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Over 33 per cent of children are ‘disadvantaged’

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Over 33 per cent of children are ‘disadvantaged’

By The Nation

 

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MORE THAN one in three children in Thailand are in disadvantaged groups, Mental Health Department’s director-general, Dr Squadron-Leader Boonruang Triruangworawat said yesterday.

 

“Of 13.82 million children [below 18 years of age], at least 5 million are underprivileged,” Boonruang said. 

 

He said 80 per cent of underprivileged children were financially poor and about six per cent were from multi-ethnic groups and without rights to state-provided healthcare services. 

 

Agencies that extended medical services to these children would have to foot the bill themselves, he pointed out. The not-too flattering figures were released a day ahead of National Children’s Day, which will be celebrated across the country today. Every year, Thailand celebrates Children’s Day on the second Saturday of January.

 

Boonruang also disclosed that up to 220,842 children in Thailand had intellectual disabilities or autism. 

 

He added that just 5.59 per cent of the multi-ethnic children and those who were intellectually challenged could access healthcare services. 

“Of them, just 25.33 per cent have had access to education,” he said. 

 

Boonruang said their lack of opportunities also hurt the country, depriving it of otherwise quality human resources. 

 

He said his department had implemented a project to develop a healthcare system for intellectually challenged children between 2013 and 2015. During the period, the project found that about 91.4 per cent of intellectually challenged students had oral-health problems in 2014.

“In 2015, the percentage of those having oral-health problems dropped sharply to 90.7,” he said. 

 

Rajanukul Institute director Amporn Benjaponpitak said it was necessary to develop children because they were the foundation of the country. “We need to do more to address children’s problems,” she said. She also lamented that inequalities still prevailed in children’s care. 

 

“So, it’s best to start promoting equality today,” Amporn said. 

 

Boonruang said that this year his agency would take an integrated approach in ensuring that children with intellectual disabilities gain access to healthcare support. 

 

Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/national/30336123

 

 
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-- © Copyright The Nation 2018-01-13

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5 minutes ago, JAG said:

"Multi Ethnic" is no doubt code speak for "hill tribe".
It is a disgrace that so many hill tribe children have little or no access to health or education provision. Many of them come from communities that have lived in Thailand for generations, yet have never been recognised or given nationality, and with it those all important documents which allows such access.

Sent from my KENNY using Thailand Forum - Thaivisa mobile app
 

Do the hilltribes also pay tax?

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I agree with the 6 percent that do not have rights due to their statelessness. I'm not seeing the 80 percent underprivileged story though. on the grand scale of things thai children are well cared for. Low income yes. Poor and underprivileged  no. 

All thai children have access to free healthcare, free education, all books, uniforms and school lunch is free. School milk is free. There are plenty of government housing projects and anyone can go to the temple at 11 o'clock everyday to recieve free food.  All have food, clothing and shelter. In fact thailand now has a problem with obese children from being fed too much. 

There are a lot of abandoned and abused kids. That is a bad parenting issue. 

We can't all have a Mercedes benz.

 

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6 minutes ago, JAG said:

"Multi Ethnic" is no doubt code speak for "hill tribe".
It is a disgrace that so many hill tribe children have little or no access to health or education provision. Many of them come from communities that have lived in Thailand for generations, yet have never been recognised or given nationality, and with it those all important documents which allows such access.

Most hill-tribe people have been given Thai Nationality and the hilltribe villages do have free Schools and health care , most of the stateless people are those whose Parents fled from neighboring Countries and the cildren (now adults) have no proof of being born in Thailand .

   If people can prove that they were born in Thailand and went to school there and lived all their life there, they usually get given Thai I.D

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10 minutes ago, greatwhitenorth said:

Due to their statelessness, children are denied entrance into classrooms and are unable to receive a K-12 formal education.

That isnt correct .

Stateless Children have the legal right to remain in Thailand and they are legally required to enroll and attend Schools up until 16 years old , upon completion of schooling and with proof of being born in Thailand, they would them be eligible to apply for and to receive Thai I.D and citizenship and therefore be able to attend higher education

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So that means 67% are "advantaged"!

Heck! That's even better than the "glass half full"; "glass half empty" analogy.

Edited by marginline
Math!
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BANGKOK 18 July 2018 14:00
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