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EricTh

Thai words that aren't really Thai

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I read from this blog that a lot of Thai words that the teachers taught me aren't really Thai, they are Indian in origin. 

 

http://eastasiaorigin.blogspot.com/2017/08/origin-of-thai-language.html

 

I don't know why those Thai teachers like to teach Indic words when common Thai people on the street don't really use them.

 

Is there any Thai schools in CM that actually teach the way that normal Thai speak rather than those formal Indian words?

 

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thais use many words with origins from india, your task is futile,

much like the english word window stems from the norse word wind-eye,

i.e the hole in the roof for letting the smoke out,

what else should an englishman call a window these days ?

maybe eurohole

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1 hour ago, poanoi said:

thais use many words with origins from india, your task is futile,

much like the english word window stems from the norse word wind-eye,

i.e the hole in the roof for letting the smoke out,

what else should an englishman call a window these days ?

maybe eurohole

 

In the case of English, if there are no alternative words, then you must use it. Did you read the article above?

 

In the case of Thai, there are alternative native words that are not Indian in origin and that are surprisingly not taught in Thai schools but used by native Thai people.

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oh well... the most commonly heard Thai borrowed word would have to be 'falang'

 

or, was it borrowed from the Hindi?   

अमरूद 

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2 hours ago, Jane Dough said:

Does not khru or teacher come from guru.....

Seems like both Khru and Ajarn are of Indic origin.

 

I wonder what is the native Thai word for teacher.

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Lots of words like หมา mǎa (dog) and สุนัข sù~nák (dog). The former is "Thai", the latter from Sanskrit. You will hear both used. No alternative to learning both if you want to understand.

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16 hours ago, EricTh said:

I wonder what is the native Thai word for teacher.

 

ผู้สอน?

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19 hours ago, EricTh said:

In the case of Thai, there are alternative native words that are not Indian in origin and that are surprisingly not taught in Thai schools but used by native Thai people.

 

I'm not sure how true that is (well, apart from obscenities).  However, a school's objective would be to teach you to be able to speak respectable Thai, not gutter Thai.  And to do that, one needs to learn formal words.

 

(If you ever hear someone speaking Thai who has learned it from a bar girl, it's immediately obvious what sort of person he is.  Speak respectable Thai and nobody will know if you're a whoremonger or not.)

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Oxx said:

 

I'm not sure how true that is (well, apart from obscenities).  However, a school's objective would be to teach you to be able to speak respectable Thai, not gutter Thai.  And to do that, one needs to learn formal words.

 

 

 

I beg to differ, I would rather learn a native Thai word rather than an Indian word.

Only when I decide to get a degree in Thai, would I need to learn all these formal words.

 

My main purpose is to communicate with everyday Thai people, not those government officials or teachers.

 

I was in a Thai class , and when I mentioned the Thai word for dog which is commonly used as an example, none of my other classmates know what it means because the teacher only taught them the formal word for dog which normal Thai people don't use.

 

That's the same as English teachers not teaching foreigners the word 'guy or gal' which are informal but widely used. That's nothing 'gutter' about using 'guy or gal' versus 'damsel/lady or gentleman'.

 

Edited by EricTh

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I can't argue with your approach EricTh. Like all languages education improves one's ability to communicate but street language is adequate in that both 'hi' and 'lo' undetsand it.


Sent from my iPad using Thaivisa Connect

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I doubt that there's really a school that teaches สุนัข but not หมา

 

If there really is a school as such, I think it's the quality of the school that's the problem, not whether Thai has too much loanwords from Sanskrit.

 

It'd be equally preposterous for a learner of English as foreign language to complain that English contain too many words with French/German/Greek and Latin origin ruining the spelling with all the irregularities why cant dem skool teach english like how we speek it on da street innit?

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On 5/22/2018 at 11:03 PM, EricTh said:

I don't know why those Thai teachers like to teach Indic words when common Thai people on the street don't really use them.

I didn't see that article say that common Thai people on the street don't use the Sanskrit-derived words. They entered the Thai language hundreds of years ago, and all of the examples given are very common words: ภรรยา, สามี, ประเทศ, ทาน, คุณ. I would be very surprised if the average Thai person didn't know those words. We're not talking ราชาศัพท์/royal language here.

 

And as that article says, some native Thai words are now considered crude. You're not going to win any friends by calling people มึง because you want to stick with native Thai vocabulary.

 

In any case, my point is that just because a word has a foreign origin doesn't mean that it's too fancy for the average person. "Pork", "beef", and "poultry" are from French, but they're very common English words. The native Germanic "pig", "cow", and "chicken" are also very common, but have a slightly different meaning or connotation.

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I doubt that there's really a school that teaches สุนัข but not หมา
 
If there really is a school as such, I think it's the quality of the school that's the problem, not whether Thai has too much loanwords from Sanskrit.
 
It'd be equally preposterous for a learner of English as foreign language to complain that English contain too many words with French/German/Greek and Latin origin ruining the spelling with all the irregularities why cant dem skool teach english like how we speek it on da street innit?


hard to add to this! But even more needs said, native ‘Thai’ is spelled ‘Tai’ and Tai speakers are now mostly found in Yunnan, China. You are in the wrong country to learn Tai. Thai is a mixture of Tai, Pali, Khmer, and even Portugese and French. I think they say Thai is more Khmer in syntax, but Pali and Tai in vocabulary.

But I get your reasoning and your frustration, your Thai teacher is teaching formal Thai, and it’s not helpful because you need colloquial Thai more on the streets, Also has to do with ‘written’ vs ‘spoken’ language. This type of teacher absolutely will insist “kup” is not a word, you must say “krup.”

Find a new teacher, one who would teach both colloquial and formal at the same time. Or just teach yourself, I did, have friends who did, and likely other forum members have.

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BANGKOK 25 June 2018 09:05
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