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BANGKOK 10 December 2018 09:54
waxpro

Where to get a Laptop can run dual operating systems in BKK?

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Hey guys

Looking to buy a new laptop that can dual operating systems: windows and Linux,

The device (laptop) will be used as a regular work station,

for graphic designs, video editing, FTP uploads and all other related functions,
the whole job will be done mainly with Windows 7 or 10, then Linux will be used for learning, and practicing (newbie stage)


some friend advise me to look at: HP 15-bc207TX , this available at panthip plaza actually,
Any recommendations / comments about this tech guys?
have anyone used / using one machine installed with Linux and windows?
how stable and efficient the machine's performance with dual or multiple operating systems installed?
Kindly advise accordingly, any precise recommendations will be highly appreciated and considered,
Many thanks in advance!

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Just get 8gb of ram or more and a good laptop - then install vertualbox on windows 10 and then install linux mint in virtualbox and then you can run both at the same time.  You can start linux anytime you want it or script it to start after windows is completed booting.  You can do this yourself easy enough - all you need for linux is the iso file you don't even have to burn it to a cd and virtualbox will mount it - it will never bother your windows install it runs as a file and only sees its own vitual drive unless you take steps to force it to see the other - you can even set up copy paste sharing between the two OS's as well as file shares etc. and in bridge mode (recommended) your local network just sees it as another PC complete with own IP address.  Its all free for personnel use - all of it.

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6 hours ago, RKASA said:

Just get 8gb of ram or more and a good laptop - then install vertualbox on windows 10 and then install linux mint in virtualbox and then you can run both at the same time.  You can start linux anytime you want it or script it to start after windows is completed booting.  You can do this yourself easy enough - all you need for linux is the iso file you don't even have to burn it to a cd and virtualbox will mount it - it will never bother your windows install it runs as a file and only sees its own vitual drive unless you take steps to force it to see the other - you can even set up copy paste sharing between the two OS's as well as file shares etc. and in bridge mode (recommended) your local network just sees it as another PC complete with own IP address.  Its all free for personnel use - all of it.

It looks so interesting to run both at the same time as operating 2 separate machines!

I still not clear enough about this practically, however, will try and see how it goes, thanks brother!

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You can follow this it should help alot

 

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all the computers and laptop can boot on Linux and Windows and have dual boot.

But for maximum compatibility for all material on the laptop, there is Clevo (and some others).

Also, you should install a bootloader like Grub (or some others), then use it to boot on what evere OS you've installed.

 

The virtualization is something who will eat some CPU load and RAM memory, but also you will loose GPU... or you need to passthrough his PCI port to get direct access of your GPU from your virtual guest system(so if you are noob... it will be difficult for you). It works perfectly and i use it for windows-7 running under Qemu/kvm with Nvidia and USB-3.. PCI card direct access.

 

If you don't know to do it yourself there is two choices (maybe more, the other i don't know them):

1/ take time to learn it by read articles online, go to suscribe with a Linux club and practice/share

2/ paid a specialist (it should have in Thailand... but... not sure, i never see)

 

or

 

"man pain araiii " (big smile)

 

chock dii

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Windows 10 now has WSL (Windows Subystem Linux) which enables Linux within Windows itself - https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/askpfeplat/2018/04/09/windows-subsystem-for-linux-and-bash-shell-2018-update/

I shifted back to Windows after 10 years on Mac recently (because the new MBPs are shoddy) and use WSL extensively, have all my microservices, git, node, go, java running under Linux and then normal Windows apps running alongside, also Docker running under Windows with Linux mapped to it - it's actually a really nice dev setup.

That said, it certainly required decent Linux knowledge and research skills to get it all working nicely, if you want to 'play' with Linux in isolation, a VM is probably the way (you can still have VMs alongside WSL though)

Edited by rwdrwdrwd

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I use Linux as a host and another Linux distribution as a host. After I installed Guest Additions I noticed I had options for 3D acceleration and 2D video acceleration. I haven't tried them.

 

Once your guest operating system is installed and you've installed Guest Additions you can find the options in the setting menu of the guest OS under the 'Display' tab.

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I prefer to run Linux in native mode and leave Windows out of it. Instead of more resources, you use fewer resources. Linux can be a lifeboat should Windows fail to start. You never see a blue screen if you stay out of Windows.

 

I assume you have a UEFI drive.  I've found that using Rufus, which means using WIndows, will create a bootable USB drive that will boot a UEFI computer. There's a boot repair utility. Install it on your USB drive.  After you install, you'll get a GRUB menu. If the computer doesn't start, boot from the USB drive and run the repair utility.

