Jump to content
BANGKOK 22 October 2018 23:19
EricTh

How to say fall down

Recommended Posts

 

How to say 'if I accidentally fall down'.

 

Fall down here means fall on the floor.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Owwww….Loong Loi!...…….orrr horrr!

Edited by PatOngo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ล้ม lom - is faint (then fall) more of older people, you know the heat and diet here older people faint very freqently.

ตกพื้น - tok puun - fall to the floor

ลื่น - slip (on the floor)

บังเอิญ - bung ern - accidently - adverb

would precede any of the 3 verbs above but not really necessary, nobody intentionally falls, faints, or slips :)


Sent from my iPhone using Thaivisa Connect

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, PatOngo said:

Owwww….Loong Loi!...…….orrr horrr!

อ้าว! ลงเลย โอ้โห-  specifically the underlined - 'long lery/loi/wery'

If you said like this to somebody it would be a bit rude, like laughing at somebody falling down.

 

E.g. -- Whoah!  down he/she/they goes, unbelievable!

 

In the context of watching somebody fall it works, but it is more like 'go down,'  you would tell your kid who is standing on a table -  ลงเลย  - = Get down

Asking if the person has come down from the mountain yet?

ยังไม่ลง(เลย) - He/She/They haven't come down yet.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 'if I accidentally fall down'.

 

Sorry just noticed you had an 'if' in there.. I would need more context to translate the 'If' there are several ways of presenting theoretical situations in Thai, or at least give me a proper English sentence to begin with.  Theoreticals use the past tense, you would need "fell' and also the rest of the sentence: "If + S + V2, then _________"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, surfdog said:

อ้าว! ลงเลย โอ้โห-  specifically the underlined - 'long lery/loi/wery'

If you said like this to somebody it would be a bit rude, like laughing at somebody falling down.

 

E.g. -- Whoah!  down he/she/they goes, unbelievable!

 

In the context of watching somebody fall it works, but it is more like 'go down,'  you would tell your kid who is standing on a table -  ลงเลย  - = Get down

Asking if the person has come down from the mountain yet?

ยังไม่ลง(เลย) - He/She/They haven't come down yet.

.….isn't that common practise?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Taa tock din 

If fall ground

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, MaeJoMTB said:

Taa tock din 

If fall ground

ถ้าตกดิน - Din would limit you to only dirt, one translation could be 'ground' but it would exclude paved areas, floors, tile, concrete, etc.

If the situation you are proposing is hypothetical and you need to the listener to really hear out your theoretical situation you would want to use  สมมุติว่า - "Som-mut wa," or if you are formally educated like Adam Bradshaw, you would only use ถ้าหาก 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, surfdog said:

ถ้าตกดิน - Din would limit you to only dirt, one translation could be 'ground' but it would exclude paved areas, floors, tile, concrete, etc.

If the situation you are proposing is hypothetical and you need to the listener to really hear out your theoretical situation you would want to use  สมมุติว่า - "Som-mut wa," or if you are formally educated like Adam Bradshaw, you would only use ถ้าหาก 

Most of the Thais I know use 'din' to mean ground.

You tink too mutt!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
41 minutes ago, MaeJoMTB said:

Most of the Thais I know use 'din' to mean ground.

You tink too mutt!

yes ground is a correct translation, it just excludes 'indoor' areas or tiled, paved, concrete floors, etc.  Depending on where you are living, everything is 'outdoors' and nothing wrong with that :)

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It depends on how you fall...

 

ล้ม lóm is to fall from an upright position, to tumble (it's got nothing to do with fainting, that is เป็นลม bpen lom), you use this one when you stumble and fall down walking or riding a bike

 

ตก dtòk is to fall straight down from a certain height, like when you fall from a tree

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thanks for challenging that, I have a linguistics degree so that was the fun part of learning, as people challenging each others conception of language and I find it interesting. this type of conversation is what I did for 4 years, so don’t take
offense please on contradiction.

So, I always understood เป็นลม as a feeling of about to faint, in using conversation you could say ร้อนมาก แม่จะเป็นลม

I have never heard it used in describing a person who has already fainted.

But according to my dictionary เป็นลม ‘to faint’ but editor avoided classifying as a verb... so you are correct, but I would not be confident usimg myself
personally, because I tend to pick up my Thai from conversation, and have never heard it used as a verb

ล้ม also has definition of collapse, and difference betweem collapsing from the heat vs fainting from the heat seems 0, but with enough proofs in context some differences could arise but can not think off off hand.



IMG_0873.JPG
IMG_0874.JPG

I would use ตก as the general catch all of falling down, but replace im case of fainting, collapsing, slipping.

ตกดิน has the primary and only definition of sun setting in my dictionary, but I still think it can apply to falling down in the dirt IMG_0875.JPG


Sent from my iPhone using Thailand Forum - Thaivisa mobile app

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

just for fun in south to fall down we say “พลัด” It’s for like accidental falls like tripping, motercycle crash, but not for fainting, collapsing, or slipping.

Wondering now if I fell out of a tree would they still say ตก here or พลัด.

There is likely other regional words for falling down, we could add to this thread to make it “THE #1 resource of everything you need to know about falling down in Thailand”


Sent from my iPhone using Thaivisa Connect

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Obviously both ล้ม and ตก have several related meanings.

 

But I’d say ล้ม is the general word for falling when you are standing up, walking, riding a bike, etc. 

พลาดล้ม “to fall by mistake” could be what the OP is looking for.

 

For ตก you really have to fall down from something. The RID gives the examples ตกบันได to fall from the stairs, and ตกต้นไม้ to fall from a tree.

 

 

What this girl is doing is ล้ม, if she fell off the stage down to the floor that would be ตก

 

Then there are more specific words like สะดุด to trip over something and fall, or idioms like จับกบ, lit. to catch a frog (imagine the position you’re in when you try to catch a frog and you’ll see the connection :)

 

Hadn’t heard of พลัด before, apparently it gets used in Central Thai too. I’ll look out for that one, see if I hear it somewhere...

Edited by eric67
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

that video is hilarious! I’m an <deleted> for thinking that I guess.

Can you not “ล้มบันได” as well? Believe I heard that before.

I was at tiger temple with the 1200 stairs up the mountain and this lady fainted at step 250 or so and busted her head open. Now I know I heard ‘lom’ but not sure if heard ล้ม or ลม but definitely not เป็นลม

พลัด seems like is just southern spelling of พลาด?

สะดุด heard before, sounds specific to tripping then?


Sent from my iPhone using Thaivisa Connect

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

Sponsors
×