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Mark H

Isaan translation

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If it is in dialect then I can’t say but to me it says: I am disappointed/ its a shame/ I Dick did not come to night.

 

 

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28 minutes ago, tgeezer said:


I see that you have gone for the derogatory ไอ้ I didn’t because I feel that เสียดาย is normally sincereฺ


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The first word usually means a pity, so we could change the sentence to "It's a pity that Khun Tick does not come...tonight." 

 

เสียดาย   = pity    ไอ้ติ๊ก =  Tick     ไม่ได้  = No    มา = Come  …. คืนนี้    =   tonight
S̄eīydāy                   Xị̂ tík                  Mị̀ dị̂                         …..    Khụ̄n nī̂
Edited by jenny2017

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I was fishing to find out if you knew that ไอ้ was always derogatory in Isaan.
I read ไม่-ได้มา Did not come, as compared with ไม่ได้-มา unable to come.
My Thai has not developed to the point where I can see any difference practically but then we all have different parlance as the translations show, so that just leaves the ไอ้ word.
Is it good old Dick or that bastard Dick or something in between?


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My view is that ไอ้ is not always derogatory. It very much depends on the relationship between the speaker and the ไอ้ person. If they are familiar, peers, used to using common language and young, they will usually refer to one another as ไอ้______ If they are not familiar, it can be very rude and disrespectful.

 

Since we don't know the relationship between ไอ้ติ๊ก and the speaker we can only guess. I personally would not go for "damn Tik" in the translation.

 

There is nothing in the way of Isaan in the sentence that I can see.

 

Translation : It's a shame Tik didn't come / isn't coming tonight.

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I don’t think that เสียดาย is likely to be sarcastic in this case so perhaps we don’t need to guess.
I put IDick because I didn’t know how to translate it but now I think that I would use ‘our friend Dick’.



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I don’t think that เสียดาย is likely to be sarcastic in this case so perhaps we don’t need to guess.
I put IDick because I didn’t know how to translate it but now I think that I would use ‘our friend Dick’.



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Whats wrong with 'Mr Dick' or 'I' meaning the man Dick?

I think I hear it used referring to a man and it this case 'the man Dick', not 'that prick Dick.'

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carlyai, I asked about ไอ้ as a defined term in Isaan. As to translating ไอ้ with a man's name like Dick, surely we must either consider it redundant or meaningful in context.
With 'our friend Dick' I have suggested a context; that ไอ้ is an affectionate term which places Dick as one of a group of friends based on the fact that เสียดาย is sincere.
The OP has not returned you notice, so we may never know the situation.
I may write a lot more than other people but that doesn't mean that I know more, only that I question more.



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On 25/12/2560 at 5:12 AM, tgeezer said:


Is it good old Dick or that bastard Dick or something in between?

 

It all depends on the level of familiarity between the speakers and context, I = that bastard is about right, if your friend don't mind being called 'that bastard' in their own circle of friends then it is used in endearment

 

In proper use, I would only be used in register preserved for lesser thing, like animals pet or inanimate objects, ไอ้หมาตัวนั้น = that bloody dog

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Sorry tgeezer, I meant my post as a general reply, not as a reply to you. I would never question you or your knowledge.

"I" seems to stand for the male and "e" female. If the persons name is "Tick" the "I Tick" would be for a male named Tick.
Now "I sut", seems to me to mean a bit more than "that bastard animal".

Not that my wife has ever called me the latter in jest.
After 30 + years of marriage, she can sometimes call me what she likes.

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You may well be correct carlyai, titles are important to the language ไอ้ for men and อี for women. I think that they are better assimilated than learnt.
For example, a friend called to a bird ไอ้นก (talking to a bird?) . Now if I am about to take a shot and there is a bird swalking, rather than just saying เงียบสิ I can say ไอ้นกเงียบสิ The point being that I have confidence in ไอ้นก.

ไอ้ส้ตว์ seems like it could be “you animal” which in English could be nasty or nice, do you know which?
In the third person it could be simply “the males of animals” but I think that I would say สัตว์ตัวผู้ in that case.


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