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3 hours ago, Johnniey said:

 When you live here a while, you'll learn that law, and law enforcement in Thailand are two very different things.

He's lived here a long time and been a positive, contributor to this form for a long time.  

 

 

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On 3/19/2018 at 9:08 AM, Loaded said:

Most online teaching in Thailand is illegal.

 

The teacher works in Thailand without the required non-immigrant visa and work permit. The teacher doesn't declare their income to the Thai tax authorities.

 

The Chinese company earns income from their overseas operations in Thailand. They fail to provide the required visas and work permit for their staff. They avoid Thai tax on their revenues. They don't have a Thai school license. I could go on.

 

It won't continue for much longer once the Thai government realizes what's happening under their noses.

 

 

Nah. Nobody cares or knows....use a VPN..keep a low profile.

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On 4/7/2018 at 8:59 AM, Loaded said:

A lot of sensitive crims on this thread - get legal.

 

Is what you're suggesting even possible?  How can somebody in Thailand get a business visa and work permit when both their customers and employer are not in Thailand?

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^ why?

 

There's nothing illegal about being remotely employed by a foreign company (non-Thai), dealing with foreigners (non-Thai), in foreign locations (not in Thailand) , while being paid (and paying the tax) in your home country, and that money staying there, while in your own property while happening to be here.

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Just now, attrayant said:

How can somebody in Thailand get a business visa and work permit when both their customers and employer are not in Thailand?

It can't, because it doesn't need to. 

 

 

If they were needed, the system would be set up (have been set up), and thousands and thousands would pay the money for registration etc. and tax for money paid into Thai accounts. But nope, not needed. :)

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I will have to be careful next time wifey asks me to go to Tesco! and pick up shopping for the neighbour, I am working, I will have to tell her I will sit in the coffee shop while she does the shopping, as I don't have a WP, plus its a job that Thai's can do! plus no more housework, ironing or cooking. I have to obey the laws of the land!

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32 minutes ago, Happy Grumpy said:

It can't, because it doesn't need to.

 

I agree, but since Loaded made the recommendation to "get legal", I am hoping he'll come back to fill in the blanks.

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Years ago, I was doing some writing for a magazine and decided that Thailand would be a nice place to do so.   The research was done, it was a matter of just getting it written.   The magazine and the article was not based in Thailand.    I was paid outside the country, but I was told to get a non-B and a work permit.  

 

At that time both were much easier than now.   But that was the instructions from the Embassy where the non-B was granted.  

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12 minutes ago, Scott said:

Years ago, I was doing some writing for a magazine and decided that Thailand would be a nice place to do so.   The research was done, it was a matter of just getting it written.   The magazine and the article was not based in Thailand.    I was paid outside the country, but I was told to get a non-B and a work permit.  

 

At that time both were much easier than now.   But that was the instructions from the Embassy where the non-B was granted.  

 

Back to the overall discussion, seems to me that several contributors are conveniently omitting one point; the person is physically located in Thailand when they do the work.

 

 

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1 minute ago, scorecard said:

 

Back to the overall discussion, seems to me that several contributors are conveniently omitting one point; the person is physically located in Thailand when they do the work.

 

 

I think you have pretty much nailed it with that post.   My past experience and my discussions with several immigration officers (informally--as I knew them as parents of children at our school), is that it is illegal to work in the country without a work permit.  

One immigration officer said that they generally give such people a pass, provided they are otherwise legal, but technically it is against the rules.    The ones that they do target are those working in an office or central location, where it is more like a business.  

 

 

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1 hour ago, Scott said:

Years ago, I was doing some writing for a magazine and decided that Thailand would be a nice place to do so.   The research was done, it was a matter of just getting it written.   The magazine and the article was not based in Thailand.    I was paid outside the country, but I was told to get a non-B and a work permit.  

 

Finally something we can get our teeth into.  From what I recall six years ago when I got myself set up to start teaching, there was a small mountain of paperwork required from the employer.  Things like certification of a certain minimum amount of local capital, employment contract, signatures from directors and so on.  Had I not had a school HR person doing this for me, I surely would have drowned in all the paperwork.  Since you were basically a foreign correspondent rather than a teacher, were all those same documents required?  Here they are:-

 

The applicant has to submit the following documents:

  • 2 inches photo
  • medical certificate
  • original passport
  • letter of employment
  • certificate of degree
  • address in Thailand

The employer has to provide the following:

  • company certificate and objectives
  • list of shareholders
  • application for VAT
  • withholding tax of the company
  • financial statement
  • photocopy of the director’s passport and work permit with signature affixed
  • office map
  • letter of employment stating position and salary of applicant
  • employment agreement

 

The red items are those that my last employer (DC Government) would not have been willing or able to provide.  What would the Thai labor office do without them, just say "okay never mind"?  And what about needing a degree?  Not all jobs in other countries require a degree.

 

It's hard to believe that I would need to go traipsing back and forth between Thailand and Washington to get a forgotten signature or redo a piece of paperwork.  There must be a fast-track process for certain skilled professionals who need to start working the day they enter the country, because you can't be sitting around for weeks while your employer pays you, waiting for your work permit to be issued.

 

I'm not sure if ThaiEmbassy-dot-com is authoritative, but here's what it says:

 

"To legally work in Thailand, a foreigner must apply for a work permit. Work permit is a legal document that states a foreigner’s position, current occupation, or job description and the Thai company he is working with. It also serves as a license to perform a job or an occupation allowed for foreigners inside Thailand."

 

"...and the Thai company he is working with".  I note that photography appears in the list of prohibited occupations.  Surely foreign correspondents have come here to take pictures before.  A brief search on Amazon for photography books of Thailand brings up sixteen results on the first page and fifteen of them don't appear to be Thai authors, based on the names.  How would they have gotten their work permit?  The only answer that makes sense is that the rules are for photographers working in Thailand for Thai companies and providing services to Thai people, like a wedding photographer or a photographer for the BK Post.

 

The only thing I am trying to say here is that the normal rules we're all used to for working in Thailand, for a Thai company, providing goods or services to Thai people, don't seem to make much sense when neither your employer nor your clients are Thai.

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BANGKOK 20 April 2018 15:52
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