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ghworker2010

Electric pump to improve water pressure?

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We signed a long lease on a 4 level building. The pressure on ground and first floor is ok. Above that is no good. City water is connected but no pump yet. 

 

How do the pumps work exactly? Theres an old tank in the back garden and an old pump. I thought that the tank has to be on the highest part of the building and then pump the water up to that and then this supplies the whole building. Is this correct? Should we aim to put it on the upper level or will it work being located on the ground level?

 

Is an electric pump system guaranteed to give strong water supply to all floors once working correctly?

 

thanks

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Town water flows into tank on the ground 

From there you will need a pump - You will have to check size & make (should have label ), would be good for other posters to know this info as they will maybe post pump charts

Water pressure should be ok if correct pump depending on how many outlets are opened

It has been noted that hot water shower systems do lack pressure

Also make sure there is a tap on the pipe that goes to the house (just after pump ) so you can turn of if have problem in house or to stop the water draining from house if problem outside 

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In my place the town water feeds a tank on the ground floor, that gravity feeds the pump, the pump then does it's thing to move it upwards with pressure.

 

I use a 250 watt pump with no pressure tank to take it up one more story, but you can get a higher wattage pump to do more work.

 

My pump is now 10 years old and has been in constant use...

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53 minutes ago, ghworker2010 said:

Is an electric pump system guaranteed to give strong water supply to all floors once working correctly?

 

There are no guarantees in Thailand, but a properly designed and installed pump system will do the job- 100%*.

 

The size of the pump you need depends on how many tenants (actually, how many liters per minute you need) and the elevation you need to pump that water to.  I'd suggest you have a look at the old system and post up the nameplate information, along with an idea of what your LPM needs may be.  Sounds like the old system is either inadequate, or worn out.

 

*One caveat to that 100%...  If the pipes from the city are corroded or scaled up, it's possible that your system may be starved for inlet water and that needs to be fixed.  Not a high probability, but I don't know where you are, or where your building fits in the city distribution system.

 

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4 minutes ago, impulse said:

 

There are no guarantees in Thailand, but a properly designed and installed pump system will do the job- 100%*.

 

The size of the pump you need depends on how many tenants (actually, how many liters per minute you need) and the elevation you need to pump that water to.  I'd suggest you have a look at the old system and post up the nameplate information, along with an idea of what your LPM needs may be.  Sounds like the old system is either inadequate, or worn out.

 

*One caveat to that 100%...  If the pipes from the city are corroded or scaled up, it's possible that your system may be starved for inlet water and that needs to be fixed.  Not a high probability, but I don't know where you are, or where your building fits in the city distribution system.

 

My town water supply pressure would never reach my upper floor with any real pressure. I have a bypass in case the pump packs up, it struggles to get to my first floor..

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Posted (edited)
10 minutes ago, transam said:

My town water supply pressure would never reach my upper floor with any real pressure. I have a bypass in case the pump packs up, it struggles to get to my first floor..

 

One quick test is to open up the city line at the ground floor into a bucket and see how many liters per minute it will flow with no back pressure at all.  If you need (for example) 100 liters per minute for when everyone's taking a shower, and the city line only gives you 10 liters per minute, you can still make it work.  But you'll need to add storage capacity onsite to collect that 10 liters per minute all day long so you'll have the 100 liters per minute when everyone gets up in the morning, flushes the toilet and hops in the shower.  Peak use may only last an hour or so...

 

That's why you see so many of those big stainless or plastic water tanks on the roofs of so many buildings.  Putting the storage on the roof also reduces the size of the pump you need to meet peak demand since the water's already at elevation- your peak time pump doesn't have to lift it AND add pressure.

 

Edit:  If I'm making a point here, it's that there is some engineering that goes into these systems.  And lots of companies in Thailand that have the engineering talent onboard.  Some of them are happy to do the engineering if you're going to buy the system from them.  The little neighborhood shops that sells chain saws, drill presses and water pumps aren't them.

