/‎16‎/‎2017 at 10:20 PM, NancyL said:

 

 

And when you consider that many of the users of ThaiVisa forum are older white men, then planning for a heart attack is definitely a worthwhile activity.

 

One way to both plan and take better care of yourself would be to have a health care check-up at one of the hospitals mentioned -- Bangkok Hospital, Chiang Mai Ram, Sripat.  That way, you may learn if you should adjust your diet, lose weight, cut back on alcohol to improve "your numbers" of cholestrol, blood pressure and blood sugar.  Also, your "numbers" will be on file with your chosen hospital, so that if you're brought in by ambulance during a crisis, then the hospital will have records of what you were like when you were "healthy". 

Speaking as an older white man, to return my body to the resemblance of a Greek god that it used to be many decades ago I would have to give up so much of what I like that while I might live a few more years, I would enjoy it not a jot.

Personally, if I can have a few more years of "fun", I'll happily have a heart attack take me away before I'm condemned to the living hell of a rest home to exist for years and years and years as a semi vegetable stuck in front of day time tv every day till a welcome death.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, elektrified said:

 Since when is Aspirin non-soluble?

When it's sold in a Thai pharmacy.

 

If you know where I can get soluble asprin in Chiang Mai, please tell me where.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, Bill Miller said:

Long post here, but if you have not had a heart attack it maybe useful and/or interesting.
Been there, done that. Kept me going, along with some chest thumping, until an ambulance arrived. First cardiac "episode".
Second time just stopped my cardio walk, and the galloping chest subsided after a few minutes of just standing and "mindful breathing". Made an appointment with a cardio guy who stopped me after about 45 seconds on the treadmill. "You flunk the test." Balloon angioplasty for that one.
Episode three. Awakened at 03:00 by crushing chest pain. Knew what it was by this time, having read quite a bit.
Got up, dressed, and took the lift down to the casino hotel lobby. Told the young man "Please get some help. I am having a heart attack". He called a security guy who knew how to handle it.
My sisters, nurses. bitched me out for this,...  "Why didn't you call from your room? Idiot!" Hey, it's a guy thing.
Wound up at the Pueblo clinic... about like a provincial clinic here, but with fresh paint.
Paramedic on duty was great. Gave me aspirin to chew, took vitals and did some sort of blood test... "Yep, you're having an MI. Relax, we'll get you taken care of."
First helicopter ride outside of the Army. Attendant was great.. gave me something with the IV that made everything sort of warm and cozy, and helped me semi sit so I could enjoy the visuals of the ride.
Albuquerque Heart Hospital took pretty good care, installing one stent and putting me on a drug regimen. A couple of years later a cardiologist,episode four, after performing an angiogram asked why I had not had more stents installed at the time, as if anybody discussed the details or offered a choice.
#4, "Well, no choice now. Sending you down to the Valley for bypass surgery". "Can it wait until my Medicare takes effect in 7 months?" "20% chance I can keep you alive that long". "Lets go!"
Couple of days later began an excruciating recovery process, but new plumbing installed and a twenty year warranty, 5555.
So, returning to the OP subject, most ERs SHOULD have interventional capacity to get one stabilized pending transpo to a decent cardio facility.
Doing the right thing asking.

Were you ever a smoker?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, Kelsall said:

Were you ever a smoker?

Yes I was... forty years or so of non filtered cigarettes.
The first full blown MI, #3 in my essay, I quit with little effort. It was scary.
I often show off my chest scar to people I see puffing away.
I doubt it helps in the short term, but similar stuff is what enabled me to do it when the writing was on the wall.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some of the old The Pub users may remember George who had had a heart attack and survived.

Feeling ill one day he called a friend and was taken to RAM where it was found he was having, as he suspected, a second Heart Attack.

 

john

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎11‎/‎17‎/‎2017 at 7:33 PM, Bill Miller said:


Episode three. Awakened at 03:00 by crushing chest pain. Knew what it was by this time, having read quite a bit.

So, returning to the OP subject, most ERs SHOULD have interventional capacity to get one stabilized pending transpo to a decent cardio facility.
Doing the right thing asking.

Should also know that left shoulder tip pain is a good sign in conjunction with chest pain of a heart attack.

I sometimes get severe chest pain, which could be several reasons, but no shoulder pain so far, so ignore and they go away eventually. If I didn't know about the shoulder pain I'd be off to the hospital for nothing.

 

NB, the above is MY experience- don't blame me if it's different for you. Just giving my 2 bob's worth.

 

I wouldn't EXPECT a Thai ER to have any sort of capacity like a US one, just as the ambulances sometimes have no resuscitation gear.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Re doing CPR on someone had a heart attack, and did CPR training back when breaths were a standard part of it, the routine is different now.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, thaibeachlovers said:

Should also know that left shoulder tip pain is a good sign in conjunction with chest pain of a heart attack.

I sometimes get severe chest pain, which could be several reasons, but no shoulder pain so far, so ignore and they go away eventually. If I didn't know about the shoulder pain I'd be off to the hospital for nothing.

 

NB, the above is MY experience- don't blame me if it's different for you. Just giving my 2 bob's worth.

 

I wouldn't EXPECT a Thai ER to have any sort of capacity like a US one, just as the ambulances sometimes have no resuscitation gear.

I would consult with a cardiologist. Chest pain is not a good sign, with or without radiating shoulder, arm, hand, etc. pain.
I have been prescribed isosorbide dinitrate, AKA "Heartsorb", under the tongue three times daily to prevent it.
I was ignoring symptoms for a time a few years back until they got bad, and now have a lovely eight inch scar on my chest. Open heart surgery is a fabulously painful experience. I heartily recommend a preventative program, if it is not too late.
Do you know they shut down your heart and lungs, and have machines do that for you for as much as a couple of hours? In my lifetime no heart beat and no breathing meant you were clinically dead.
I hope my experience can scare anybody who has been ignoring " little chest pains". You don't know what fun is until they let you regain consciousness and then yank the ventilator tubes out. Then the bladder catheter...chest drain... pace maker leads they put in just in case.
Good luck man!

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

BANGKOK 12 December 2017 09:20
Sponsors
×