Jump to content
cmsally

Smoke, Smog, Dust 2018 Chiang Mai

Recommended Posts

EPA’s bands for Good, Moderate, etc are based on 24 hour numbers. If you are exposed to a 24hr average PM2.5 of 100, it is unhealthy. AQICN, however, uses the 1hr number. The health implications for exposure to a 1-hr average number has not been determined. This means that the risk is almost certainly overstated.

Saying that, this 1hr number is far more useful for making on the spot decisions about outdoor activities than the 3hr PSI which looks at longer trends. Yes, use AQICN, but do not expect the government to announce a state of emergency based on their numbers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

wind-fanning.jpg satelite images cannot diferentiate between these 3 pollutions

wind-coning.jpgwind-looping.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

he following analysis graphs are based on "day +1" forecast

 

Forecast, keyword not same as real time air analysis

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The ubidots figures are so wildly different from the other readings for northern Thailand that there must be something amiss. Anyone who's been out and about in Chiangmai city knows that the air in CMU, Mae Hia and  Suan Dok is really pretty dirty - just walk around for an hour and blow your nose into a clean handkerchief  to see the black filth all us city dwellers endure.   Get real!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, TheScribe said:

The ubidots figures are so wildly different from the other readings for northern Thailand that there must be something amiss. Anyone who's been out and about in Chiangmai city knows that the air in CMU, Mae Hia and  Suan Dok is really pretty dirty - just walk around for an hour and blow your nose into a clean handkerchief  to see the black filth all us city dwellers endure.   Get real!

ubidots reading are not different from the government one, because they are based on real measurements, use sensors and real-time.

 

Absolutelly, blatant lies, today is sunny days, no where dust or smoke in air.

  • Sad 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, LolaS said:

ubidots reading are not different from the government one, because they are based on real measurements, use sensors and real-time.

 

Absolutelly, blatant lies, today is sunny days, no where dust or smoke in air.

So you can see the mountains clearly then? Or has David Copperfield done a trick?

 

Just have a look at the NASA firemaps and you clearly see that there are hundreds of fields on fire.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The official Thai Pollution Control Department does its own data collection and publishes hourly figures on the website aqmthai.com.  Its not easy to use but getting pm2.5 is possible for the two monitoring stations in Chiangmai.  Here's the one for Chang Puak. It is a lot lower than the aqicn figures.

 

 

Screen Shot 2018-03-04 at 16.11.13.png

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, TheScribe said:

The official Thai Pollution Control Department does its own data collection and publishes hourly figures on the website aqmthai.com.  Its not easy to use but getting pm2.5 is possible for the two monitoring stations in Chiangmai.  Here's the one for Chang Puak. It is a lot lower than the aqicn figures.

 

 

Screen Shot 2018-03-04 at 16.11.13.png

Can you check if the relative readings are much different from one month to the next. Could it not be that they are using a different scale?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's lots of info on the aqicn.org website about how they collect and present the data.  All air pollution data on particulates are measured in micro-grammes per cubic metre (equal to ppb or parts-per-billion).  

 

Quite why the Thai and Chinese websites show very different values for what seems to be the same monitoring stations is a mystery to me.  

 

On the aqmthai.com site, you need to click the "report" tab, choose "manual report", choose  35t or 36 t for either of the 2 monitoring stations supported, enter dates and report type, choose pm10 or pm2.5, choose dates, click button for table or graph. All damn fiddly but it can be done...

 

LolaS, sunny day or not tells us nothing about particulate air pollution.  Nothing at all.  aqicn website tells us how the data is collected and reported.  Look at http://aqicn.org/gaia/.   Satellite readings are never mentioned at all.  I think you're making the whole thing up.  But why?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Another website that shows CM air quality data clearly is http://chiangmaiair.org.  I think they get their data from aqicn, but its presented nicely and there's 7 days and full season history.   

Edited by TheScribe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, TheScribe said:

There's lots of info on the aqicn.org website about how they collect and present the data.  All air pollution data on particulates are measured in micro-grammes per cubic metre (equal to ppb or parts-per-billion).  

 

Quite why the Thai and Chinese websites show very different values for what seems to be the same monitoring stations is a mystery to me.  

 

On the aqmthai.com site, you need to click the "report" tab, choose "manual report", choose  35t or 36 t for either of the 2 monitoring stations supported, enter dates and report type, choose pm10 or pm2.5, choose dates, click button for table or graph. All damn fiddly but it can be done...

 

LolaS, sunny day or not tells us nothing about particulate air pollution.  Nothing at all.  aqicn website tells us how the data is collected and reported.  Look at http://aqicn.org/gaia/.   Satellite readings are never mentioned at all.  I think you're making the whole thing up.  But why?

aqicn state

The Gaia Ax series is a semi-professional Air Quality monitoring product

 

I trust science and professional measurement, I dont trust approximation,  there are 3 sensors one in CMU, one in suandok, and second in maehia.

also they measure close to road. AQICN is unrealiable, 

  • Confused 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

LolaS wrote: "there are 3 sensors one in CMU, one in suandok, and second in maehia."

 

Well that is good.  I hope you can now set up a public website that gives us all the information that they are collecting.  I'm looking forward to seeing it!

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

have been looking for more info on measuring stations for CMU, Suan Dokh, Mae Hia and can find nothing. It says above that they monitor close to the road, this would suggest that there is info out there giving the specific location. Would someone be so kind as to point me to that info.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Off-topic, inflammatory posts have been removed.  Continue making personal remarks aimed at others and you will receive a suspension.  

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good to see on the global forest watch site that Chian Rai is showing total compliance with the burning ban. As they did last year as well.

Sent from my [device_name] using http://Thailand Forum - Thaivisa mobile app

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

BANGKOK 25 June 2018 09:05
Sponsors
×