 

Edited by impulse

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Posted (edited)
6 minutes ago, impulse said:

 

One quick test is to open up the city line at the ground floor into a bucket and see how many liters per minute it will flow with no back pressure at all.  If you need (for example) 100 liters per minute for when everyone's taking a shower, and the city line only gives you 10 liters per minute, you can still make it work.  But you'll need to add storage capacity onsite to collect that 10 liters per minute all day long so you'll have the 100 liters per minute when everyone gets up in the morning, flushes the toilet and hops in the shower.  Peak use may only last an hour or so...

 

That's why you see so many of those big stainless or plastic water tanks on the roofs of so many buildings.  Putting the storage on the roof also reduces the size of the pump you need to meet peak demand since the water's already at elevation- your peak time pump doesn't have to lift it AND add pressure.

 

My point was directed at the OP's situation. Ground floor tank on site, fit non pressure tank pump, job done..But someone has to pay for the electric, the landlord will not want too...

Edited by transam

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Until the OP comes back with a sensible description of his 4 level lease its all hot air to nowhere.

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Simplest: Most domestic water pumps will lift 9m and have a discharge of about 19m and rated for 2-3 storey properties. so if you want to shower on the top floor put the pump on the 1st floor.  Pump will lift the water up and then distribute. 

 

Best: Tank on the roof is the best bet if the roof can support the load then pump down from there. Requires two tanks ( ground level storage and roof storage) and two pumps (one to pump the water up and one to distribute.) but... 

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Posted (edited)
30 minutes ago, crazykopite said:

I to had a 4 storey property with the same issue I purchased a computerised Grunfos pump this is the dogs <deleted> of pumps it even has an indicator that tells you if you have a leak in your house . I put on all 6 of my power showers as well as 14 taps and on every floor there was no difference in pressure it made such a difference , the only issue was the price 20,000 baht the whole thing is plastic so no rust issues best pump I have ever had .

CAB60FCF-E1A0-4085-9581-E8DA06BBD291.jpeg

5C172261-8A2A-43FB-91CE-3392AA90D1B8.jpeg

I think the prices have come down a bit since you bought yours 

IMG_3950.thumb.JPG.da9ab7651bf41c3501772cfce902f437.JPGSCALA2 3-45 is now 17,000

Edited by sometimewoodworker

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The OP could consider visiting an authorized Mitsubishi SUPER PUMP dealer. It will not be Homepro, ThaiWatsadu, Global House, Home Mart, or Mega Home. A water pump specialist can show him the brochure and actual working Mitsubishi Super Pump. Most every Province has one Mitsubishi Superpump dealer that installs water pumps at taller student housing apartment buildings.  In Buriram you can see what water pumps work in multi story buildings including the Buritel Hotel, Keen Condominium, B2 Hotel,. Hop Inn, etc.. The price difference between Mitsubishi Super Pumps and the imported Grundfos pumps of a similar function is significant. 

Buriram Isaan Mitsubishi 7 stage pressure water pumps.JPG

Buriram Multistage Booster Mitsubishi water pump installation.JPG

Buriram Isaan Mitsubishi Super Home Water Pump.JPG

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Grundfos are very good pumps providing hi PSI (hopefully your pipes are good for it).  But those available in PI seem to be without pressure tanks - just cup size reserve - so have to start each time water is required and stay on.  This staying on can be a problem if your draw tank is in equator sun as the water can get too hot to cool pump and cause shutdown.  When I used that type pump had to build roof over water tanks to keep sun from hitting them.

 

In Thailand most sold now look similar to below and have start/stop pressure setting and have been using some years now without any failure.  Had previously used bottom image type.

Related image

Image result for grundfos water pump

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I have one of these, ground floor water tank feeds it, 10 years old..

 

pump.jpg.7b411a03504680e3bdcb458f5b825653.jpg

 

 

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Posted (edited)

LOL. The OP disapears and team Mitsubishi move in complete with thumbs up fashion show, negatives about using the large hardware stores and the high price of Grundfos pumps. Coming soon, pumps power tools and thumbs up scantily clad girls.

Edited by Fruit Trader
  • Haha 1

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BANGKOK 23 May 2018 06:20
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