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Sorry to sound thick, but can anyone tell me what Linux can do which Windows 10 doesn't, please. And vice versa.

Edited by wgdanson

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Two indicators as to which OS is better:

 

Apple and Android are both based on Linux.

 

Windows rescue programs are Linux programs.

 

some specifics:

 

Linux uses less memory and less storage.

 

It runs faster.

 

Linux file systems don't require defrag.

 

You don't get blue screens such as "windows is updating . . ."

 

You don't get infected.

 

You don't get involuntary updates.

 

It's free.

 

You don't worry about "activation"

 

You choose how it looks. You're not stuck with what Redmond chooses.  Imagine being able to switch between Windows 8 and Windows XP desktops.

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3 hours ago, wgdanson said:

Sorry to sound thick, but can anyone tell me what Linux can do which Windows 10 doesn't, please. And vice versa.

It's more a case of what Linux doesn't do.

 

It doesn't crash and burn and it doesn't get infected, it just works.  I use both Linux and Windows, my work laptops run Windows because I have software that only runs and is supported on Windows. My desktop and the children's desktop both run Linux. Having initially set the children up with Windows, after the second issue with viruses brought back with USB sticks from school, I dumped Windows for Linux - no problems since. They can't break it and it does all they need.

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22 minutes ago, Stocky said:

It's more a case of what Linux doesn't do.

 

It doesn't crash and burn and it doesn't get infected, it just works.  I use both Linux and Windows, my work laptops run Windows because I have software that only runs and is supported on Windows. My desktop and the children's desktop both run Linux. Having initially set the children up with Windows, after the second issue with viruses brought back with USB sticks from school, I dumped Windows for Linux - no problems since. They can't break it and it does all they need.

Thank you for that, and I am partially in the same boat as you in that I do music production with programs which will only run on Windows, and secondly...............I don't have any kids !!!!!!  

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Another hint as to reliability: I've read that CERN uses it because it's stable. While living in China, a coworker told me that the nuclear facility nearby used Linux because it's reliable.

 

It can be a challenge at first. I'd start with Linux Mint or Lubuntu or Xubuntu or Mate. If you happen to have a Chromebook, you're already using Chrome OS, a Linux system and can add Xubuntu and other flavors as a "crouton." You can also run Gallium (Xubuntu tweaked for a Chromebook) from a USB drive.

 

And, of course, North Korea has its own Linux distro (Morning Star?). Run that one in a virtual box. There's no telling what that distro will send to Pyongyang.

Edited by gunghang

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4 hours ago, wgdanson said:

Thank you for that, and I am partially in the same boat as you in that I do music production with programs which will only run on Windows, and secondly...............I don't have any kids !!!!!!  

You should look into Ubuntu Studio. The Ubuntu flavor is designed with multimedia professionals in mind.  https://ubuntustudio.org/

 

In the past the issue with music was a problem with latency in the kernel and a few years ago this flavor (distribution) was built to address that. It has been a community ever since. You'll find documentation and software support in Linux very different from the Windows world.

 

If it were me and I was a media pro testing Linux for the first time I would do a standalone machine. Virtual machines have problems that would just get in the way of a professional workflow and after all that is what you seek. So if you have a not so important computer laying around I'd go stand alone. Having said the I have VMs installed on my Linux computer and use it for fun and testing.

 

After you see what Linux has to offer you might find that you need to use Windows software and then using a VM or Play-On_Linux.

 

The only way to know is to get your feet wet. Good luck

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2 minutes ago, jmd8800 said:

You should look into Ubuntu Studio. The Ubuntu flavor is designed with multimedia professionals in mind.  https://ubuntustudio.org/

 

In the past the issue with music was a problem with latency in the kernel and a few years ago this flavor (distribution) was built to address that. It has been a community ever since. You'll find documentation and software support in Linux very different from the Windows world.

 

If it were me and I was a media pro testing Linux for the first time I would do a standalone machine. Virtual machines have problems that would just get in the way of a professional workflow and after all that is what you seek. So if you have a not so important computer laying around I'd go stand alone. Having said the I have VMs installed on my Linux computer and use it for fun and testing.

 

After you see what Linux has to offer you might find that you need to use Windows software and then using a VM or Play-On_Linux.

 

The only way to know is to get your feet wet. Good luck

Thank you for the info. I do have an Intel i5 NUC 'spare' which I only use as a media centre, so will give it a go. I use Sonar Platinum so must look around for alternative. Cheers.

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