Jump to content
watgate

US Medicare eligibility

Recommended Posts

Is it correct that a US citizen can not reside in Thailand for more then 6 months so as to not become ineligible for Medicare once you turn 65?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Medicare can not be used in most locations outside the USA but there is no turn off for having lived overseas that I have ever heard of.  Suspect you have confused with some other countries socialized medicine residency requirements.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Eligibility for Medicare is only based on work credits over your life but as said it can't be used outside of the U.S.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As above. You can reside 12 months a year in Thailand (or any other country) and still have medicare. I do. So does every other American of Medicare age I know of living here

 

BUT it does not pay for medical care here. You have to go back to the US to use it .

 

 

 

Sent from my SM-J701F using Thailand Forum - Thaivisa mobile app

 

 

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am still perplexed because a friend told me he has a group medicare advantage PPO plan and he said the handbook states if you are away from their service area for more than 6 months you will be terminated from the above mentioned plan.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, watgate said:

I am still perplexed because a friend told me he has a group medicare advantage PPO plan and he said the handbook states if you are away from their service area for more than 6 months you will be terminated from the above mentioned plan.

That's not standard Medicare. That's a PRIVATE plan. 

https://www.medicare.gov/sign-up-change-plans/medicare-health-plans/medicare-advantage-plans/medicare-advantage-plans.html

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The "standard," and minimum, Medicare is Part A, free.  I have it, since it's free, but only good for use if I happen to visit the U.S., not good here in Thailand.

 

Everything else with "medicare" in the name, such as Part B and so on, you need to pay extra for and I don't think these add-ons are good overseas.

 

Mac

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I  think he is referring to a senior medical plan such as Kaiser Advantage (Northwest) which is in conjunction with medicare. And Kaiser covers "emergency" and "urgent" while traveling (Thailand) but must reside in USA in covered area and not be out of area more than 6 consecutive months.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/13/2018 at 11:16 PM, watgate said:

I am still perplexed because a friend told me he has a group medicare advantage PPO plan and he said the handbook states if you are away from their service area for more than 6 months you will be terminated from the above mentioned plan.

I believe that's more of a PPO-related restriction than a Medicare-related restricted.  i.e. Anybody enrolled in that PPO, whether on a Medicare plan or pre-retirement age, must live in their service area to receive treatment.  To set limits on it, they drop you from the plan if you don't live in the service area full-time at a six month limit.  Very similar with HMOs, if you are more familiar with them.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/13/2018 at 11:16 PM, watgate said:

I am still perplexed because a friend told me he has a group medicare advantage PPO plan and he said the handbook states if you are away from their service area for more than 6 months you will be terminated from the above mentioned plan.

I agree with posts #9 and #10. Many plans have a regional area so they can provide discounts within their service area. If you live out of area then that defeats the plan's business model. My old plan was like that but my new is administered by Anthem and has no area restriction with worldwide urgent care. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/14/2018 at 6:34 AM, Thanyaburi Mac said:

The "standard," and minimum, Medicare is Part A, free.  I have it, since it's free, but only good for use if I happen to visit the U.S., not good here in Thailand.

 

Everything else with "medicare" in the name, such as Part B and so on, you need to pay extra for and I don't think these add-ons are good overseas.

 

Mac

Yes, but my understanding is that for the "extra" stuff if you don't pay for it while overseas, IF you repatriate you will be penalized for that and charged more.

 

I realize many people think they may never repatriate, but people change their minds about things, even old people. 

Edited by Jingthing
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Jingthing said:

Yes, but my understanding is that for the "extra" stuff if you don't pay for it while overseas, IF you repatriate you will be penalized for that and charged more.

 

I realize many people think they may never repatriate, but people change their minds about things, even old people. 

Many Americans unwisely  drop  their part B coverage thinking they will never have to repatriate. Then living here they have a major health problem and are forced to repatriate basically broke. Returning,  they must pay a major penalty for part B coverage which is needed to get Medicare part c (drug coverage) or get a Medicare supplement or advantage policy. Part B is government funded with additional premiums from Medicare enrollees. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The penalty adds up, too:

 

In most cases, if you don't sign up for Part B when you're first eligible, you'll have to pay a late enrollment penalty. You'll have to pay this penalty for as long as you have Part B. Your monthly premium for Part B may go up 10% for each full 12-month period that you could have had Part B, but didn't sign up for it. Also, you may have to wait until the General Enrollment Period (from January 1 to March 31) to enroll in Part B. Coverage will start July 1 of that year.

source: Medicare web page

 

The standard Part B premium amount in 2018 is $134 (or higher depending on your income).  So, if you became eligible today but waited five years to enroll, you'd pay $201 monthly ... for the rest of your life.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, wpcoe said:

The penalty adds up, too:

 

 

 

source: Medicare web page

 

The standard Part B premium amount in 2018 is $134 (or higher depending on your income).  So, if you became eligible today but waited five years to enroll, you'd pay $201 monthly ... for the rest of your life.

Save 134 x 60 months = 8040 in five years.  That 8040 will then cover 3.33 years (40) months once signed up. So really not penalized until 8.33 years past age 65 (age 73 +). 

 

Food for thought 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

BANGKOK 22 August 2018 12:50
Sponsors
×