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Bought 12 Cows have limited knowledge

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I used to have a bit to do with export oaten hay out of Australia that was sent to asian countries.

Farmers baled it in 8x4x4 bales then it was sent to the exporter where it was unbaled then put into huge presses to compress it into a couple of blocks to fill a shipping container.

Oaten hay is about 7 percent protein so i guess it had to be packed tighter for transport compared to small bales of alalfa at 15 percent.Still in a country where margins are minimal you would think there was a more viable option to get the alalfa here cheaper unless it is coming in bulk then being rebaled here.

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20 hours ago, Michael Hare said:

Purple guinea is declining in popularity because of leaf diseases. I have just released another new guinea grass this year. Named it Mun River guinea grass after the big river here in Ubon. 

 

Thanks for letting me know that the 44,000 baht worth of your Purple Guinea seed that I recently purchased is prone to leaf diseases.

 

You might want to Google: Post Purchase Cognitive Dissonance 

 

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1 hour ago, JungleBiker said:

 

Thanks for letting me know that the 44,000 baht worth of your Purple Guinea seed that I recently purchased is prone to leaf diseases.

 

You might want to Google: Post Purchase Cognitive Dissonance 

 

Ouch.

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6 hours ago, JungleBiker said:

 

Thanks for letting me know that the 44,000 baht worth of your Purple Guinea seed that I recently purchased is prone to leaf diseases.

 

You might want to Google: Post Purchase Cognitive Dissonance 

 

Eagerly awaiting the apologetic reply and offer of exchanging your Purple Guinea seeds for the Mun River variety.

 

Go for it @Michael Hare

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I'm no scientist but i think every variety of seed succumbs to some form of disease over time and depending on the season.Most can be controlled if monitered.A  lot depends on plant density,spacings,rainfall,weather etc.

What do you look for in a seed variety?

High yield,strong stem,rust resilient,no leaf disease.

You vary rarely get all you want in one.

Just my opinion.

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10 hours ago, farmerjo said:

I'm no scientist but i think every variety of seed succumbs to some form of disease over time and depending on the season.Most can be controlled if monitered.A  lot depends on plant density,spacings,rainfall,weather etc.

What do you look for in a seed variety?

High yield,strong stem,rust resilient,no leaf disease.

You vary rarely get all you want in one.

Just my opinion.

Well, in this case, since it will not be grown for animal forage, high yield and strong stem are not important, but it would be good if the grass did not succumb to disease.  

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On 6/13/2018 at 5:56 AM, JungleBiker said:

I can't mention any names but I know there is a large dairy farm in northeast Thailand that is owned by a major company and is getting very good milk yields (I can look up the yields if anyone is interested). They are importing container loads of the above product (bales of alfalfa hay from USA) to feed their cows. I guess they pay far less than the above retail price. Perhaps the above bales were imported by the same company. 

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If it is the company I think it is they yields are good 18-20kg/cow/day ?,and they are milking 300 cows?,  which is good for Thailand, they manager is a Farang I meet the guy last year, he knows his cows.

 Buying in the imported hay, I  did not know, they use to feed Nappier grass, may still do .but not as much  .                         I live only 50 km from  Mortlec  and Packchon, and Chok Chie is another 40 km up the road, all 3 areas have a lot of cows  I have been up they in the new year on more than one occasion, and it is a top coat cooler than where I am,they must have more rain than us as they always seem to have grass growing ,but the do some irrigating .

At the Thai annual dairy show at Mortlec ,they have a 4day milking competition, cow that gives the most milk wins , one very frequent winner comes from Packchon. 

Back in 1963 the king of Denmark gave our late King 50 Danish red cows, the Thai DLD said Mortlec ,would be good for cows being a bit cooler, they still had big problems namely tick fever, a good few died, no resistance to tick fever,but heat-wise not much of a problem.

That is where the Thai -Danish milk brand name come from, the red cow and calf logo comes from the Danish red cattle. 

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On 6/13/2018 at 9:46 AM, farmerjo said:

I used to have a bit to do with export oaten hay out of Australia that was sent to asian countries.

Farmers baled it in 8x4x4 bales then it was sent to the exporter where it was unbaled then put into huge presses to compress it into a couple of blocks to fill a shipping container.

Oaten hay is about 7 percent protein so i guess it had to be packed tighter for transport compared to small bales of alalfa at 15 percent.Still in a country where margins are minimal you would think there was a more viable option to get the alalfa here cheaper unless it is coming in bulk then being rebaled here.

Why Thailand has to import hay beats me ,the alfalfa hay I looked at looked all stem and no leaf ,it is the leaf were protein is ,not the stem  I would say it would be no more than 9-11 % protein when the likes of Mombasa Guinea grass and Mulato II will ,if grown right will give you a fed of 10% .

And do not start on carbon footprints etc etc ,of sending a container of hay halfway around the world. 

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Beef in Thailand has always confused me.  Around our place, there is a handful of farmers who raise small beef herds. They sell to some middleman from Bangkok. So where does the beef from these scraggly herds end up?

 

Throughout the years, I have eaten in tons of shops that sell Thai food and very seldom do I see beef on the menu. 

road cows.JPG

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3 hours ago, missoura said:

Beef in Thailand has always confused me.  Around our place, there is a handful of farmers who raise small beef herds. They sell to some middleman from Bangkok. So where does the beef from these scraggly herds end up?

 

Throughout the years, I have eaten in tons of shops that sell Thai food and very seldom do I see beef on the menu. 

 

 

I've heard that a lot of beef animals go to places near Bangkok where they are finished in feedlots. Besides steaks, I think a lot of beef goes into meatballs used in certain kinds of noodle soup (like "kwetio reua"). 

 

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On 6/16/2018 at 6:59 PM, kickstart said:

And do not start on carbon footprints etc etc ,of sending a container of hay halfway around the world. 

 

There is a lot of container traffic going from Asia to USA carrying consumer goods like T-shirts and iPhones, etc, that would otherwise come back empty. US alfalfa exporters can get very cheap rates shipping their hay to Asia. 

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On 6/15/2018 at 6:48 PM, kickstart said:

If it is the company I think it is they yields are good 18-20kg/cow/day ?,and they are milking 300 cows?,  which is good for Thailand, they manager is a Farang I meet the guy last year, he knows his cows.

 Buying in the imported hay, I  did not know, they use to feed Nappier grass, may still do .but not as much  .                         I live only 50 km from  Mortlec  and Packchon, and Chok Chie is another 40 km up the road, all 3 areas have a lot of cows  I have been up they in the new year on more than one occasion, and it is a top coat cooler than where I am,they must have more rain than us as they always seem to have grass growing ,but the do some irrigating .

At the Thai annual dairy show at Mortlec ,they have a 4day milking competition, cow that gives the most milk wins , one very frequent winner comes from Packchon. 

Back in 1963 the king of Denmark gave our late King 50 Danish red cows, the Thai DLD said Mortlec ,would be good for cows being a bit cooler, they still had big problems namely tick fever, a good few died, no resistance to tick fever,but heat-wise not much of a problem.

That is where the Thai -Danish milk brand name come from, the red cow and calf logo comes from the Danish red cattle. 

 

Is the company you are thinking of (with 300 cows and foreign manager) in the area you talk about (between Saraburi and Korat)?

 

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I've heard that a lot of beef animals go to places near Bangkok where they are finished in feedlots. Besides steaks, I think a lot of beef goes into meatballs used in certain kinds of noodle soup (like "kwetio reua"). 
 
And other processed food that contains beef such as burger patties etc.

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10 hours ago, JungleBiker said:

 

Is the company you are thinking of (with 300 cows and foreign manager) in the area you talk about (between Saraburi and Korat)?

 

Sakon Nakhon is where this farm is.

There use to be a farang owned a dairy farm near Seekue, not far from Packchon,Korat , but he sold up 7-8 years ago, I know that a dairy farmer friend of mine near here brought some of his cows.

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BANGKOK 21 July 2018 01:23
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